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trying to get a job in another country

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Hi, I was wondering about the procedure of applying for a job in the game industry in another country.
I live in israel and there aren't any major game development companies here. I was thinking of trying my luck someday in the us or Canada (or possibly Europe).
My question is how do you start interviewing for a position in a different country? is it common to have interviews over skype or something like that? or do you actually have to stay for like a month in the country and try to get as much interviews as you can? also do you think game companies will hire someone from abroad? I mean why would they start messing with visa and stuff when they can hire someone local.

I want to hear your thoughts.

Thanks,
Amit

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I went through a lot of reading on this matter, as i am currently in the same boat. Germany is not exactly the industrys heaven, we only got a good bunch of very small companys.

As for working in a different country, it depens a lot on your skills. If you are good at your field, and have something to show your skills, then its possible that someone is going to give you a hand with relocating. If you dont have much to show, then make more. If you lack the skills as an Artist or Programmer, and want to start in QA, then you got a problem. Without any good contacts or expirience, its extremly unlikley that someone is going through all the visa and relocation work for you.



Make your resume/CV and Cover Letter shine, and fire it out. Only way to know for sure is to try, hard. Thats propably the safe route.
Or, go the crazy way, obtain a work visa in the US, pack some stuff, sell everything else, fly over and nock at doors.


In any way, there is only one thing that can stop you, and that is yourself.

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the US is that country that have more companies of videogames in the world I think that its the best choise

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Thanks, I don't really have a lot of experience at game programming. I made one simple android game as part of a game design course and I'm working on something new now.
I have a degree in software engineering and have been working as a professional software engineer for the past year.

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Well, first off, do you have the relevant experience to perform professional work in a game development studio? Second, where is your CV and why haven't you put it up here so we can look at it?
As for your other questions:

[color="#1C2837"]

1) I live in israel and there aren't any major game development companies here. I was thinking of trying my luck someday in the us or Canada (or possibly Europe).


[color="#1C2837"]

2) how do you start interviewing for a position in a different country?


[color="#1C2837"]

3) is it common to have interviews over skype or something like that?


[color="#1C2837"]

4) do you actually have to stay for like a month in the country and try to get as much interviews as you can?


[color="#1C2837"]

5) do you think game companies will hire someone from abroad?


[color="#1C2837"]

6) why would they start messing with visa and stuff when they can hire someone local.

[/quote]
1) OK. Are you ready to move?
2) You apply just like a national would, by finding a job opening and sending out your CV. Through contacts. Etc. -- Tom's got this pretty well covered.
3) Depends. It happens, but if they want to interview you, they will probably want to do it in person. Reasoning for this is that an interview is to get to know you and your skillset firsthand -- a phone interview can happen, sure, but personal interview face-to-face are much more common before pushing ahead and actually signing an agreement. This is another part of the screening process that happens after you've fished around with your CV or picked up a contact.
4) Moving is something you'll have to do either way once you've gotten the position, so sure -- it's easier for them if you move first. But that can be hard in terms of getting a VISA etc. without a job lined up, so it depends on your background and what your options are.
5) Yes.
6) Because that person demonstrates exceptional skill that they are willing to import; why else?

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2) how do you start interviewing for a position in a different country?
3) is it common to have interviews over skype or something like that?
4) do you actually have to stay for like a month in the country and try to get as much interviews as you can?
5) do you think game companies will hire someone from abroad?
6) why would they start messing with visa and stuff when they can hire someone local.
7) I'm sorry but the FAQ didn't help one bit,
8) I wanted to hear people's opinions.[/quote]
2. You probably don’t. Because, as it says in the FAQs, you need to be local, especially if you’re looking for an entry-level position.
3. No, it isn’t common, especially for entry-level positions.
4. No. You need to move permanently, before applying.
5. No, as it says in the FAQs, I don’t.
6. They won’t. Unless they can't find anyone local, or the candidate is exceptional and has valuable experience and credentials.
7. I’m sorry and surprised to hear you say that. Because I’m certain these questions were addressed therein.
8. The FAQs contain opinions, based on much actual experience in the game industry.

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I am currently living in austria. I am only 16 but i want to jump into games industry after studying.
Are there any good video game companies in austria/germany?
If I, only hyphotetical, would´ve developed a mmo or a good indie shooter in my leisure time, how would this increase my chance in getting a job in the USA or a foreign country?

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I am currently living in austria. I am only 16 but i want to jump into games industry after studying.
Are there any good video game companies in austria/germany?
If I, only hyphotetical, would´ve developed a mmo or a good indie shooter in my leisure time, how would this increase my chance in getting a job in the USA or a foreign country?


Your chances quite increase when you've created and finished a game.
However, mentioning something along the lines of "I'm working on an MMO" is a good way to get laughed out of the door.
Take a look at the Help Wanted forum and the general reactions posted to 'MMO' threads.

Don't worry about the 'getting a job' part for now. You're young and still have a ton to learn.
Get good at what you do first, worry about getting a job later.

And read the FAQ, all your questions are covered in much greater detail there.

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I am currently living in austria. I am only 16 but i want to jump into games industry after studying.
Are there any good video game companies in austria/germany?
If I, only hyphotetical, would´ve developed a mmo or a good indie shooter in my leisure time, how would this increase my chance in getting a job in the USA or a foreign country?


But why did you have to hijack my post? you can start your own.

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[quote name='IceBreaker23' timestamp='1323848481' post='4893755']I am currently living in austria. I am only 16 but i want to jump into games industry after studying.
Are there any good video game companies in austria/germany?
If I, only hyphotetical, would´ve developed a mmo or a good indie shooter in my leisure time, how would this increase my chance in getting a job in the USA or a foreign country?


But why did you have to hijack my post? you can start your own.
[/quote]

sry about this :)
i didn´t thought about it.
The best thing is to create your own game and then you have something to show in your portfolio.

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I have read Tom Sloper’s articles on this subject (especially on moving to Japan, since that is where I live), and while I feel most of it is pertinent, I have only worked overseas, from entry-level to current, and I feel I have some more information to consider.

1) I live in israel and there aren't any major game development companies here. I was thinking of trying my luck someday in the us or Canada (or possibly Europe).
2) how do you start interviewing for a position in a different country? 3) is it common to have interviews over skype or something like that?
4) do you actually have to stay for like a month in the country and try to get as much interviews as you can?
5) do you think game companies will hire someone from abroad?
6) why would they start messing with visa and stuff when they can hire someone local.
8) I wanted to hear people's opinions.[/quote]


#1: This is the kicker. If we assume you are only looking at America/Canada, and some parts of Europe, then everything Tom Sloper has said is completely accurate. Your chances are slim unless you live there already, and it is unlikely you can live there unless you have a job there already or you saved enough money and are willing to take the chance on losing all of that money while still finding nothing.

Instead, even if your goal is America, why not take a valuable detour? Your chances of getting a job in a country where English is not the native language are much higher.
There are game companies in Malaysia and Thailand. Look up Lumai Prod and Sanuk Games. These countries are also cheap living, so going there on a 2-month vacation is not much of a big deal. Go vacation, apply for jobs, win. Yes, this even works for entry-level positions.

For other countries such as Hong Kong, you will find them seeking overseas employees frequently on www.jobsdb.com.

This is probably the most important thing to point out. Non-English-speaking countries do frequently hire from abroad.


#2, #3: Yes, it is done frequently via Skype. My interview with Morgan Stanley was done via Skype from outside the country. The first interview was just a phone interview, then the next 2 were via Skype. I got a job in Hong Kong via Skype interview, but while waiting too long for visa issues to get cleared up, I was offered an immediate job in Tokyo, and was again interviewed via Skype.
I have interviewed 4 times for out-of-country companies via Skype.


#4: That depends on the country. I mentioned that as a good method for countries such as Thailand and Malaysia, maybe even Hong Kong. But I have also had interviews to companies in Japan and France that were done via Skype. I simply applied online and didn’t have to go anywhere.
But the chances are almost always higher if you are actually in the country, and you should do everything you can to maximize your chances.


#5: Yes, unless they are countries that already speak English natively.


#6: Because you speak English and the locals don’t.


#8: Most of the advice people give you makes it seem hopeless. They come from English-speaking countries and are so close to the English language they never stop to consider that English in itself could be your advantage. It never was for them, so when you ask #5 or #6, they never consider that English would be the reason a company would hire you from overseas.

My ultimate goal was Japan. I knew I needed to be in the country to search for jobs, but with my savings I would be able to stay in Japan for only 2 weeks, or Thailand for 2 months. Realistically, I knew my skills were not competitive enough for Japan at that time anyway.
I started in Thailand (I am from America) with a 2-month vacation.
No experience, but I had personal projects to show, and I didn’t ask for a hefty American wage (which you don’t need unless you are living in America).
And I spoke English.

I only had to apply at one place to get a job in game programming.


My goal was still Japan, although I later worked in France.
I made it a point to make as many Japanese contacts as I could, and it finally paid off when one of them asked me to be the head of their emerging iPhone department.
Interview was just a formality, and was done via Skype, as had some of my previous interviews been.

And I shipped off to Japan, which was my goal all along.

I just quit my last job in favor of an R&D position in a major game company in Tokyo. Want to know one of the requirements for the position? English.
They even posted that they don’t care if you speak no Japanese, or if you even live outside of Japan. They would have imported me had I been living elsewhere and passed the Skype interview.


Yes companies do hire from abroad.
Yes even if you aren’t actually in the country, but only very rarely (and if they have any applications on the stack who are local, even with fewer skills, they will get first shot at the job).
But you may have a better chance if you are willing to put it off for a while as you gain experience.
Use English to your advantage and get a job in a country where you will be “happy enough” for just a few years, and then you can consider America and friends a more realistic goal afterwards.

Trust me when I say that traveling the world is a blast. No other country was my goal except Japan, but I still had fun living in them, temporarily.


L. Spiro

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Thanks you for your reply, it was very helpful, this is exactly the sort of replies I wanted to get when I posted my question.

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