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How to tackle 3D programming in C++?

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Hello, I have learned C++ and learned to add graphics with SFML, pair it up with some physics and collision detection in box2d, and somehow add all of it into a class which could be copy-pasted, into future projects.

So I have learned some fundamental concepts of 2D and learned to setup the libraries for use in visual studio, however, i really wish to get into 3d programming

my goal really is to make some 3D 3rd person mini(as in mini) RPG of some sorts (with the basic movements, attacking, a world to add the character, some enemies i guess (which I have a feeling i might need to learn some AI programming), nothing too fancy, something basic).

So how do I tackle 3d game development with this goal? I've learned of OpenGL and OGRE and even Unity(but it needs c# and i'm planning to take this path using c++).
Which would be the path that would give me results much sooner, assuming that I just have the upcoming Christmas break to learn some coding and get something up and running.

I plan on adding some of the 3d content with those free 3ds max models.

I honestly don't expect myself to make some next-gen Elder Scrolls games, especially with the short timeframe I have (which is about 10 days in total, assuming the the days before xmas and new year have been slashed out).


How will I tackle basic 3d game development now? Cheers.

PS: I've been wondering if there was any c++ counterpart for Unity, is there any at all?

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For the most part, 3D is 2D with an additional dimension - which means there's quite a bit more math involved and rendering gets extremely technical as a consequence. The ideas behind most general game-related concepts (AI, collision detection, resource management) don't really change much except to accommodate different spatial representations.

Since you don't have a ton of time and wish to, at least, create something instead of spending the entirety of break reading, your best bet is probably to roll with Ogre. While their source presentation can be an eyesore, their actual tutorials are excellent and their wiki is chock full of resources that you can use. Just keep in mind that Ogre isn't billed as a game engine; it's only there to render things. That said, it comes with some useful utilities (resource management and animation in particular) that should let you create something reasonably quickly. Find some free Ogre models, pirate some shaders, plug in the terrain engine, steal a few heightmaps, and enjoy yourself.

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