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Kris Kirov

A Tablet to Choose

10 posts in this topic

Greetings, forum.

I considered buying a tablet. I’ve heard here and there that WACOM is one of the best choices to make. Since I am planning to use a tablet mainly with Photoshop and rarely Autodesk products I read the certifications in the official websites. I, however, thought it would be better if I asked “know how” people about the choice of a tablet.

Also, I was recommended the Intous 4 tablet. I think that the M (medium) size should be enough to do the job for me.

My questions are:

1.What tablet would you propose as artists and why.

2.How about the older tablet series ? Does it make much difference if I buy an older?

3.I see many input devices. Should I buy only one or a few, maybe all? What is the advantage of having all the input devices (pens and so on) , is there a point ?
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1) Those I have best experience with (in descending order): Cintiq 21UX (they have a newer model; might be better), Intuos 4 L, Intuos 4 M. Bamboo is OK for practice but that's about it.

2) Short answer: no, it does not matter if it's an older model.
3) Yes, but it might not matter to [i]you[/i]. In fact, it probably doesn't.
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I purchased an intuos 4 medium. it has served its purpose for learning. I know alot of folks who have gotten the intuos bamboo model to begin with but i plan on doing it pretty seriously so I went right for the intuos 4 med.

the default pen would be fine to learn with.

older tablets are just as good. there are lots of people still using intuos 3 models because you dont wear the pen tips away as fast. you get more pressure sensitivity out of the newer models but when your learning its hard tell the difference between the two anyway.

im saving up for a cintiq. I want to be able to draw directly on the screen. I dont like the disconnect feeling from tablets.
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I'm not sure what your level of skill is, but for beginners I would recommend Wacom Bamboo. I bought it, not knowing whether or not I would end up using it much. It's more than good enough for me, as a beginner! If you know for sure you'll be using your tablet a lot, then I think Wacom Cintiq is a good medium between price and quality - although I haven't tested any of those myself.
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Wacoms are the first choice for an artist for a reason. The pens don't have batteries, which makes them lighter and last longer, they are more responsive, and come in a variety of models.

Bamboos aren't a bad place to start, but once you get used to one of the higher end models, it's hard to go back.
The larger your tablet, the more natural your translation of strokes will be (even if you usually draw small) but it will be harder to transport the tablet, and be more expensive.
I'm using an Intuos 3, which works just as well as the 4 series. I upgraded from the original Graphire (with a PS2 connection.) The nib is worn, and the surface is scratched, but I can probably plug it in and it'll work.

The Intuos came with a mouse, which I rarely use, since you are limited to staying on the tablet, and a few extra nibs for the pen. I didn't notice a huge difference when I switched them. I never tried the 6D pen or the airbrush.
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In my opinion you should use the "size matters" mentality. Don't get anything that's Small.

Go from Medium to above, like Large and even Extra Large if you can afford. Large is my recommended size - get the measures and cut yourself a piece of paper that size so you have an idea.

As for brands, Wacom for the reasons Hamsta stated above. I've used Intuos3 and thought it was great, but that's an old model. If you're going for the Intuos4, make sure it's the latest revision as it appears there were some problems with excessive nub-wear ("nub" being the replaceable plastic tip of the pen); this was allegedly improved in a latter revision of the model.

If you can't afford a new one, look for good condition second-hand entries.
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The Bamboo is nice, especially if you're not sure whether you want to get serious or not. I was nervous about the size before buying, but honestly it's not that big of a deal. You typically use the tablet in absolute positioning mode, so a larger model means you have to cover more physical area to cross the screen. Useful if you want to be very precise, but the Bamboo works a lot better than you expect.

On the other hand if you want to be serious about this, go straight for one of the bigger models. No point buying one, only to find it's inadequate and you have to get the other one anyway.
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Thank you for the support ALL !

The day before I was browsing the internet stores and found a second hand Intuos 3 Large that was used for only 1 month or so - all the features were said to be incuded except for the mouse.All for 150 EU (210 USD). I think I made a perfect deal assuming your professional advices.And to the questions above - yes I am going to use it for professional purpose.My professional career begins tomorrow when the tablet is delivered :)
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That's great. I don't know what time availability you have, but if you paint complete assignments every few days (say, a landscape or a character), in a few months you will see definite improvement.

If you're looking for high quality educational material, you should take a look at the DVDs by [url="http://www.thegnomonworkshop.com/store/category/11/Photoshop"]The Gnomon Workshop[/url]. You could also subscribe to any magazine that focuses on your software of choice, say Photoshop or Corel Painter (both have their own, and they're great magazines - always come with something interesting).
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You may find yourself frustrated with the tablet at first. Whichever model you chose, it's going to take practice, and you'll have to go through the usual process of having things look bad for a while, before you are comfortable with what you produce.

You need to develop the hand-eye coordination of moving the stylus over the pad, while watching the strokes on your screen. Even with the Cintiq, it feels a little off.
I'm not sure how the Intuos 4's texture would feel to someone without practice, but I found it useful to place a piece of paper over my tablet to get a more natural grip.
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I should try that with the paper for more natural touch :)
However, I now have a question about the nibs of my classic pen (because that is the only pen i have right now).I have ONLY 1 nib , which already is on my pen and has been used for a while.I've read that when used too much, nibs get sharp and start scratching the surface.Well, I have a screen protector of the Intuos but I was wondering if I should buy more nibs - i just don't know when my only one would wear off.
I see nibs differ in color and obvious from the WACOM website - of type: [list][*]standard nibs[*]stroke nib[*]flex nib[*]felt nibs[/list](these are said for Intuos 4)

So, people, does it matter what nibs I buy anyway ? What is each comfortable about and are these all types of nibs?
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