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dpadam450

Casual vs Dress interview


26 posts in this topic

I have an interview for a new game job. In every job I have had I have worn a tie etc. Was wondering how many people here do that, and how many you have seen / interviewed people that do that. Not really worried or stressing like some people, just wondering if I am the only one that actually will dress up since I feel it is respectable and its a high paying job (not Burger King).
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Depends on the place. I got one job in denim cargo shorts and an XKCD t-shirt. It was a ballsy move in mid summer which I don't recommend in the general case. Extremely unprofessional and too much risk of creating a bad impression. On the other side, you're probably better off not wearing a suit. In our peculiar industry, it falls into the 'trying too hard' stage and brings unnecessary attention to your ridiculous attire. I've heard stories of people being mocked for it [i]years[/i] afterwards, friendly but annoying.

Khakis (eg Dockers) and a collared T-shirt in good condition (not wrinkly/messy) are a pretty safe bet for the vast majority of tech jobs, particularly in the games industry. "Business casual" is the goal.
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Wear a nice version of what you would normally wear to work. Be careful not to overdress, it can give the impression that you don't know the industry you are trying to get into. In the games industry, and I guess in many "creative" industries, casual wear is the norm, so showing up in a suit and tie when your interviewers are wearing T-shirts and jeans will certainly make you stand out, but in a bad way, and can make the interviewer question whether you know anything about the position/workplace. On the other hand, don't underdress either: Wear nice, clean clothes, maybe go out and buy some new.

If I was being interviewed for a game development job I would wear jeans and a (dress) shirt, but absolutely not a tie. Be yourself and let your clothes reflect who you are. And if in doubt, do as Telastyn suggests and ask your contact person, it shows interest and keenness.
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[quote name='dpadam450' timestamp='1323039619' post='4890520']
I have an interview for a new game job. In every job I have had I have worn a tie etc. Was wondering how many people here do that, and how many you have seen / interviewed people that do that. Not really worried or stressing like some people, just wondering if I am the only one that actually will dress up since I feel it is respectable and its a high paying job (not Burger King).
[/quote]

For every interview I've been on, I always ask what dress is appropriate. Ask the recruiter or whoever has booked the interview for you. For everything in the games industry, the response has always been 'jeans and tshirt is fine' - so I usually go polo shirt + cargo pants. I've never seen anyone interview with a tie, and it would definitely stick out and make you look uninformed.

I always ask. Always. It doesn't hurt to ask, and you get certain confirmation.
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If it's a games job (below executive level), wear smart casual.
If it's a non-games job, then wear something similar to what the jobs require ([i]if it's a collar and tie kind of place, wear a collar and tie[/i]).

At a games company, dressing up too much is the same as wearing a sign that says "[i]I'd make a great [b]business [/b]programmer, I LOVE ENTERPRISE UML LAYERED FRAMEWORKS!!![/i]" or "[i]I just graduated, please train me![/i]"...
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[quote name='Promit' timestamp='1323042280' post='4890532']
I got one job in [u][b]denim cargo shorts[/b][/u] and an XKCD t-shirt.
[/quote]

[url="http://www.jorts.com/"]JORTS!!![/url]
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In general, dress 1 level above what their employee dress code specifies. If the code is casual (shorts and t-shirt) then go business-casual (slacks/khakis or a nice pair of jeans and a button-up shirt/polo/sweater depending on climate), if its business casual wear a suit if you have one, if its formal, wear your best suit ensemble.

This simple rule displays that you are serious, but not so overdressed to be mistaken for covering over other shortcomings, or being a tool.

I recently converted from contract to FTE at Microsoft, its casual here so I went business-casual for most of my loop. I met with my manager's manager on the second day, and I went up a half-step or so (dress shirt under a cashmere sweater, still jeans though).
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To be completely honest, I haven't accomplished much with casual. I generally try to present me as they would meet in the office every day. This didn't do the trick so I'm going to have a dress ... I'd rather stay away from the tie, but I've been specifically instructed to get one. I should practice with it...
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For interviews it is always a full suite for me. Your appearance is the first thing that they see, you want to give the most professional image possible.
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[quote name='Bregma' timestamp='1323094352' post='4890710']
Go naked... so when you produce a pen to fill out forms or do tests they won't think you're creepy.
[/quote]
Thanks for the mental image friend.
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Don't wear a tie. Dress up slightly but be comfortable because depending on the type of interview you might be up at a white board for multiple hours.
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[quote name='phantom' timestamp='1323120883' post='4890838']
Speedos.
[/quote]

Just say putting on clothes took too long, so you optimized them out. You could probably mention it's a multi-threaded speedo too.
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[quote name='MajorTom' timestamp='1323121963' post='4890846']
Just say putting on clothes took too long, so you optimized them out. You could probably mention it's a multi-threaded speedo too.
[/quote]

Interviewer: Really? What's the thread count?
You: 800
Interviewer: Nice! Can you start Monday?
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[quote name='alnite' timestamp='1323125304' post='4890876']Interviewer: Really? What's the thread count?
You: 800
Interviewer: Nice! Can you start Monday?
[/quote][img]http://www.dilbert.com/dyn/str_strip/000000000/00000000/0000000/000000/00000/5000/600/5652/5652.strip.print.gif[/img]

Unfortunately, the interviewer thread gets blocked. First available slice for producing an answer scheduled Sunday, 18 o'clock.
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[quote name='alnite' timestamp='1323125304' post='4890876']
[quote name='MajorTom' timestamp='1323121963' post='4890846']
Just say putting on clothes took too long, so you optimized them out. You could probably mention it's a multi-threaded speedo too.
[/quote]

Interviewer: Really? What's the thread count?
You: 800
Interviewer: Nice! Can you start Monday?
[/quote]

Wrong. It'd be more like, OVER 9000!!!111

Seriously though, just wear something that you're comfortable in. I know if I went to an interview in a formal dress and a tie I would feel awkward. And your interview partner will immediately figure that out. I'd just wear a clean pair of jeans, a collared shirt, some nice pair of shoes. Don't forget to shave and get a fresh haircut ;)
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Well I was just curious what the ratio is since my feeling is maybe 10% of people would wear a tie. Since they offered to take me to lunch when I arrive, it would be retarded to be the only person dressed up. Otherwise I was still going to do a tie.
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Not once have I worn a suit at an interview (nor do I own a suit) and yet I still managed to get most of the jobs I applied for. I'm far from being a pro in anything, but I do believe your frame of mind matters more when you are doing interviews. For instance, I never get high strung about [b]not[/b] getting the job; therefore, I don't get consumed by thoughts of performance, whether I'm wearing the right attire, or become overly self conscious. If you are able to have relaxed Q&A session and able to demonstrate that you are a down-to-earth person (and have the right qualifications), you will be looked upon more favourably. Remember that employers don't just scrutinise your skills, they also asses whether you fit-in their work culture. More importantly, [b]you are also interviewing them[/b]. Of course, this not applicable for every job out there, but it's something to think about. For instance, recruiting agencies will most likely look out for candidates that fit the dressy stereotype.
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Always dress up. Always. However, know the environment you work in. If you're applying to a programmer job, wearing a suit might be overkill.

A tie, dress shirt and dress slacks might suffice.
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Personally, I'd never wear jeans to a job interview, no matter what. The farthest I'd feel comfortable dressing down is a polo shirt and khakis; anything less than that, and I'd feel like [i]I [/i]wasn't taking the interview seriously, no matter what the interviewer him/herself thinks.
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