• Announcements

    • khawk

      Download the Game Design and Indie Game Marketing Freebook   07/19/17

      GameDev.net and CRC Press have teamed up to bring a free ebook of content curated from top titles published by CRC Press. The freebook, Practices of Game Design & Indie Game Marketing, includes chapters from The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, and An Architectural Approach to Level Design. The GameDev.net FreeBook is relevant to game designers, developers, and those interested in learning more about the challenges in game development. We know game development can be a tough discipline and business, so we picked several chapters from CRC Press titles that we thought would be of interest to you, the GameDev.net audience, in your journey to design, develop, and market your next game. The free ebook is available through CRC Press by clicking here. The Curated Books The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, Second Edition, by Jesse Schell Presents 100+ sets of questions, or different lenses, for viewing a game’s design, encompassing diverse fields such as psychology, architecture, music, film, software engineering, theme park design, mathematics, anthropology, and more. Written by one of the world's top game designers, this book describes the deepest and most fundamental principles of game design, demonstrating how tactics used in board, card, and athletic games also work in video games. It provides practical instruction on creating world-class games that will be played again and again. View it here. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, by Joel Dreskin Marketing is an essential but too frequently overlooked or minimized component of the release plan for indie games. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing provides you with the tools needed to build visibility and sell your indie games. With special focus on those developers with small budgets and limited staff and resources, this book is packed with tangible recommendations and techniques that you can put to use immediately. As a seasoned professional of the indie game arena, author Joel Dreskin gives you insight into practical, real-world experiences of marketing numerous successful games and also provides stories of the failures. View it here. An Architectural Approach to Level Design This is one of the first books to integrate architectural and spatial design theory with the field of level design. The book presents architectural techniques and theories for level designers to use in their own work. It connects architecture and level design in different ways that address the practical elements of how designers construct space and the experiential elements of how and why humans interact with this space. Throughout the text, readers learn skills for spatial layout, evoking emotion through gamespaces, and creating better levels through architectural theory. View it here. Learn more and download the ebook by clicking here. Did you know? GameDev.net and CRC Press also recently teamed up to bring GDNet+ Members up to a 20% discount on all CRC Press books. Learn more about this and other benefits here.
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0
Tape_Worm

Fake fullscreen

6 posts in this topic

I had the idea to use the fake fullscreen mode (that is, a window with no window border, topmost and maximized) last night after my graphics library decided to start being a huge jerk when switching between windowed and fullscreen mode. However, I'm undecided when it comes to whether I should implement it.


Most people have displays with a fixed resolution, so I don't see the advantage to having a full on video mode transition for these devices. However, what kind of a performance hit would people get? Let's say I've got a 1920x1200 display. If I go to the full fake screen, is the fillrate going to cause a massive hit on lower end cards? Is this hit only applicable to drawing to backbuffer that is sized 1920x1200? Or if I had a 640x480 backbuffer and had the API stretch it to fit the "fullscreen" display, would it be an equal performance penalty?

FYI, I'm using Direct3D 11 for the back end API, but I figured this is broader than the API. But, to get on the topic of D3D 10/11, there's an AllowModeSwitch flag for the swap chain. When you set this flag, it keeps the video mode, but will resize the back buffer to what I've requested. Wouldn't this be a similar thing to the fake fullscreen mode?

Lower than native resolution is going to be ugly no matter how you slice it. So how it looks is not an issue for me.

Anyone want to share thoughts on this?
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I like fake fullscreen as an option. Sometimes VSync is not perfect in window mode, so a true fullscreen option is also good to have.
Stretching a smaller backbuffer to fit a larger screen is usually pretty much free, so I wouldn't worry about that. Actually switching monitor resolutions should always be optional in my opinion, as it can mess with multiple monitors and sometimes causes background windows to resize.
1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Yeah, I hadn't considered vsync in windowed mode.

The issue I ran into with my library was when switching from full screen back to windowed. The damn thing refused to actually revert back to the original video mode until I forced it back myself. This was code that had been working for some time and just decided to not work, so I started wondering if true fullscreen mode was worth the hassle.

I am however concerned about how the library will work with multiple monitor setups in fullscreen. I had a lot of trouble getting that working like I wanted, and given that the previous fullscreen state switch code decided to break, I have my concerns that the multimon stuff will break too (unfortunately I can't test this right now, as I don't have a multiple monitor setup to test with).
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
As of Win7/Vista, the performance of Windowed 3D apps has improved considerably (compared to windowed vs fullscreen apps on XP).

In Starcraft 2, the graphics options gives you the choice of Windowed, Fullscreen and Fullscreen (windowed). I've not really noticed any difference between fullscreen and the "fake" version, except the (lack of) video mode switching.
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
[quote name='Hodgman' timestamp='1322777497' post='4889600']
I've not really noticed any difference between fullscreen and the "fake" version, except the (lack of) video mode switching.[/quote]
There is also the fringe benefit that you can alt-tab much faster in the 'fake' version. And you can float your AIM/gchat/skype over the 'fake' version - in general these two features are well worth any performance hit I might experience.
1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Keep in mind though that people with SLI or Crossfire setups will only be able to use a single card when running in windowed mode since there's no support for windowed applications for neither of these technologies as far as I know
1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
[quote name='Radikalizm' timestamp='1322787167' post='4889643']
Keep in mind though that people with SLI or Crossfire setups will only be able to use a single card when running in windowed mode since there's no support for windowed applications for neither of these technologies as far as I know
[/quote]

Ah, well now, that makes a big difference. I don't have a crossfire/sli setup to test on so I definitely wouldn't have known this. Thanks.
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0