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Bladelock

Is it normal to try different tools and libraries as a beginner?

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Hi, for the past few months, I've been trying different tools to make games, from the popular ones to the less known others.

I've been trying different game dev tools and libraries. Most of them I stop using because they're too cumbersome to use, or have poor documentation (It really feels like a lost cause for me if something looks potentially powerful and promising, but doesn't have enough decent workable tutorials that are easy to set up. In the end, I can't use/harness the power it may have), cannot be used easily with c++(which is one of my first criteria), or simply doesn't seem to be popular enough for people to support, use, and improve it.

So i've been trying this library, dumping this tool, etc. I don't think I have the liberty of saying which tools I have tried and rejected in this post since I wouldn't want to cause unnecessary troubles in the forums and have quarrels with people who May have benefited from the tools I ditched.

Is this trying and ditching of tools normal for a beginner? Is it a good thing? I'm still trying to find the tool that works for me,especially after I read the gamedev journal article that said that the tools one uses matters a lot.


PS:
Right now, I'm learning OGRE so that eventually, when I tackle whipping up a basic barebones 3rd person combat game (I believe that it's the combat aspect of the RPG, the part of RPGs that i want to build in the meantime) and then whip up some Bullet physics just for the collision detection and some sound output (SFML? it seems like the simplest solution for me atm), so that I can hopefully finish my game by around January/Feb next year.

My goal really is to have some RPG game (well more of the combat/hack&slash aspect of the genre) made with C++. Is it a fairly feasible goal given the deadline I've given myself (assuming that I already have all the art assets I need)?

Cheers! smile.gif

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Hi, for the past few months, I've been trying different tools to make games, from the popular ones to the less known others.

I've been trying different game dev tools and libraries. Most of them I stop using because they're too cumbersome to use, or have poor documentation (It really feels like a lost cause for me if something looks potentially powerful and promising, but doesn't have enough decent workable tutorials that are easy to set up. In the end, I can't use/harness the power it may have), cannot be used easily with c++(which is one of my first criteria), or simply doesn't seem to be popular enough for people to support, use, and improve it.

So i've been trying this library, dumping this tool, etc. I don't think I have the liberty of saying which tools I have tried and rejected in this post since I wouldn't want to cause unnecessary troubles in the forums and have quarrels with people who May have benefited from the tools I ditched.

Is this trying and ditching of tools normal for a beginner? Is it a good thing? I'm still trying to find the tool that works for me,especially after I read the gamedev journal article that said that the tools one uses matters a lot.


PS:
Right now, I'm learning OGRE so that eventually, when I tackle whipping up a basic barebones 3rd person combat game (I believe that it's the combat aspect of the RPG, the part of RPGs that i want to build in the meantime) and then whip up some Bullet physics just for the collision detection and some sound output (SFML? it seems like the simplest solution for me atm), so that I can hopefully finish my game by around January/Feb next year.

My goal really is to have some RPG game (well more of the combat/hack&slash aspect of the genre) made with C++. Is it a fairly feasible goal given the deadline I've given myself (assuming that I already have all the art assets I need)?

Cheers! smile.gif

Yes, it is fairly normal to try different tools, even experienced developers evaluate new tools from time to time.

As a beginner 3 months is a really short time to make a complete game, even if it is a fairly simple one, especially if you're unable to work fulltime on it, ofcourse it also depends on what your exact requirements are.

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[quote name='Bladelock' timestamp='1323513084' post='4892477']
Hi, for the past few months, I've been trying different tools to make games, from the popular ones to the less known others.

I've been trying different game dev tools and libraries. Most of them I stop using because they're too cumbersome to use, or have poor documentation (It really feels like a lost cause for me if something looks potentially powerful and promising, but doesn't have enough decent workable tutorials that are easy to set up. In the end, I can't use/harness the power it may have), cannot be used easily with c++(which is one of my first criteria), or simply doesn't seem to be popular enough for people to support, use, and improve it.

So i've been trying this library, dumping this tool, etc. I don't think I have the liberty of saying which tools I have tried and rejected in this post since I wouldn't want to cause unnecessary troubles in the forums and have quarrels with people who May have benefited from the tools I ditched.

Is this trying and ditching of tools normal for a beginner? Is it a good thing? I'm still trying to find the tool that works for me,especially after I read the gamedev journal article that said that the tools one uses matters a lot.


PS:
Right now, I'm learning OGRE so that eventually, when I tackle whipping up a basic barebones 3rd person combat game (I believe that it's the combat aspect of the RPG, the part of RPGs that i want to build in the meantime) and then whip up some Bullet physics just for the collision detection and some sound output (SFML? it seems like the simplest solution for me atm), so that I can hopefully finish my game by around January/Feb next year.

My goal really is to have some RPG game (well more of the combat/hack&slash aspect of the genre) made with C++. Is it a fairly feasible goal given the deadline I've given myself (assuming that I already have all the art assets I need)?

Cheers! smile.gif

Yes, it is fairly normal to try different tools, even experienced developers evaluate new tools from time to time.

As a beginner 3 months is a really short time to make a complete game, even if it is a fairly simple one, especially if you're unable to work fulltime on it, ofcourse it also depends on what your exact requirements are.
[/quote]

Around how long will it take to create a 3rd person "game" whose objective is to slash the only enemy critter in the map with a sword? I'm only interested in making the character move around with a run animation and just kill something.

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this whole tool pschology is powerfull from any aspect.
I can tell you from my musician and sound designer point of view, that the more I'm invested in one tool, the more it's hard for me to change it.
it becomes like an organ for me. and definitely the more I invest in one tool the more job I get done.

however it reinforces my composition. I realize each tool brings something else out of me.
so from the creative aspect, learning different tools is crucial, and in the long run increase creative potential.

so my suggestion is to invest in a tool that works for you, like you said, that gets the job done (and since you'er a programmer that's plenty).
but keep in mind other tools and explore them, so when a "right tool" comes along you could harness it for your behalf. I don't know how often programmers do that.

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Check out my blog (in my sig), for a simple game i made that uses SFML and chipmunk-physics for the 2d physics library. The game is a top-down action game, and there's the typical bullet class, and I show how to use chipmunk-physics to handle all the movement and collision.

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