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argidev

Programmer needed for social facebook game

5 posts in this topic

Casino Life is a facebook social game, where the player is both a casino manager, and a player (for now there are just slot machines).
We have enough content created to release a beta version, and more ideas on the list.
I need an experienced AS3 programmer , preferably with database and servers knowledge.

All the members are passionate indie developers, with experience in the game industry
The project is not funded, all revenue coming from the micro-transaction that will be made once the game is up and running

We're currently formed of 3 artists and 1 sound composer, and we need a programmer to complete the team

Here's a few graphics of the current game:
[url="http://flashgameart.com/album/833/"]http://flashgameart.com/album/833/[/url]
[url="http://d4068561.deviantart.com/art/Casino-life-253861416?q=gallery%3Ad4068561%2F9412251&qo=21"]http://d4068561.devi...2F9412251&qo=21[/url]

PM me with some of your previous work, your country, hours available to work on this project and any other questions you might have
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[quote]After a month of not working on the project, the current programmer finally decided to quit the project all together and pass it's job to somebody else
I can say I'm somewhat relieved, as he barely had any time to work due to school work, so the project was moving much slower than it should have[/quote]

Don't bash people. Here's why:
[quote]but we're talking about a life time revenue[/quote]

That developer is still entitled to life-time revenue. So why should they continue to work.

If they are not entitled, then it's an empty promise. Only a contract can guarantee such revenue and nobody is going to spend their life time employed at this company.

And if contract requires "life-time" to be "the time you work for us", then it's not life-time, it's just 0.


Advertising life-time revenue also doesn't say anything. Unless you post past projects and their life time revenue so far. 0 split over life time is 0. Life time of such projects is also often measured in weeks, most of the time it's negative.

[quote]your age[/quote]

Asking for age is opening you to litigation over discrimination in several countries. It might not matter right now, but it will if you ever make money. Then, 2 years later, when you are making millions, someone can come up and say their offer wasn't considered because of age.



What you want is voluntary effort. Don't bash people who might choose to participate, you have exactly nothing to offer and rely on goodwill of others.

Most will abandon the project since they are getting precisely zero out of it.

[quote]if you had access to some sort of hosting service where we could save all the information from the players, until we can afford a dedicated host for the game[/quote]

For love of everything.... You're putting your future in hands of a random person on the internet.

What happens when it's complete and they simply move the data leaving you with nothing.

Storing player information also requires at least formal compliance with certain laws, either due to financial or privacy reasons. Never ever under any circumstances do with anything like that without strong contract and being in full legal control over all IP.

BTW: amazon, appengine, azure, heroku, .... they all offer at least basic free tier. It'll get you through first stage of development, but won't be enough for public hosting. There's plenty of free PHP hosts around as well. All of which can be managed by project owner.
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[quote name='Antheus' timestamp='1329574795' post='4914193']
If they are not entitled, then it's an empty promise. Only a contract can guarantee such revenue and nobody is going to spend their life time employed at this company.
[/quote]

Touché.
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I didn't even have to read the responses to know that this is a failed project.

If there isn't financial backing to support the project, then there isn't anyone with skin in the game. If that's the case, it's really easy to drop the project, not take it seriously, or flake out. Offering future profits as the only payment is about the worst form of payment anyone can work for since there is a very low chance that any profits will be turned and the financial risk of failure is nil. You're even asking the programmer to buy hosting space? So, anyone jumping into the project would already be working in the hole. Sounds like a really bad deal to me.
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[quote name='slayemin' timestamp='1329619543' post='4914406']
I didn't even have to read the responses to know that this is a failed project.

If there isn't financial backing to support the project, then there isn't anyone with skin in the game. If that's the case, it's really easy to drop the project, not take it seriously, or flake out. Offering future profits as the only payment is about the worst form of payment anyone can work for since there is a very low chance that any profits will be turned and the financial risk of failure is nil. You're even asking the programmer to buy hosting space? So, anyone jumping into the project would already be working in the hole. Sounds like a really bad deal to me.
[/quote]

You can make any assumtions as you want, but the first programmer that worked on thi game just made your argument invalid

I already found 3 interested programmers interested on other forums.I posted here hoping to attract more views, to incerase my chances of finding the perfect person for this job
A faield project, is a project where nobody is interested in workin, so as long as I'm not willing to give up on it, this isn't failed

As for the "future profits" problem, this is absolutely different, in any way, than any of the collaborations I made until now, with other programmers.I came up with the game design and graphics, they came up with the prigramming, we got the game sponsored on FGL and we shared the revenue.I couldn't promise them any money then either, that didn't stop them to collaborate.

The "Touché" reply is just a childish response to this entire topic.I didn't come here to argue or to insult anyone,
I just posted this, hoping to find a professional programmer to work with.
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Alright,
[quote name='argidev' timestamp='1329661276' post='4914503']
[quote name='slayemin' timestamp='1329619543' post='4914406']
I didn't even have to read the responses to know that this is a failed project.

If there isn't financial backing to support the project, then there isn't anyone with skin in the game. If that's the case, it's really easy to drop the project, not take it seriously, or flake out. Offering future profits as the only payment is about the worst form of payment anyone can work for since there is a very low chance that any profits will be turned and the financial risk of failure is nil. You're even asking the programmer to buy hosting space? So, anyone jumping into the project would already be working in the hole. Sounds like a really bad deal to me.
[/quote]

You can make any assumtions as you want, but the first programmer that worked on thi game just made your argument invalid

I already found 3 interested programmers interested on other forums.I posted here hoping to attract more views, to incerase my chances of finding the perfect person for this job
A faield project, is a project where nobody is interested in workin, so as long as I'm not willing to give up on it, this isn't failed

As for the "future profits" problem, this is absolutely different, in any way, than any of the collaborations I made until now, with other programmers.I came up with the game design and graphics, they came up with the prigramming, we got the game sponsored on FGL and we shared the revenue.I couldn't promise them any money then either, that didn't stop them to collaborate.

The "Touché" reply is just a childish response to this entire topic.I didn't come here to argue or to insult anyone,
I just posted this, hoping to find a professional programmer to work with.
[/quote]

Let me clarify what I meant by "failed project". It hasn't failed [i]yet.[/i] I think it's going to fail in a few months based on some of the hints your post gave about the project management. You've found three interested programmers now. Since you're not going to be able to pay them, the only thing that's going to keep them working on the project is their interest. Can you guarantee that they'll be fully interested through the entire project lifecycle? Can you keep your programmers to the end without paying them? What's to prevent the programmers from moving on to a different project which will pay them? It's going to be a big project management challenge which is going to have to rely on your team spirit, leadership charisma, and project progress.

But, having a history of successful project completions goes[i][b] miles [/b][/i]to attest to your project management skills and team dedication. You should mention that next time you post. If you guys have the will power and the dedication to see this project through to completion, no matter how hard or boring it gets, then it will get done and you should cautiously ignore my pessimism. Good luck and best wishes on your project!
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