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      Download the Game Design and Indie Game Marketing Freebook   07/19/17

      GameDev.net and CRC Press have teamed up to bring a free ebook of content curated from top titles published by CRC Press. The freebook, Practices of Game Design & Indie Game Marketing, includes chapters from The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, and An Architectural Approach to Level Design. The GameDev.net FreeBook is relevant to game designers, developers, and those interested in learning more about the challenges in game development. We know game development can be a tough discipline and business, so we picked several chapters from CRC Press titles that we thought would be of interest to you, the GameDev.net audience, in your journey to design, develop, and market your next game. The free ebook is available through CRC Press by clicking here. The Curated Books The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, Second Edition, by Jesse Schell Presents 100+ sets of questions, or different lenses, for viewing a game’s design, encompassing diverse fields such as psychology, architecture, music, film, software engineering, theme park design, mathematics, anthropology, and more. Written by one of the world's top game designers, this book describes the deepest and most fundamental principles of game design, demonstrating how tactics used in board, card, and athletic games also work in video games. It provides practical instruction on creating world-class games that will be played again and again. View it here. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, by Joel Dreskin Marketing is an essential but too frequently overlooked or minimized component of the release plan for indie games. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing provides you with the tools needed to build visibility and sell your indie games. With special focus on those developers with small budgets and limited staff and resources, this book is packed with tangible recommendations and techniques that you can put to use immediately. As a seasoned professional of the indie game arena, author Joel Dreskin gives you insight into practical, real-world experiences of marketing numerous successful games and also provides stories of the failures. View it here. An Architectural Approach to Level Design This is one of the first books to integrate architectural and spatial design theory with the field of level design. The book presents architectural techniques and theories for level designers to use in their own work. It connects architecture and level design in different ways that address the practical elements of how designers construct space and the experiential elements of how and why humans interact with this space. Throughout the text, readers learn skills for spatial layout, evoking emotion through gamespaces, and creating better levels through architectural theory. View it here. Learn more and download the ebook by clicking here. Did you know? GameDev.net and CRC Press also recently teamed up to bring GDNet+ Members up to a 20% discount on all CRC Press books. Learn more about this and other benefits here.
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speedoXunil

what i have to learn to develop a game ?

9 posts in this topic

hello,
i dont know anything about game developing and i really want to make a 3D game for PC if any one can tell me what i have to learn and do i ll be thankful.

thanks in advance
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If you know absolutely nothing, it would be a good idea to pick up a few beginner's books. Recommended languages are GML, C# with XNA, and AS3. You will NOT be able to program 3D games in a few months. This is a very common mistake people make; they think that programming is easy. It is not. You will have to start slow with 2D games first, then move into 3D.


Here's a book for XNA: [url="http://www.amazon.com/XNA-4-0-Game-Development-Example/dp/1849690669/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1328624828&sr=8-1"]http://www.amazon.com/XNA-4-0-Game-Development-Example/dp/1849690669/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1328624828&sr=8-1[/url]
I think XNA is the best way to go, but if you know nothing about programming, I suggest you use a simpler, language, like GML or AS3.

Here's a link to a really simple IDE(Integrated Development Environment) called GameMaker. It uses a language called GML. http://yoyogames.com

Annnnd... if you want to develop flash games, try this: [url="http://www.senocular.com/flash/tutorials/as3withmxmlc/"]http://www.senocular.com/flash/tutorials/as3withmxmlc/[/url]
There's a LOT of flash development tutorials on the web, you just gotta look around. You also might wanna use a library with AS3, as that greatly simplifies development.

Just remember, game development is not for the impatient, so if you get into this, be ready for some (or a lot) of frustration. I wish you luck with your learning!
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If you want make easy way 3D game, you learn 3D Game Studio or Unity or UDK...
But if you want write Directx, Opengl... You must start 2D game

i am using 3DGS if you want start tutorials here: [url="http://tutorial.3dgamestudio.net/"]http://tutorial.3dgamestudio.net/[/url]
and i learn Directx, my advice if you want make your game with Directx, firstly you must learn C++, later my advice buy Beginning DirectX 11 Game Programming book.
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if you know nothing about programing, I would recommend going and buy a C# book and start learning programing first. If you don't want to buy a book I would highly recommend checking out [url="http://www.youtube.com/user/thenewboston"]the new boston[/url] YouTube channel, he has a lot of tutorials about programing.
Then after that go and buy an XNA book to start learning game development.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=x_9lfHjYtVg
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ontop of what everyone else said, there's alot that you can't learn but must have already.

1: Patience... it'll save you thousands on monitors and keyboards.

2: Creativity... rarely ever is anything done the same way.... every project is different and will require thinking out of the box to get working.

3: Lots of experience playing games or using varies other programs.... So many times I've been stuck on a problem only to play a game and realize the solution is right in front of me. Same with writting my UI, alot of the hurdles were over come by making UML's in starUML only to notice things about it's UI, and think "why didn't I think of that", problem solved.

4: Thick skin.... everyone is going to put you down, no matter how good you are. They are always better, even if it's not true. Don't worry you'll do the same at some point.

5: Willingness to learn... Sorry but you're going to be in the dog house for a little while. You're going to have to start from the basics. ie "hello world", "your base are belong to us" and so forth. 90% of those that jump straight to graphics programming, quit programming altogether in the first month.

6: the list goes on.

Despite my distate of C# and JAVA (I'm a C++ fanboy), they are rather easy to get started in and get a program running. Things that take me a week from scratch in C++, I can have up and running in a day with C#. If it wasnt for my code base in C++ I would be using C# more often.

On top of it all... stay positive, stay happy, and have fun.
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[quote name='freeworld' timestamp='1328638291' post='4910572']

4: Thick skin.... everyone is going to put you down, no matter how good you are. They are always better, even if it's not true. Don't worry you'll do the same at some point.

[/quote]


Where have you been hanging out? I mean, the internet is a cesspit of negativity, but I find when it comes to game development, the communities are remarkably friendly, welcoming and generally helpful. I mean, there are bad seeds out there, but they are in the minority. Even when people post their works online for criticism, the results are generally quite positive.


Now, if you come in with a know it all attitude, or show signs of extreme laziness you might elicit a pile on, but generally I find people extremely tolerant, especially in a forum where frankly, it boils down to the same 5 or 6 questions over and over and over. I rarely see negativity or hostility in these forums, even in the face of "I want to make an MMO in C++, now what?" questions.

Comparing this to the general hostility I see in forums like Slashdot or if I ( heaven forbid ) ever need to get help on an Apple product ( OS zealots tend to be complete dicks ), or worse... read the comments on a YouTube or political website... this place is freaking nirvana!
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[quote name='Serapth' timestamp='1328642735' post='4910601']
[quote name='freeworld' timestamp='1328638291' post='4910572']
4: Thick skin.... everyone is going to put you down, no matter how good you are. They are always better, even if it's not true. Don't worry you'll do the same at some point.

[/quote]
Now, if you come in with a know it all attitude, or show signs of extreme laziness you might elicit a pile on,
[/quote]

I never said they're going to bash you... ok I sorta did. My appologies. I really worded it wrong. Youre quote is exactly what I was trying to get at with that one. It goes along with having the willingness to learn. What you think is right, right now, is most likely wrong. You're just going to have to suck it up and learn to learn from peoples criticism. Just because it sounds like they're being harsh, they're probably still right about what they said.

And yes theres plenty of bashing here on gamedev too, though the majority of it's aimed at trying to get someone straighted out with tough love. I've been coding for many years and I'm still learning of my mistakes, it just comes with the territory.

Just dont quit when some tells you your wrong. i would've quit from my first post here is I din't have some sort of thinck skin. My present self would've laughed off my former self.
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[quote name='Serapth' timestamp='1328640367' post='4910586']
Don't look for hand holding, don't be lazy but don't reinvent the wheel.
[/quote]

By all means, if you are looking for a place to start, start with the wheel! It makes for a good learning experience to start with something that you know you can do. There's no shame in reinventing the wheel as a learning experience. Get out there, make your own engine. It won't be pretty and it won't be easy, but you'll learn something by the end.
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