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sargento

Where to start? C++/SDL/OpenGL?

11 posts in this topic

Hello. I have become very interested in game programming development. I am interested in making cross platform games but primarliy for linux. However I would like the games to be able to run on Windows/OsX as well. I have been dabbling in python and have some experience with C++.

I guess my question is where to start? It is a bit overwhleming to choose which languages I should be learning. For exmaple should I be learning SDL or OpenGL and C++? I also have no idea where a good reference to learn is, wether it be books or websites.

Any input would help.
Thanks for reading,
Tony
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For starting procedures of programming I would say go for the fastest language now that would be Binary/X86 Assembly but all in all most people in todays walks of life like most indie game companys/game companys Use C++ Programming Language for the speed and then use OpenGL for Cross Platform 3D Rendering,etc and SDL For Window Management.


There is other alternatives like using Win32 API ,QT Creator Kit ,freeGlut for Window Managements but I would personally guide you towards C++,SDL,OpenGL and to start you off in the right direction go for Lazy Foo Tutorials for SDL education and OpenGL your going to have to spam google and search through books and beg on irc if you want to learn anything its rather difficult otherwise for C++ learning watch thenewboston tutorials in C++ [img]http://public.gamedev.net//public/style_emoticons/default/smile.png[/img]

Hope this helps

for an IDE use Code::Blocks or Microsoft Visual Studio 2010 express free edition for C++
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I have actually done quite a bit of pygame tutorials and have a basic understanding of the pygame modules. I am looking more towards 2d graphics right now as I am not much of an artist. Also I use linux as my native operating system so if anybody could reccomend a nice IDE for C++ on linux it would be greatly appreciated. Thanks for the quick responses.

Edit: Would choosing to go with more of 2d approach on the graphics change if I should learn OpenGL or SDL first?

Thanks again.
Tony
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[quote name='sargento' timestamp='1328202197' post='4908766']
Also I use linux as my native operating system so if anybody could reccomend a nice IDE for C++ on linux it would be greatly appreciated.
[/quote]
The one useful thing UnderGrowthFiler did was mention the word Code::Blocks. Personally, I really like it, and it works on Linux, OS X, and Windows.

[quote name='sargento' timestamp='1328202197' post='4908766']
Edit: Would choosing to go with more of 2d approach on the graphics change if I should learn OpenGL or SDL first?
[/quote]
Not really. If you're using SDL, you'd most likely end up using OpenGL for graphics anyway.
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Thanks again for the responses. Greatly appreciated Cornstalks. Questions have been answered and now it is time to learn and experiment. Have a good day!

Tony
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So far as drawing stuff is concerned, 2D is just a special case of 3D. if you keep this in mind it will help you a lot when you encounter tutorials and info that deal primarily with 3D, and will also help you when you feel that the time has come to make the transition to 3D.

Good suggestions upthread (well, [i]mostly[/i]...) so I won't repeat them.
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Don't like the fact that I should be ignored because people like you destroy my way of learning quite frankly and everything I said was truthfull so don't know where your going at???

I was wrong on the WIN32 API and MSVC++ stuff tho so you have me there got a realization problem :(
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[quote name='UnderGrowthFiler' timestamp='1328231823' post='4908948']
Don't like the fact that I should be ignored because people like you destroy my way of learning quite frankly and everything I said was truthfull so don't know where your going at???
[/quote]
No, you're being ignored because the first piece of advice you gave was rubbish (start with x86 Assembly???). But then the advice doesn't improve much in quality. And then you unnecessarily put down Python and Pygame. You may not use or prefer them, but that certainly doesn't make them "tash" (I assume you meant "trash"). Whatever good ideas you may have had (I'll give you Code::Blocks) are surrounded by bad ideas, so of course they're getting ignored.

In addition, if you speak fluent English, I would ask you to please start using punctuation and proper sentences and grammar. If English is not your first language and you aren't fully fluent in it, then it's ok.
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I lurk these forums so much i guess this will be my first post.... I've only been programming for a few months, not sure how experienced you are but C# would be a great language to start with but Im not 100% sure if that is compatible with osX since C# is run off of the .net framework.... but if you do go with C# Oreilly labs "Head First C#" is an absolutely great book to start with, (and C# is far more user friendly than C++ is) I'm learning both at the same time, and the learning curve for C++ is far steeper than C# is..

But if you do choose the C++ route I'd personally Recommend a book called "Sam's Teach your self C++ in 1 hour a day" teaches you from the very basics to some pretty advanced topics, explains every line of code in every example, and end of each chapter even has snippets and examples for you to quiz your knowledge.

I believe that you should gain some more experience in C++ before trying to jump into DX/OGL , since DX/OGL are typically written in C/C++ and require far more experience anyhow!

I know i get extremely motivated when i see/read other peoples great work and results, but you gotta start from the ground up like every one else did!

just my .02! :D

Good luck!
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