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NathanielBennett

Need a new name...

39 posts in this topic

[quote name='DarklyDreaming' timestamp='1322861363' post='4889915']
Don't use "studios" unless you command more than one studio; otherwise, it's dishonest.
[/quote]

Names don't have to be honest. In fact, honest names are worse. How would Jim's Mediocre Car Repair Shop sound? Or Wang's Fake Asian Food? Or Overly Expensive Insurance Incorporated? No you're creating a brand and a brand has to invoke the image you want in the customer's head. That image doesn't not have to be honest. It just has to be effective.
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[quote name='ManOfThePast' timestamp='1323212436' post='4891249']
[quote name='DarklyDreaming' timestamp='1322861363' post='4889915']
Don't use "studios" unless you command more than one studio; otherwise, it's dishonest.
[/quote]

Names don't have to be honest. In fact, honest names are worse. How would Jim's Mediocre Car Repair Shop sound? Or Wang's Fake Asian Food? Or Overly Expensive Insurance Incorporated? No you're creating a brand and a brand has to invoke the image you want in the customer's head. That image doesn't not have to be honest. It just has to be effective.
[/quote]
Do you also tell your customers you have fifty thousand employees, a three billion dollar revenue yearly, an internationally recognized brand and travel around with a G6 every day?* Being honest has it's benefits - the first one being that people will actually take you [i]seriously [/i]if you don't make claims that are obviously [i]beyond your means[/i]. Being honest and being undermining are different - you have confused the two: your examples are obviously devaluing the business they represent.

If I name my business, I'd like it to be as close as a representation of what I [i]do [/i]as possible since that will guarantee that people recognize a) that I understand my limitations and b) that my customers don't confuse me with a triple-A studio and thus expectations aren't ruined (try knocking out a game with "It's gonna be the best game ever -- seriously!" and tell me how it goes; there is a reason indies generally focus their promotions less on being aggressive towards the game's world-changing power and more towards what makes it [i]stand out[/i]).


If your point was that you shouldn't name your brand with any prefixes that says "Look at me, I suck!" then yes - what a great piece of advice, wouldn't you say? Obvious advice too. There is a difference between that and proclaiming "OMEGA-ULTRA TRIPLE-A RIP-ASS-TITS STUDIOS" is the best name [i]evar[/i]! [img]http://public.gamedev.net/public/style_emoticons/default/wink.gif[/img]

*Obvious silliness is obvious, point being that your examples were equally silly -- in business, you have to be secure in you and your brand; you can do [i]that [/i]without turning into a dishonest brand. In fact, it's better [i]not [/i]to turn into dishonest practices - while sometimes effective, I've found people [i]do [/i]appreciate the honesty we bring to the table.

[size="2"][quote name='Servant of the Lord' timestamp='1323209929' post='4891240']
[/size][size="2"][list][*]Reckless Abadondon[*]River's Shadow Games[*]SkyQuake[*]Midnight Clockwork Entertainment[*]Horizon Games[*]Lost Trail Media[*]Lost Path Games[/list][/quote][/size][size="2"]SkyQuake sounds great, but only makes me think of iD Software's Quake -- a good or bad association, can't tell, but it's there. Horizon Games would probably be a legal hassle if Futuremark got their panties in a twist -- after all, if 'Scrolls' can get Bethesda off from "Elder Scrolls" then "Horizon" could probably get Futuremark pissed enough to sue from "Shattered Horizon". But who knows? Ahh, the fun of doing business. :)[/size]
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[quote name='DarklyDreaming' timestamp='1323213387' post='4891258']
[quote name='ManOfThePast' timestamp='1323212436' post='4891249']
[quote name='DarklyDreaming' timestamp='1322861363' post='4889915']
Don't use "studios" unless you command more than one studio; otherwise, it's dishonest.
[/quote]

Names don't have to be honest. In fact, honest names are worse. How would Jim's Mediocre Car Repair Shop sound? Or Wang's Fake Asian Food? Or Overly Expensive Insurance Incorporated? No you're creating a brand and a brand has to invoke the image you want in the customer's head. That image doesn't not have to be honest. It just has to be effective.
[/quote]
Do you also tell your customers you have fifty thousand employees, a three billion dollar revenue yearly, an internationally recognized brand and travel around with a G6 every day?* Being honest has it's benefits - the first one being that people will actually take you [i]seriously [/i]if you don't make claims that are obviously [i]beyond your means[/i]. Being honest and being undermining are different - you have confused the two: your examples are obviously devaluing the business they represent.

If I name my business, I'd like it to be as close as a representation of what I [i]do [/i]as possible since that will guarantee that people recognize a) that I understand my limitations and b) that my customers don't confuse me with a triple-A studio and thus expectations aren't ruined (try knocking out a game with "It's gonna be the best game ever -- seriously!" and tell me how it goes; there is a reason indies generally focus their promotions less on being aggressive towards the game's world-changing power and more towards what makes it [i]stand out[/i]).


If your point was that you shouldn't name your brand with any prefixes that says "Look at me, I suck!" then yes - what a great piece of advice, wouldn't you say? Obvious advice too. There is a difference between that and proclaiming "OMEGA-ULTRA TRIPLE-A RIP-ASS-TITS STUDIOS" is the best name [i]evar[/i]! [img]http://public.gamedev.net/public/style_emoticons/default/wink.gif[/img]

*Obvious silliness is obvious, point being that your examples were equally silly -- in business, you have to be secure in you and your brand; you can do [i]that [/i]without turning into a dishonest brand. In fact, it's better [i]not [/i]to turn into dishonest practices - while sometimes effective, I've found people [i]do [/i]appreciate the honesty we bring to the table.[/quote]

Fair enough, my examples were a bit rediculous. :) But I was trying to make a point.

Here's the thing --- and this is a bit deep so buckle up --- when you're building a brand, you're building a reality. You're creating associations of names and images in people's minds. Customers will rarely be able to discern the truth behind the brand. Nor will they care. If you're a trustworthy brand that the customers can rely on building great products and services, nothing else matters. Now you still need to be trustworthy in the first place! That means making good products/services and following through. But that's about marketing and operations. Whether you're a 1-man operation or a 100-building campus is mostly irrelevant. You're creating an idea. What do you want that idea to be? Steve Jobs, for example, was well known for pushing reality all the time. He'd walk into a room and they'd say "We can't do X by this date" and he'd say, "Yes you can", and they'd argue back, and after some time everyone in the room would be convinced Jobs was right all along. Jobs wasn't just bending reality --- he was creating it. The same goes with naming your brand.
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Maybe we should all agree to just stick with "Games" instead of "Studio," "Studio[b]s[/b]," or "Productions."
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[quote name='xaviarrob' timestamp='1323224573' post='4891318']
and the name of my company shall be

srand(time(0);
[/quote]

[color="#ff0000"][b]Parse error: [/b]Missing closing parenthesis. Please rename your company and recompile.[/color]
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[quote name='Paul Franzen' timestamp='1323266124' post='4891444']
Maybe we should all agree to just stick with "Games" instead of "Studio," "Studio[b]s[/b]," or "Productions."
[/quote]
Hey, your last name is the same as mine! Cool. :)
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[quote name='DarklyDreaming' timestamp='1323278460' post='4891524']
Hey, your last name is the same as mine! Cool. :)
[/quote]

There's another Franzen in the gamedev community?! We should be besties!


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[size=2]Snizat™ U.S.
Snizat U.S.™
We get tons of publicity, and everyone knows how awesome we are.[/size]

"That's nothing to snizat™!"
"Everyone knows, your standards are nothing to snizat™!"

Will sell trademark rights for 1 million dollars, Thank You.

Or you could join my game studio. Hugo Baya Games™

It's currently me and a cricket. *squish* Whoops, just me... looks like we need a new volunteer VP of HR, I'm sure you'll do better than our last one... you are larger than a sandal, right?
Our last VP was really good, drawing in BIG FISH. A cod, a couple of mackerels, even a tuna.

With respect *Hugo Baya™ Snizat™ and Hugo Baya Snizat™(hint, hint) all associated trademarks are respected properties of their respective respectable respirating owners, please respect them.
(Yes, I was bored and reading the R's in the dictionary. You raggedy Ragamuffin)
*Hugo Baya™ Games is a subdivision of Playa Games™

Using your name, Franzen games, the closest is 'Frozen Games™" which is really too short... how about 4Zen Games™?

Seriously though, try the name generator, it gave me some really good ones.

Well, unless it's 1Man or Juan Maan Incorporated or something like that.

Small tip, 4Zen is actually too close to frozen games, it would get mispronounced most of the time, every game name in this entire document is terrible. Except for these.
Zen Men Games. Postal Games, Full Tilt West Games, Undone Games

Though, there is an advantage to having a game studio name that CANNOT be rhymed. Orange Soft And a disadvantage.
How about Myna Games™? As in the Myna bird? Lonely Fork. Organic Studios. Cracked Games, Bent Games,
Franzen... hmm... Frantic Software? Frantic Zen Games (Two opposites). Fractured Zen Games?
Imma stop at Frantic Zen. And not put an evil, evil little TM next to it. Any good? Opinions?
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I couldn't resist but this company name generator is awesome! It gave me:

- Melon Knives Interactive

- Cat Celery United

- Falling Sawblade

- Tiny Sandwich Collective

- Damaged Ideas Interactive...

:lol:

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This thread had been dormant for almost two years. So that nobody thinks it's a fresh topic and tries to help the OP (2 years after asking the original question), I'm locking this thread.
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