Jump to content
  • Advertisement
Sign in to follow this  
CodeFree

Absolute Beginner

This topic is 2433 days old which is more than the 365 day threshold we allow for new replies. Please post a new topic.

If you intended to correct an error in the post then please contact us.

Recommended Posts

How's it going guys, i'm new here, however i've been reading things on this forum for a while.

So, i've always been eying game programming & development, however I never knew where to start, really. I was reading a few threads on here, but the questions asked and answered aren't really what i'm needing.

To start it off: What's the best language to learn? (I've only really learned HTML, and that's good for nothing)
Are there any pre-requisites to learning this? (If not; are there any recommended?)
How long does it usually take for the average guy to pick this language up?
What's the best books for this language/pre requisite?
How exactly does the programming work with game development? (Nooby question, I know)
Let's say i'm a game programming master( [; ) Where would I go from there?
Can you create software with the language you learn for developing games?
I appreciate any answers or feedback, thank you [:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Advertisement
What's the best language to learn? (I've only really learned HTML, and that's good for nothing)[/quote]
Answer: There is no best language. Everyone will tell you differently depending on who you ask. But i guess the most common ones would be C#, Java, Python, BASIC and so on. Try finding a language you feel appeling for you. It isnt wise to start c++ if your a beginner.

Are there any pre-requisites to learning this? (If not; are there any recommended?)[/quote]
Answer: Stubborness and a computer.

How long does it usually take for the average guy to pick this language up? [/quote]
Answer: No one can say. Depends on how much time your willing to put into it.

What's the best books for this language/pre requisite? [/quote]
Answer: Most "Beginning with {Insert Software language here}" is good in the start.

How exactly does the programming work with game development? (Nooby question, I know)[/quote]
Answer: I actually dont understand the question

Let's say i'm a game programming master( [; ) Where would I go from there?[/quote]
Answer: If you were. Then its entirely up to you. Basicly you would already know the answer to it.

Can you create software with the language you learn for developing games?[/quote]
Answer: Yes.

Basicly you could get the same answers from the stickies. Edited by Zorerk

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
[color="#1C2837"] Hi there, welcome to gamedev.net.

So, addressing each question individualy:

What's the best language to learn?
I would personally recommend C++.
Some people would disagree and say it's too hard to start. I don't really think so, but if you want you can also try java, C# or pascal.

Are there any pre-requisites to learning this?
There are no pre-requisites, but it's always nice to have some math background. The rest depends on what you want to do.

How long does it usually take for the average guy to pick this language up?
If you only look at it from time to time, it will problably take you a month or two to make text games a little bit decent.
It will take a lot more to master the language, but that you learn programming.
For graphical games, it depends a lot in the API you choose and in what you want to do. Just go one step at a time and worry about graphics later.


What's the best books for this language/pre requisite?
You can find most of the stuff you need for free on the web, just google it. (Sorry, I'm not much of a book reader)

How exactly does the programming work with game development?
You are telling the game what happens and what to do.
For example: While on a battle, If player attacks Then enemy takes damage

Let's say i'm a game programming master.Where would I go from there?
I'm still a student, so I can't really help you on this one. You can make games and write books, I guess.

Can you create software with the language you learn for developing games?
Sure.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

How's it going guys, i'm new here, however i've been reading things on this forum for a while.

So, i've always been eying game programming & development, however I never knew where to start, really. I was reading a few threads on here, but the questions asked and answered aren't really what i'm needing.


FAQ
Wiki
[editted to be less snarky]

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
To start it off: What's the best language to learn? (I've only really learned HTML, and that's good for nothing)[/quote]

You'll find many opinions on the best first language. Python is considered somewhat easy for beginners, some will argue that learning C++ is good because it is the most common language in professional work, C# has the XNA game development framework which is very newbie friendly, ect. I personally tend to recommend C# with XNA because many new developers manage to produce something that resembles a 2D game rather quickly with XNA (at least compared to other frameworks).


Are there any pre-requisites to learning this? (If not; are there any recommended?)[/quote]
Some math skills will help. It's good to at least understand algebra and trigonometry for 2D games; some more advanced math is useful in 3D programming. Other than that, the ability to think logically and plan is important.

How long does it usually take for the average guy to pick this language up? [/quote]

It's hard to define "the average guy" as well as "pick up a language". I learned most of the "language" of c++ in less than a month, but it took me many months of continuous practice to become decent at designing and producing well written programs. Further, it took me about a year before I understood the details of compilation and linking well. You can learn all the keywords and rules in a month or two, but that doesn't make you a good programmer; you need to learn good programming practices, how to keep your code clean and maintainable and how to design systems as well - that is something you are never "done" doing

What's the best books for this language/pre requisite? [/quote]

I made a list of resourced I found useful when I was learning C++ and C# in this blog post; if you decide to go with C# and XNA, look at the books and link related to those in that post.

How exactly does the programming work with game development? (Nooby question, I know)[/quote]

Programming creates the logic of the game. Almost anything that's not related to creating art and audio assets is done with programming at some level.

Let's say i'm a game programming master( [; ) Where would I go from there?[/quote]
You would probably want to find some other good programmers to work under you and some artists to form a team then produce fantastic games with them.

Can you create software with the language you learn for developing games?[/quote]

Yes. Programming languages that can make games can be used to produce other kinds of applications.

Good Luck.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
You guys are such a big help! Thanks for all the useful information, I think i'll start with C# or C++

I'll see you all around the forums.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
What's the best language to learn?
[color="#1C2837"]I would personally recommend C++.[color="#1C2837"]

Some people would disagree and say it's too hard to start. I don't really think so, but if you want you can also try java, C# or pascal.[color="#000000"][/quote]


I personally fully agree with this statement. Learning something as strict and versatile C++ well is a very good way to start. It teaches you how to become disciplined and write good code. It's a lot better to start with a widely-documented, difficult language with tutorials everywhere such as C++ than to jump into Python and try to translate all of that to C++.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

What's the best language to learn?
[color="#1C2837"]I would personally recommend C++.[color="#1C2837"]

Some people would disagree and say it's too hard to start. I don't really think so, but if you want you can also try java, C# or pascal.[color="#000000"]


I personally fully agree with this statement.
[/quote]

Too bad you (are both) completely and utterly wrong. I hate to use such strong and definitive language for something on the internet or that has to do with programming; take that for the strong language it's meant to be.


Learning something as strict and versatile C++ well is a very good way to start.
[/quote]

No, it's been shown time and again to be a very horrible, slow, error prone way to start.


It teaches you how to become disciplined and write good code.
[/quote]

Bullshit. C++ is horrible specifically because it does not teach you to write good code. It promotes you doing voodoo programming (because beginners don't know the root cause of things, because the error messages are horrible). It promotes 'not invented here syndrome' (due to tiny standard library). It promotes lack of automated testing (due to horrible testing frameworks, because the language has no introspection capability). It promotes horrible, incorrect code due to all of the horribly old/out-of-date/broken tutorials out there.

C++ defines undisciplined, garbage code.


It's a lot better to start with a widely-documented, difficult language with tutorials everywhere such as C++ than to jump into Python and try to translate all of that to C++.
[/quote]

No. It's better to learn how to program. Just because you used that nail gun doesn't mean you made a cheap house, it just means you didn't waste a ton of time dicking around with a hammer like a noob.


Thinking that C++ is a vaguely decent language is bad enough. Suggesting to beginners to start using it is harmful and negligent.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

[quote name='Zac' timestamp='1323820568' post='4893672']
What's the best language to learn?
[color="#1C2837"]I would personally recommend C++.[color="#1C2837"]

Some people would disagree and say it's too hard to start. I don't really think so, but if you want you can also try java, C# or pascal.[color="#000000"]


I personally fully agree with this statement.
[/quote]

Too bad you (are both) completely and utterly wrong. I hate to use such strong and definitive language for something on the internet or that has to do with programming; take that for the strong language it's meant to be.


Learning something as strict and versatile C++ well is a very good way to start.
[/quote]

No, it's been shown time and again to be a very horrible, slow, error prone way to start.


It teaches you how to become disciplined and write good code.
[/quote]

Bullshit. C++ is horrible specifically because it does not teach you to write good code. It promotes you doing voodoo programming (because beginners don't know the root cause of things, because the error messages are horrible). It promotes 'not invented here syndrome' (due to tiny standard library). It promotes lack of automated testing (due to horrible testing frameworks, because the language has no introspection capability). It promotes horrible, incorrect code due to all of the horribly old/out-of-date/broken tutorials out there.

C++ defines undisciplined, garbage code.


It's a lot better to start with a widely-documented, difficult language with tutorials everywhere such as C++ than to jump into Python and try to translate all of that to C++.
[/quote]

No. It's better to learn how to program. Just because you used that nail gun doesn't mean you made a cheap house, it just means you didn't waste a ton of time dicking around with a hammer like a noob.


Thinking that C++ is a vaguely decent language is bad enough. Suggesting to beginners to start using it is harmful and negligent.
[/quote]

That's quite the biased statement.
You make such a bold claim saying that he is "completely utterly wrong" when in actuallity, the content in his post is entirely subject to opinion. There are no facts revolving around his post or yours. When someone says "It's been proved time and time again," but then fails to reference any sources, it's usually a red flag that he/she is pulling shit out of his/her rear end. You know what they say, 97% of statistics are made up on the spot.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
[color="#1C2837"]
[color="#1C2837"]How exactly does the programming work with game development? (Nooby question, I know)[color="#1C2837"][/quote]
[color="#1C2837"]
[color="#1c2837"]you will program an "engine" like a program named "unity3d" or "unreal Sdk engine" to manange the inputs, GUI and 3d possitions in the scenary so lets go to your question....
[color="#1c2837"]
[color="#1c2837"]I will give you an example in C#:http://pastebin.com/idQ0kyGr[color="#1c2837"]
[color="#1c2837"]
[color="#1c2837"]source: http://tinyurl.com/7tqokgm
[color="#1c2837"]
[color="#1c2837"]So read the commentaries after "//" and it will explain the algoritm of each script I hope you to know at least a bit of programming cause It will help you to adapt to any language of programming if you feel like coding all from zero is too hard just try using an engine which is what Im doing right now and engines are good too for example "portal 2" was made with "source engine" so dont think that if you use an engine your game will be of bad quality or some sort of that good luck and have fun wink.gif

unity3d tutorial: http://tinyurl.com/4y2xgyv

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Sign in to follow this  

  • Advertisement
×

Important Information

By using GameDev.net, you agree to our community Guidelines, Terms of Use, and Privacy Policy.

We are the game development community.

Whether you are an indie, hobbyist, AAA developer, or just trying to learn, GameDev.net is the place for you to learn, share, and connect with the games industry. Learn more About Us or sign up!

Sign me up!