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GDHumbleLearner

Framework

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I want to start programming in native c++ for pc games. i used to a RAD environment. i know that mfc, managed or cli or clr c++ is taboo in this industry. what framework supports native c++ in the game programming industry?
or
do you have manually write win32 api code?

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I want to start programming in native c++ for pc games. i used to a RAD environment. i know that mfc, managed or cli or clr c++ is taboo in this industry. what framework supports native c++ in the game programming industry?
or
do you have manually write win32 api code?


Depends on for what. People don't use MFC or managed for the actual games, but the tools they sure do ( not really sure anyone uses C++ CLR, it's an odd duck ).

More and more so, people use engines, thats abstract away platform details like writing win32 code. Otherwise yeah, people code at that level and generally hide it behind home grown class libraries, as frankly writing win32 code sucks pretty hard.

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currently, i am at the tic-tac-toe or tetris game programming/development level. are there engines at that level?


Depends on how you define an Engine. To some degree, GameMaker could be consider an engine of sorts, as well it would be perfectly possible to implement Tic Tac Toe in Unity.

That said, in a matter of answering your question in the intent I believe it was asked, no, there aren't engines for that level.

There are however libraries like SFML, SDL or PyGame that make such a project much easier, and provide the basic framework of a game for you to build out from.



Add I know you are no doubt asking in your head what are the difference between a library and an engine? Frankly, semantics.

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I used to use GameMaker a lot. It really helped me understand how games work (in a simplistic sense) when I was younger. However I recommend going straight into C++, which is what you want to do. SDL seems to be very popular and would be a good place to start.

It might be a good idea to do a couple of Win32 tutorials just so that you understand more what is going on at the application level.

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i was going to buy window programming by charles petzold and dive into the low level world of the win32 api,


If you want to learn how to code games, don't waste your time with the Win32 API. Except for setting up your main window, you won't have to deal with it. And you can even use something like SDL to skip that part and concentrate on the real game programming.

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If you want to learn how to code games, don't waste your time with the Win32 API. Except for setting up your main window, you won't have to deal with it. And you can even use something like SDL to skip that part and concentrate on the real game programming.


That's true. Don't spend too long on the Win32 API because to be quite frank it is a mess. However, knowing how to recognise common commands within the Win32 API would go a long way, and it will also help you to understand what is going on. If you truly just want to make games then you can skip learning the Win32 API, but if you want to develop a greater knowledge of Windows prorgamming just do a couple of tutorials on Win32 programming, setting up a window, collecting input from the user, that kind of thing.

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