Jump to content
  • Advertisement
Sign in to follow this  
Supernovae

List of reading. Please suggest or comment.

This topic is 2566 days old which is more than the 365 day threshold we allow for new replies. Please post a new topic.

If you intended to correct an error in the post then please contact us.

Recommended Posts

Hello

I'm new to C++ and i have been looking for books to learn more about c++ and game programming.

Here is my goal:
To create prodecural world with countries that the player can manage, it would be done some what same way as infinity quest for earth, but much smaller scale.

So i would like people to suggest what books i need in order to accomplish this. Here is my current list, in reading order:

1. Accelerated C++: Practical Programming by Example
2. C++ Primer 3rd Edition: Stanley Lippman
3. Texturing and Modeling, Third Edition: A Procedural Approach
4. C++ Algorithms 3rd Edition by Robert Sedgewick
5. he C++ Standard Library Tutorial and Reference from Nicolai Josuttis
and finally
6. The C++ Programming Language: Special Edition

HUH! thats alot of stuff to learn. My concern is that i will be programming for windows platform and useing directx, should i get some book about those?

Pleas help and thank you inadvance!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Advertisement
I generally don't like the idea of "By Example" books, as they normally focus more on the code itself, and explaining their code, rather than putting focus on explaining the concepts behind their code. The latter is what's important, as it makes the user solve the problems themselves, which is what's actually important in programming. With that said, there are some exceptions where they first explain the concept(s) then follow up with some example code (i.e. Programming Game AI By Example).

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
You don't need that many C++ books, pick one from (1, 2) and maybe add 5 (but 1 or 2 should cover enough of that to get you going), and ignore 6 entirely.

4 is great if you want a theoretical background in algorithms, but you probably don't need one right now. I'd leave that for a later date.

3 is absolutely essential for procedural stuff, irrespective of language.

And you almost certain do want a DirectX book - it's a fairly confusing topic starting out.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Wow, thats a lot of books. I would trim it to exactly 3. An introductory friendly text, a reference text and Effective C++.


Stroustrup's book is horrifically dry, but is the definitive book on C++, so it will serve well as the reference text.
C++ Without Fear is a very new developer friendly introduction to the language, at least so much as a C++ introduction can be.


Effective C++ simply put, is a book every programmer should own. Buy it. Perhaps later though as you won't need/understand it initially. It is one of the few books, in any genre, I think actually makes you better.




All that said, now is a really lousy time to buy a C++ book. With the recent ratification of the C11 standard, there are a ton of revisions/new editions on the horizon in the next few months. While many books already cover most of the C11 changes ( as TR1 ), the new books will drive down the price of existing books, and of course be more current. Frankly the C++ book market has really really really needed new blood, so a glut of new books is a good thing.


Also, if you are looking at purchasing that many books, if you can read on your screen or a tablet, look into Safari Books Online, they have about 15K texts available on monthly subscription. I subscribe and it is invaluable.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I can definitely recommend the "Accelerated C++" book if you have programmed before (it's less verbose than the other books that spend too much time on general programming basics ("what's a variable?" "what's a loop") as opposed to focusing on C++). That being said, there's some overlap with the Primer... so perhaps you won't need to read them both (it's better to read books in non-overlapping categories, see below).

I disagree that you should limit yourself to one or two -- I'd say it should be at least three, but those three should be covering distinct / ideally non-overlapping different categories -- morality, legality, by-example -- see the following the advice here: http://www.parashift...p.html#faq-28.4

As for C++11 and its implications on it not being the best time to buy a C++ book, there's some truth to that, but if you're at the fundamentals stage it's not a bad idea to still pick up what you can right now, it's going to be a while until more C++11 books (and better C++11-conformant compilers) appear and it's not as if C++98/C++03 will be obsoleted (it's rather that there will be new best practices that will build on / improve the existing ones, evolution not revolution).

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Sign in to follow this  

  • Advertisement
×

Important Information

By using GameDev.net, you agree to our community Guidelines, Terms of Use, and Privacy Policy.

GameDev.net is your game development community. Create an account for your GameDev Portfolio and participate in the largest developer community in the games industry.

Sign me up!