Jump to content
  • Advertisement
Sign in to follow this  
kronus980

Java Game Programmer

This topic is 2533 days old which is more than the 365 day threshold we allow for new replies. Please post a new topic.

If you intended to correct an error in the post then please contact us.

Recommended Posts

Advertisement
That all depends on how you define "good." In reality, there are a few good places to start. My personal suggestion is to start learning the language first. As a general rule of thumb, you should "start small and progress gradually." Once you know the language, you can start making simple text-based games (like card games, simple adventures, etc.). Then once you feel comfortable with the concepts, move on to graphics and, again, start simple. Print something to the screen, move it around using keys, etc. etc. I think it's pretty self explanatory.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I think nowadays java isn´t a language for games. I am currently running a project for a simple action game in java with AWT, and the main menu(only a few buttons) is rendered with 60 fps only! I would recommend C# or C++.

If you say: "But I want to learn Java" then you should start with the basics as boogyman said.
Furthermore you have to be really patiently cause noone just starts game programming. First comes normal programming.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I think nowadays java isn´t a language for games. I am currently running a project for a simple action game in java with AWT, and the main menu(only a few buttons) is rendered with 60 fps only!


Why not? Java isn't quite as popular as C++ in the game industry, sure, but let's not forget about Minecraft, for example. Minecraft is hugely successful and it's written in Java.

Also, why could you only get it to render at 60 FPS? This seems strange.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
60 fps is plenty - users will not be able to see any visual difference above this frame rate. The frame rate is probably vsync capped anyway. Either way, it is not a conclusive argument against using Java for games.

Generally one does not use AWT for games (unless they are the kind that lend themselves particularly to such a "standard" GUI, or a prototype). There are many libraries or frameworks which allow you to use Java with something like OpenGL for rendering.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Java is the language used for Android apps (along with XML for the manifest file) -- I just started learning Java too, to eventually develop Android games.

Check out these tutorials from Oracle (the developers of the Java language, if I'm not mistaken). I'm using these, and it's coming along great. It helps to have a bit of background in some other language to use these tuts, though:

http://docs.oracle.com/javase/tutorial/

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

[quote name='IceBreaker23' timestamp='1325440029' post='4898711']
I think nowadays java isn´t a language for games. I am currently running a project for a simple action game in java with AWT, and the main menu(only a few buttons) is rendered with 60 fps only!


Why not? Java isn't quite as popular as C++ in the game industry, sure, but let's not forget about Minecraft, for example. Minecraft is hugely successful and it's written in Java.

Also, why could you only get it to render at 60 FPS? This seems strange.
[/quote]

That seemed weird to me too. I think the problem is that there are 5 images which are getting scaled real time. I need to improve this^^



60 fps is plenty - users will not be able to see any visual difference above this frame rate. The frame rate is probably vsync capped anyway. Either way, it is not a conclusive argument against using Java for games.

Generally one does not use AWT for games (unless they are the kind that lend themselves particularly to such a "standard" GUI, or a prototype). There are many libraries or frameworks which allow you to use Java with something like OpenGL for rendering.


We are only using AWT, because in our school we only learn standard java and I hope the performance of AWT does it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

We are only using AWT, because in our school we only learn standard java and I hope the performance of AWT does it.
[/quote]
That is OK. But it is not an excuse to claim "java isn´t a language for games", because that cannot logically follow from your experience* with a single API.

* [size=2]And not to be mean, but I could just as easily say "relative inexperience" here, as you are still learning.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I want to thank you guys for the replies. I know the language at about a novice level, and those are great examples for me to start. What I need help with are handling resources, such as sounds, images, 3D models, and loading and playing sounds. I already have input covered.

I think nowadays java isn´t a language for games. I am currently running a project for a simple action game in java with AWT, and the main menu(only a few buttons) is rendered with 60 fps only! I would recommend C# or C++.

If you say: "But I want to learn Java" then you should start with the basics as boogyman said.
Furthermore you have to be really patiently cause noone just starts game programming. First comes normal programming.

I find nothing wrong with java for games. The only difference I see in java and C/C++, is that java isn't officially supported on consoles, other than rumored performance differences.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I wrote a Zelda clone in Java using the "

Beginning Java SE 6 Game Programming" book by Harbour. It covers creating a 2D game engine in Java using Java2D. For a more detailed book with better error detection and better full screen performance check out the

"Developing Games in Java" Brakeen book. His website also has same code you can check out to get an idea of what you need to know. Finally, the most in depth and largest Java game programming book I have read and is "Killer Game Programming".

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Sign in to follow this  

  • Advertisement
×

Important Information

By using GameDev.net, you agree to our community Guidelines, Terms of Use, and Privacy Policy.

GameDev.net is your game development community. Create an account for your GameDev Portfolio and participate in the largest developer community in the games industry.

Sign me up!