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CryoGenesis

Does this stand for anything?

14 posts in this topic

Hello, my gamedev.net name is CryoGenesis but you can call me Gen. Im new to the forum and i wanted to ask you something?

Does this stand for anything?
Im 13 years old.
I first started to get into computers during the start of last summer break, when my xbox 360 died and I was stranded trying to find a way to entertain myself. Because the Xbox was broken i decided to take a look into it and find out what all the bits were and what they all did. By then i had learnt how a computer works, how to make logic gates from Transistors and design my own ALU from scratch. by then i had found programming and all its complicated goodness. I wanted to learn Java but I was told that it would be too complicated for me to use as I had NO experience with programming whatsoever.


At the start of summer I was dragged to a dodgy countryside holiday involving hikes etc. To do something productive I spent that week learning Ruby using "The little book of ruby". By the end of that week i knew the language and what programming was and meant in general.

When i came back from the trip i decided to take a look at C++ in which I found to be a complicated syntax and was pulled away rudely interupted by Visual Basic. I learnt that for a while and decided that i should make a game which failed miserably. Straight after the failure i decided to learn Java. This involved 6 books in a period of 2 months. By the end of the two months I had made 3 games. 2 of which I was proud of at the time. One of the games involved messing with things called elements in which combining or heating/cooling the elements would change its natural state. The other was more of a webtoy than a game which was made to aid me with the design of electronic logic. It featured logic gates and so many spaces that you could design an entire cpu inside the game. The electronic logic game featured 20 different components with 100*100 spaces per layer with 19 layers equalling 19000 available spaces for components.

Since then I have bought the book "Killer game programming in java" and am on my way to making my first game that has an actual story to it. It is a 2D Rpg being made Completely by me without any help.
I have read through the A level computing book with ease and plan to take my Computer Studies GCSE a year early along with my Computing A level. Im trying to build a portfolio in which I hope will either help me get into university or get a job.
What I want to know is will all this previous experience mean anything when trying to get into the industry or get noticed?

other info:
The 2D RPG I am making has a deadline of May next year in which I hope will be fun and interesting for people to play.
I have already worked with a team of people and have certain organisation and leadership skills.

Thanks for reading.

Gen.
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It's not a bad start, but you'll need some pretty highly polished and completed - and most importantly [i]fun[/i] - projects to show off.

But it sounds like you have plenty of time before you need to worry about job placement, so I'd say just carry on :-)
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You are on the right track.

Heres some advice with the prog. languages:
Ruby: Good.
Java: Good, but skip this for now until you have learnt C++. Finish your RPG first, then go back to C++.
Visual Basic: Ignore.
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[quote name='ApochPiQ' timestamp='1323130735' post='4890915']
It's not a bad start, but you'll need some pretty highly polished and completed - and most importantly [i]fun[/i] - projects to show off.

But it sounds like you have plenty of time before you need to worry about job placement, so I'd say just carry on :-)
[/quote]

Thanks, thats the main reason for making the RPG. Just so I can make something fun and unique to play.
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[quote name='alnite' timestamp='1323130769' post='4890916']
You are on the right track.

Heres some advice with the prog. languages:
Ruby: Good.
Java: Good, but skip this for now until you have learnt C++. Finish your RPG first, then go back to C++.
Visual Basic: Ignore.
[/quote]


Thanks for the advice. I'll take a look at C++ when ive finished the RPG. It seems that most big game companies use C++...
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[quote name='alnite' timestamp='1323130769' post='4890916']
You are on the right track.

Heres some advice with the prog. languages:
Ruby: Good.
Java: Good, but skip this for now until you have learnt C++. Finish your RPG first, then go back to C++.
Visual Basic: Ignore.
[/quote]

I'd disagree with this, If he is allready successfully making games using Java then he can keep on using it, There is little reason to learn C++ before Java, (It might have been a good idea 10 years ago when you had to write your own native graphics library to get decent performance in a Java game but these days there are plenty of libraries that does this allready that one can choose from.

That said, It is still a good idea to learn C++ at some point since it is widely used in some parts of the industry. (Allthough with the growth of the mobile market Java(Android) and C#(WP7) might very well become more important to know for most game developers than C++ and given the OPs young age it is very hard to say what language will be most important by the time he is ready to enter the industry, either way he will probably learn tons of languages before then.
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[quote name='SimonForsman' timestamp='1323132072' post='4890927']
I'd disagree with this, If he is allready successfully making games using Java then he can keep on using it, There is little reason to learn C++ before Java, (It might have been a good idea 10 years ago when you had to write your own native graphics library to get decent performance in a Java game but these days there are plenty of libraries that does this allready that one can choose from.

That said, It is still a good idea to learn C++ at some point since it is widely used in some parts of the industry. (Allthough with the growth of the mobile market Java(Android) and C#(WP7) might very well become more important to know for most game developers than C++ and given the OPs young age it is very hard to say what language will be most important by the time he is ready to enter the industry, either way he will probably learn tons of languages before then.
[/quote]

So you disagreed and agreed that he should learn C++?
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[quote name='alnite' timestamp='1323136972' post='4890945']
So you disagreed and agreed that he should learn C++?
[/quote]

I believe he disagreed with prioritizing C++ over Java. I'd tend to agree. There is very little reason to start with C++, especially when he has probably 8 years before he'll be doing any sort of professional software development. Hell, in 8 years C++ might be in a similar place to where Assembly was 10 years ago if not where it is now.
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[quote name='way2lazy2care' timestamp='1323141586' post='4890965']
I believe he disagreed with prioritizing C++ over Java. I'd tend to agree. There is very little reason to start with C++, especially when he has probably 8 years before he'll be doing any sort of professional software development. Hell, in 8 years C++ might be in a similar place to where Assembly was 10 years ago if not where it is now.
[/quote]

I wasn't prioritizing C++. There are plenty of things that can be learnt from using C++ which could benefit him when using Java. Memory allocation/deallocation, memory management, pointers, deep copy/shallow copy, understanding what a "string" really is (and why it's immutable). It's a complement to Java (and other languages too).


Too many times I see Java programmers doing this:

[code]
for(...) {
for(...) {
Foo foo = new Foo(new Bar(new Omg()));
String wow = "omg" + foo.toString() + " more concatenation awesomeness " + foo.getBar().toString();
}
}[/code]


Before he gets too comfortable with Java that learning C++ becomes too cumbersome, it's better to start early. He can always come back to Java if he wants to.
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[quote name='alnite' timestamp='1323146248' post='4890982']
I wasn't prioritizing C++. There are plenty of things that can be learnt from using C++ which could benefit him when using Java. Memory allocation/deallocation, memory management, pointers, deep copy/shallow copy, understanding what a "string" really is (and why it's immutable).[/quote]
:|

You don't really need to know any of those things except deep vs shallow copies to make a Java app. That's exactly why you should learn Java first.

std::strings aren't even immutable in C++ iirc, so I'm not even sure why he'd learn that other than encouraging him to fuck up his programs with huge gaping security holes to learn the lesson that Java makes some things safer and easier. It's like trying to teach someone to ride a bicycle by putting them on a unicycle on a tightrope.
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[quote name='CryoGenesis' timestamp='1323131796' post='4890925']
Thanks for the advice. I'll take a look at C++ when ive finished the RPG. It seems that most big game companies use C++...
[/quote]
Depends on what exactly you're interested in. Game companies (or tech companies in general) use a whole range of languages to create their products and services, from the obvious C++ and Java, to languages like Phython, ActionScript, Lua and SQL.
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If you want to be in the industry, start making games. Make lots of them. Make sure you actually FINISH them, completely. If you start making games now and don't stop till you're out of college, you'll have a solid portfolio and a lot of experience and I wouldn't think you'll have a hard time getting a job.

The other thing you can do is start networking. Get involved with IGDA meetups and go to some Game Development conferences or seminars if you can (students usually get a good price or free). If you start meeting people now and showing them your portfolio, then you'll have solid contacts for when you start looking for jobs in a few years.

I'd disagree with any advice that would keep you from actually completing games. Don't worry about languages, APIs, tools, just make finished games. Don't worry about what will look good on your resume or be interesting to game companies, all that stuff will change over the next decade. What's important is that you enjoy making games and that you get good at it in any language.

Learning new tools and skills is easy. Showing an employer you have a demonstrated passion and experience and perseverance by having a really solid portfolio is not.
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[quote name='ChurchSkiz' timestamp='1323262845' post='4891425']
If you want to be in the industry, start making games. Make lots of them. Make sure you actually FINISH them, completely. If you start making games now and don't stop till you're out of college, you'll have a solid portfolio and a lot of experience and I wouldn't think you'll have a hard time getting a job.

The other thing you can do is start networking. Get involved with IGDA meetups and go to some Game Development conferences or seminars if you can (students usually get a good price or free). If you start meeting people now and showing them your portfolio, then you'll have solid contacts for when you start looking for jobs in a few years.

I'd disagree with any advice that would keep you from actually completing games. Don't worry about languages, APIs, tools, just make finished games. Don't worry about what will look good on your resume or be interesting to game companies, all that stuff will change over the next decade. What's important is that you enjoy making games and that you get good at it in any language.

Learning new tools and skills is easy. Showing an employer you have a demonstrated passion and experience and perseverance by having a really solid portfolio is not.
[/quote]

Hi, thanks a lot for the reply!

Its taking me a long time to make this game due to the fact I have to make all the graphics myself but I plan to finish it by may/june next year :)
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[quote name='CryoGenesis' timestamp='1323301034' post='4891645']
Its taking me a long time to make this game due to the fact I have to make all the graphics myself but I plan to finish it by may/june next year :)
[/quote]
If you don't want to be an artist, try not to focus on the graphics. Either come up with game designs where the graphics are simple (like geometry wars), or just use stand in graphics and once you're finished look for an artist to make some art for you. If you have a functioning game that just needs art you should have no problem finding someone to help somehow.
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[quote name='way2lazy2care' timestamp='1323351245' post='4891774']
[quote name='CryoGenesis' timestamp='1323301034' post='4891645']
Its taking me a long time to make this game due to the fact I have to make all the graphics myself but I plan to finish it by may/june next year :)
[/quote]
If you don't want to be an artist, try not to focus on the graphics. Either come up with game designs where the graphics are simple (like geometry wars), or just use stand in graphics and once you're finished look for an artist to make some art for you. If you have a functioning game that just needs art you should have no problem finding someone to help somehow.
[/quote]

I was thinking the same thing but I have decided not to focus on my limitations. The graphics LOOK fine but it does take me along time to make them because im VERY inexperienced when making pixel art.
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