Jump to content
  • Advertisement
Sign in to follow this  
jfalstaff

ID3D10Texture2D vs. ID3D10Texture3D

This topic is 2437 days old which is more than the 365 day threshold we allow for new replies. Please post a new topic.

If you intended to correct an error in the post then please contact us.

Recommended Posts

Is there a distinction between the two? The online docs at MS give pretty much the exact same description for both interfaces, but doesn't say if/when one is better used over the other.

The tutorial in the SDK uses ID3D10Texture2D, but also doesn't make it clear as to why this interface is used over ID3D10Texture3D.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Advertisement
A 2d texture stores pixel data in two dimensions (i.e. a regular image), whereas a 3d texture stores pixel data in three dimensions (i.e. a 3d volume grid).

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Hidden
What are some game titles that use 3D volume texturing? Would fallout 3 or the Mass Effect series be any of them? I like the look of faces in those games, though I think facial expressions in the ME series left a lot to be desired.

Share this post


Link to post
"3D volume grid" was the most helpful part of all that typing you did. The rest I pretty much already gleaned from the names of the interfaces.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I liked your pre-edit reply better... No need to be a smart-arse about it -- that's what the distinction between the two is, a 2d array of values vs a 3d array of values...

For common surface texturing, you'll use 2d textures for the majority of the time. Usually 3d textures are used as "data storage" for special look-up-tables, etc, rather than as "images".

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

No need to be a smart-arse about it -- that's what the distinction between the two is, a 2d array of values vs a 3d array of values...


But that offers up nothing that can't be surmised from the names. I did mention that none of MS's doc or tut sources gave any value of one over the other.


For common surface texturing, you'll use 2d textures for the majority of the time. Usually 3d textures are used as "data storage" for special look-up-tables, etc, rather than as "images".
[/quote]

At least from "3D volume grid" I was able to determine from google that it applies to medical imaging and creating shadow effects.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
You don't use 3D textures for cube maps, you use a 2D texture array with 6 sides.

Like Hodgman said, 3D textures are usually used for very special-case scenarios. Another example might be if you were implementing irradiance volumes, and you wanted per-vertex or per-pixel sampling and filtering of the irradiance data.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Sign in to follow this  

  • Advertisement
×

Important Information

By using GameDev.net, you agree to our community Guidelines, Terms of Use, and Privacy Policy.

We are the game development community.

Whether you are an indie, hobbyist, AAA developer, or just trying to learn, GameDev.net is the place for you to learn, share, and connect with the games industry. Learn more About Us or sign up!

Sign me up!