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pedrohm

Super beginner

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Hello

I'm super new to programming. But I want to learn it with the intention to make games.
Since I'm tottaly new, I have no clue how things work, what else I have to learn, which language to choose. I was hoping someone could answer my questions.

I used to do video effects stuff, but then I decided to try programming. AFAIK you need to know math and physics as good as a engineer if you want to take it seriously, is that right?

Sorry if I posted this on the wrong category, still getting used to the forums.

Thanks in advance!

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You do not need to have mathematics or physics knowledge at the level of an engineer to create a game. You need that level of knowledge if you wish to create a game engine (3D mainly). If you want to make a game and don't really have an interest in "reinventing the wheel" as they call it and instead producing a playable game then I would suggest using an existing game engine. You will have to learn to use the scripting language that the engines use and it will certainly help if you have the knowledge of a programming language like C++/Java/Python/etc.

Here are a couple of well known ones which have a free SDK version:
http://udk.com/
http://unity3d.com/

Both have great documentation an a active community.

Hope that helps!

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And I'm screwed, because all good games I've seen so far have their own engines. Except skyrim.

LF2, minecraft, liero, worms, all uses unique engines AFAIK. I'll stick to c++ then, mainly because I want to recreate the liero engine. This means I'll have to get good grades in math and physics in school, right? I'm still 17, started editing videos at 11, made some bucks making intros/outros for people on youtube.

What scares me is the math, I know some people that do what I used to do, it doesn't require you to know anything, you can life off it without knowing math at all.

Thanks!

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And I'm screwed, because all good games I've seen so far have their own engines. Except skyrim.


You sure about that?

http://pc.ign.com/articles/114/1144412p1.html

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retro, read these:
http://www.gamedev.net/index.php?app=forums&module=forums&section=rules&f=31
http://www.gamefromscratch.com/post/2011/08/04/I-want-to-be-a-game-developer.aspx

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First off, welcome to the forum!

Second, the place to start will be choosing a language. Python and C# are popular choices for beginners, so you might want to look into those.

Third, at this stage in your programming education, the word "engine" should not be in your vocabulary. Once you've got the very basics of your programming language of choice down you may want to do work that will involve one, but even then your goal should not be to create or reproduce an engine. Novice level skills in programming and software design will not be sufficient to succeed, and you won't have much to show for your effort at any point which can be discouraging.

As posted above, use an existing engine rather than rolling your own when thr time comes. Don't worry that every game seems to use its own engine. That premise is incorrect on the one hand, and irrelevant in the other. If you want to make a Worms clone, you can do it with tools freely available even though the original game may have used different ones than you.

Fourth, don't worry about the math and physics. The kinds of games you want may need those, but if you're still in high school then you probably won't need to worry about linear algebra just yet. For the simpler games you would make while learning, you definitely do not need to be a professional level mathematician or physicist.

Fifth, be prepared to start small and advance slowly. You won't be making Skyrim for sure, but there's still a lot of ground to cover from beginner to tetris. Programming is a complicated and deep skill, and to develop it to any non-trivial level is going to be a marathon, not a sprint.

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[quote name='retro disco' timestamp='1324833464' post='4897302']
And I'm screwed, because all good games I've seen so far have their own engines. Except skyrim.


You sure about that?

http://pc.ign.com/ar.../1144412p1.html
[/quote]

Skyrims engine pretty much runs on top of Gamebryo (Which is also a game engine), and it also uses tons of other middleware.

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