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      GameDev.net and CRC Press have teamed up to bring a free ebook of content curated from top titles published by CRC Press. The freebook, Practices of Game Design & Indie Game Marketing, includes chapters from The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, and An Architectural Approach to Level Design. The GameDev.net FreeBook is relevant to game designers, developers, and those interested in learning more about the challenges in game development. We know game development can be a tough discipline and business, so we picked several chapters from CRC Press titles that we thought would be of interest to you, the GameDev.net audience, in your journey to design, develop, and market your next game. The free ebook is available through CRC Press by clicking here. The Curated Books The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, Second Edition, by Jesse Schell Presents 100+ sets of questions, or different lenses, for viewing a game’s design, encompassing diverse fields such as psychology, architecture, music, film, software engineering, theme park design, mathematics, anthropology, and more. Written by one of the world's top game designers, this book describes the deepest and most fundamental principles of game design, demonstrating how tactics used in board, card, and athletic games also work in video games. It provides practical instruction on creating world-class games that will be played again and again. View it here. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, by Joel Dreskin Marketing is an essential but too frequently overlooked or minimized component of the release plan for indie games. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing provides you with the tools needed to build visibility and sell your indie games. With special focus on those developers with small budgets and limited staff and resources, this book is packed with tangible recommendations and techniques that you can put to use immediately. As a seasoned professional of the indie game arena, author Joel Dreskin gives you insight into practical, real-world experiences of marketing numerous successful games and also provides stories of the failures. View it here. An Architectural Approach to Level Design This is one of the first books to integrate architectural and spatial design theory with the field of level design. The book presents architectural techniques and theories for level designers to use in their own work. It connects architecture and level design in different ways that address the practical elements of how designers construct space and the experiential elements of how and why humans interact with this space. Throughout the text, readers learn skills for spatial layout, evoking emotion through gamespaces, and creating better levels through architectural theory. View it here. Learn more and download the ebook by clicking here. Did you know? GameDev.net and CRC Press also recently teamed up to bring GDNet+ Members up to a 20% discount on all CRC Press books. Learn more about this and other benefits here.
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Jaap85

Moving from Visual Basic.net?

4 posts in this topic

hello everybody,

About six months ago i picked up game programming as a hobby again after a period of approximately 12 years. The last thing i programmed in was GWBasic :)

Quite a lot has happened in the last twelve years. Since i didn´t really know where to start, i started with Visual Basic.Net, for the only reason that the name sounded vaguely familiar to GWBasic. In the past six months i created a few small games (Tic tac toe, 2d sidescroller, 2d maze with AI opponent). I am currently thinking about my logical next steps. I am mostly interested in the technical side of game development, especially AI, and don't care much about the graphical side (i love to play Dwarf Fortress for example ;-)

I am wondering whether i should specialise further in VB.net or start learning another language like C# or Python. Therefore i have a few questions i would like to ask you:

1. Why does almost nobody use VB.Net? Is is not suited for game programming?

2. Should i move to another language or continue using VB.Net?

3. If i should move to another language, given my interests and experiences, which language would suit me better? Python or C#? Or maybe another language?

I am very interested to hear from you. Thank you very much in advance!
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Generally the problem is, VB.NET is just C# in a fat suit.

Sticking to VB.NET wont harm you, as you will be able to switch to C# in just a few days tops they are so similar. That said, C# is more popular and the most supported ( book, samplewise, etc... ) so really, why bother with VB.net



Frankly, VB.net was just created to transition VB coders to .NET. Now that that was 10 or so years in the past, there is very little reason for it to exist any longer.
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1. Why does almost nobody use VB.Net? Is is not suited for game programming?
No programmer wants to be labeled a [url="http://www.codinghorror.com/blog/2007/11/mort-elvis-einstein-and-you.html"]Mort [/url]so that's why you won't see anyone using it and even if they do they'll deny it [img]http://public.gamedev.net//public/style_emoticons/default/laugh.png[/img]
It doesn't help that Microsoft treats VB.Net as 2nd class language, for example XNA supports C# but not VB.Net, Microsoft code samples written for C# not VB.Net etc.


2. Should i move to another language or continue using VB.Net?
You should use what you are most efficent and comfortable with. If you plan on doing anything graphical or move into 3D this may mean switching to C# but as mentioned VB.Net is so similar to C# that there are automated tools that will convert 99% of your code unlike VB6 to VB.Net conversion tools from Microsoft that never worked and probably another reason quite a few programmers dumped VB.Net since they were VB6 programmers that got pissed off at Microsoft for breaking backwards compatibility.
In the past i.e. VB6 days it was easier finding books, code examples, online help for VB so that's why it was the #1 used Microsoft language for a long time. Now Microsoft is putting all the same effort into C#/XNA so that's what most will choose and stick with for the foreseeable future.

3. If i should move to another language, given my interests and experiences, which language would suit me better? Python or C#? Or maybe another language?
Personally, I've made games in both Python and C# and I like both langugages so you can't go wrong picking either one. You'll pick up C# quicker though since C# is pretty similar to VB.Net and if you've invested any amount of time in learning the .Net framework classes you can still keep using them. Also, as I said above it's now easier finding books, code examples, online help for C#/XNA than VB.Net and even Python these days so that can only help [img]http://public.gamedev.net//public/style_emoticons/default/biggrin.png[/img]

P.S. I also used to make games in VB and VB.Net and it was actually easier and funner than C# due to better Visual Studio intellisense and
[b] [url="http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ba77s56w.aspx"][size=4]Edit and Continue (Visual Basic)[/size] [/url][/b]

support but since there is no longer any Directx/XNA support for it I use C#/C++ exclusively on Windows nowadays.
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Speaking about the 3rd question, If you want to keep on developing PC games, you may choose one of high-level languages, like C# or Java.
But if you going to switch to mobile or consoles, I will recommend you to choose C++, it is a little bit harder, than C#, but it is more professional
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