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CS program has had a lot of math cut out

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Basically, the CS program for the school I was transfering to has cut math all the way down to where I don't even need calc 2, just a statistics class and one semester of discrete math. They also have a lot of 'applied' courses required such as unix, java, c++ and ecommerce, etc.....

My goal is to focus on theory courses in college and I can work on the applied aspects on my own time or after I graduate. So I looked into some things and it seems the pure math major might be better for me. I get a good solid foundation in all of the math, expecially linear algebra and I have a lot of room for electives that I can make a super minor in CS. I can hit more discrete math and statistics, but still get about 5 or 6 core upper division cs courses covered ie algorithims and complexity, OSs, programming languages, databases and security, etc.... Mind you I have exausted my local CC and have comepleted one semester of linear algebra, diff eqs, vector calc and statistics, as well as c,c++ and assembly. So am I better off on the math theory route, or just doing the CS program, regardless of all of the changes made and the courses I have completed?

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Sounds like a CIS/CMIS program than a CS program. Excuse me for asking but is this school a community/junior college or technical (ITT) college or online college (Univ. of Phoenix)?

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The school is CSU Stan. I spoke with the CS chair/head of dept. The changes are not listed yet, but when I transfer, that is what the CS program they have will be. I could also try going to CSU Sac, I have not looked into that yet because I did not think the program was this lax, a failure on my part not to try out for multiple schools.

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Just because the school does not require them in their minimum degree requirements does not mean you cannot take them.

Schools have the minimum requirements that serve as a baseline. Apparently enough people at the school were convinced to drop them from the baseline, probably in favor of other courses. Often degree programs will include a a number of unspecified credit hours for you to take courses that focus on your personal path.

You can take more than the minimum requirements, and I strongly recommend you do.



Take whatever courses you need for your own personal education.

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I appreciate that frob. I guess my next question is, what core math and cs courses do I want when I go into the games industry then. To be honest that is not really easy to find out. I know I should know unix, c, c++ and linear algebra. I am not clear on what else is of value when I enter the market. I am also aware I do not want to tailor my degree too much for gaming incase I ever decide I want to do something else. So which courses in theory and application courses you feel are important, to a solid well rounded fundamental BSCS. Mind you I ask this question because the head of the cs dept who was telling me how lax the program is had no idea what i should take for that route.

EDIT: Let me clarify what I have taken and what is required in the cs degree at csu stan.

Taken

c,c++
assembly
unix
intro to cs
diff eq
vector calc
linear algebra
1 year of lab physics
statistics
(This will be a total of 60 units when I transfer along with my general ed requirements.)

What I will be taking at CSU Stan:

Discrete math (1 semester)
operating systems
computer theory
data structures and algorithms
comp software eng
programming languages
computer organization.
Senior Project
And then 9 units of electives in the cs dept that are not the classes listed above.

That makes 33 upper division units, plus my 60 from the CC. Leaving about 27 units left over to graduate, including other general ed classes.


Soo what am I missing from this list of courses that will really round out my cs degree?

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CSU Stan does have a game engine course and a networks and security course I could take as an elective. Any help in filling in those remaining untis woulod be great. I am also allowed to take some graduate classes if I so desired.

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Take as much math and physics as you can stomach and complement with personal projects. Some SE stuff is never wrong to add as well if you can manage. Data structures and theory is great; if they have more of that, take it. Depending on interests, I'd also say take a course in AI (assuming they have one).

Other than that, I don't have any specific course recommendations; just don't tack anything on that you probably wouldn't like because you feel that you "need" it. Good luck! :)

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What do you want from your life?

You don't list anything like it but asked for recomendations. Take some real life useful classes as audit or as pass/fail so it does not imact you grade. Perhaps requetball or swimming or self defence martial arts or swordfighting. Dance classes are fun, much like a female in a CS class gets attention, so does a single guy learning the foxtrot. Learn art or music theory or astronomy, or get dirt under your fingernails in a bottany class. Maybe an accounting class for home business finances, or something else entirely. Do not get so focused on your career that you forget about life.

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Soo what am I missing from this list of courses that will really round out my cs degree?


I would definitely add/recommend:
1. Course on numerical analysis - you need to learn how to number crunch and the limitations of using a computer in doing so (round-off error, floating point representation, etc.)
2. Algorithms - including O(n) notation and how to create and evaluate the runtime performance of such
3. Logic - probably in the Philosophy Department - includes truth tables, logical proofs, and the likes.

Does "Computer Theory" cover P=NP, pigeonhole principle, etc.? Just make sure it isn't a fluff course. This material should be pretty hard-core but absolutely essential for a well-rounded computer science degree.

Even for games, these courses will provide a lot of value imo.

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