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      GameDev.net and CRC Press have teamed up to bring a free ebook of content curated from top titles published by CRC Press. The freebook, Practices of Game Design & Indie Game Marketing, includes chapters from The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, and An Architectural Approach to Level Design. The GameDev.net FreeBook is relevant to game designers, developers, and those interested in learning more about the challenges in game development. We know game development can be a tough discipline and business, so we picked several chapters from CRC Press titles that we thought would be of interest to you, the GameDev.net audience, in your journey to design, develop, and market your next game. The free ebook is available through CRC Press by clicking here. The Curated Books The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, Second Edition, by Jesse Schell Presents 100+ sets of questions, or different lenses, for viewing a game’s design, encompassing diverse fields such as psychology, architecture, music, film, software engineering, theme park design, mathematics, anthropology, and more. Written by one of the world's top game designers, this book describes the deepest and most fundamental principles of game design, demonstrating how tactics used in board, card, and athletic games also work in video games. It provides practical instruction on creating world-class games that will be played again and again. View it here. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, by Joel Dreskin Marketing is an essential but too frequently overlooked or minimized component of the release plan for indie games. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing provides you with the tools needed to build visibility and sell your indie games. With special focus on those developers with small budgets and limited staff and resources, this book is packed with tangible recommendations and techniques that you can put to use immediately. As a seasoned professional of the indie game arena, author Joel Dreskin gives you insight into practical, real-world experiences of marketing numerous successful games and also provides stories of the failures. View it here. An Architectural Approach to Level Design This is one of the first books to integrate architectural and spatial design theory with the field of level design. The book presents architectural techniques and theories for level designers to use in their own work. It connects architecture and level design in different ways that address the practical elements of how designers construct space and the experiential elements of how and why humans interact with this space. Throughout the text, readers learn skills for spatial layout, evoking emotion through gamespaces, and creating better levels through architectural theory. View it here. Learn more and download the ebook by clicking here. Did you know? GameDev.net and CRC Press also recently teamed up to bring GDNet+ Members up to a 20% discount on all CRC Press books. Learn more about this and other benefits here.
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iFengo

Where can I learn C++

6 posts in this topic

I've been wanting to get started on programming, but every tutorial site I go to is very monotonous and boring. Are there any interactive sites that can keep me engaged to learn C++? [img]http://public.gamedev.net//public/style_emoticons/default/smile.png[/img]
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i used thenewboston's tutorials

they are fun but he doesn't teach as much as "boring" websites do.
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There are two schools of thought here: The first is that you should grab a book and start reading. This may be monotonous and boring at times, but you get a ton of information and sometimes the author will mention corner cases that you wouldn't have thought of. The second school of thought is that you should just start programming and learn about the language as you go.

Personally I think the best way to learn a language is a mix of the two. I recommend you check out that book [url="http://www.acceleratedcpp.com/"]Accelerated C++[/url], it's not too boring because the learning curve is a lot greater than most intro books. I find that this usually holds my interested better. As you read through the book, break out your IDE and start hacking on whatever little ideas come to you.

Too much reading and not enough programming never helped anyone. Similarly, too much programming and not enough reading will leave you with errors that you don't understand.
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I recommend you:
[b]A)[/b] Grab a good heavy C++ book. One that is thorough, even if boring.
For me, this was "C++ For Dummies", but there are many similar books equally good. Make sure whatever you get was written sometime in the past 5 years.

[b]B)[/b] Grab a smaller book, one that you can skim through and use as a reference, and one that is less-boring and more 'fun'.
For me, this was a $10 "C++ Programming in Easy Steps", but there are equally crummy books available.

[b]C)[/b] Bookmark a good website where you can look up C++ standard library topics.
I suggest: [url="http://www.cplusplus.com/"]http://www.cplusplus.com/[/url]

[b]D)[/b] Bookmark a good forum with a friendly community you can come to when you're stuck.
I suggest the forums you are currently on, just be sure to use it _after_ you've tried things yourself, and _after_ you've googled.

[b]E) [/b]Regardless of what IDE the books are using, ignore them, and use Microsoft's Visual Studio if you are on Windows, or Code::Blocks as an alternative. Don't use Dev C++ which some older books recommend.

[b]F) [/b]Programming will at first always be boring. You have to push through that, and stick with it regardless. Eventually, the very things you find boring now, will be a joy to you later. Seriously. Right now, programming may seem like a means to an end, but later programming will be an end unto itself.
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If you've got the basics of the language down try my [url=http://www.gamefromscratch.com/page/Game-From-Scratch-CPP-Edition.aspx]creating a game using C++ and SFML tutorial[/url]. It's quite long at 10 chapters, but should help you learn a number of C++ concepts in a more real-world manner than most tutorials, which by their size limits are often confined to abstract ( and often confusing ) examples. So if you are sick of trying to make dogs bark() and cats meow(), check it out.
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[url="http://www.gamefromscratch.com/"]GameFromScratch.com[/url] is a very good website. Just had a glance, and very impressed :D, congrats to Serapth. Clean and nice introduction for C++ game programming with the underrated SFML. Yet to get the best of game programming tutorials you need to learn basic C++; and to understand the logic and the principles, like OOP (Object Orientation Programming), Templates, and others.

Here are some good C++ tutorials to get started
[url="http://www.cprogramming.com/tutorial/c++-tutorial.html"]CProgramming.com[/url]
[url="http://www.learncpp.com"]LearnCPP.com[/url]
[url="http://www.codingunit.com/category/cplusplus-tutorials"]CodingUnit[/url]
[url="http://www.zeuscmd.com/tutorials/cplusplus/index.php"]Zeus CMD[/url] - Warning 6 years old, but in-depth concise and easy to follow tutorials to get started. And after all this time, as relevant as it has ever been.
[url="http://www.cpp-home.com/"]CPP Home[/url]

Hope that you enjoy your new task of learning C++,as Servent of the Lord mentioned; it seem boring at first, but if you have the burning desire to learn you will excell in time. When you do pick it up, the payoff will be immeasurable and allows you to do the game programming you want to do and enjoy in doing it.

Regards
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You can learn Java before C++ so that you get used to the syntax first. Note that creating and destroying allocations may slow you down more in native C++ because you allocate memory directly from the operative system.
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