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CelticSir

Stuck - where to go in C++?

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Hey,

I have been learning C++ for some time, but most of it is console projects so its all ran in DOS. I got most of the basics understood like loops, classes, functions, references, pointers (the list goes on).

But then the tutorials ended. They never once got any thing more than how to do extreme basics, which to be honest i knew from learning other languages just had to learn some minor differences.

So then I was a bit miffed where to go from that point. I want to learn how to get graphic output rather than just text output, was a bit dissapointed with the tutorials i found.

So can some one recommend a some what more informative set of tutorials on learning this language that reaches a level of being able to program you're own basic game =/ ?

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The learning doesnt really stop, you will likely have to read different books / articles on specific areas, for graphic / game programming theres OpenGL, DirectX and various engines, depending on how much you want to learn and how much time / patience you have pick one of those. Personally I would recommend learning OpenGL / DirectX over an engine IF your aim is to learn, if your aim is to build a game and not worry about whats happening at a much lower level, use an engine and read a tutorial there.

I am not sure what you know about C++ and what you dont, so even the above suggestion may be considered bad, theres http://www.cprogramming.com/tutorial.html which covers a lot of areas of both C, C++ and even OOD

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If your goal is to get into game design asap, I recommend SFML as a next step. The tutorials on its website should get you up and running fairly quickly.

If you want to actually get a more in depth understanding of graphical programming, then OpenGL or DirectX are both good options.

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You should probably investigate this on your own based off your understanding of the language and graphics coding etc. This is basically how it was for me:

I was still in DOS when I tried to learn Glide, back when it existed. Learning C++ and Glide when I barely understood how to scope variables properly and wondered why I got an error that “i” was not defined because I had just defined it above (in the next scope deeper). I had to ditch Glide for a while and just learn the language.

When I was ready to tackle 3D again Glide was dead and it was DirectX something. At that time I didn’t even know what the :: operator meant, so everywhere I was seeing it in the DirectX code I was a little lost, but I could actually get a 3D heightmap terrain rendering by borrowing some code and adding my own ideas into it. At least I was familiar with the language to get that far even if I didn’t know what the scope operator was.

It was only for that purpose that I learned how to create a Windows® window.
I would later learn the Win32 API inside and out and also all forms of 3D graphics (Nintendo DS, Nintendo Wii, OpenGL, OpenGL ES *, Direct3D *, etc.) became very easy to understand, but that is basically how it always goes with the passage of time as long as you maintain an interest in something.


I had a few false starts because my level of experience with the language and perhaps other things that just come with the passage of time were not there yet.
If you feel comfortable enough with the C++ language maybe you can get right into DirectX and friends. It wouldn’t hurt to try anyway just to get a sneak-peak at what is to come.

Thinking back, some of my most memorable moments in my programming development were the moments that confused me the most, such as that little scope error with Glide and that :: scope operator confusion with DirectX.
When I later learned about scope of locals and the scope operator, I remembered those moments and suddenly everything fit into place. It was much easier to settle in when I later tackled them.

I would consider then that there is no reason not to just try to do what you want: 3D programming.
If you fail, who cares? Give it up for a while and keep those memories of why you gave up. Move on to the next thing that interests you and as you grow you will eventually be able to put everything together and realized why you failed before.
Then you will be ready to try again. And again it really doesn’t matter if you fail.

Don’t think so linearly. It isn’t about, “I am here, what is next?”
It is about taking all kinds of tangents and finding out for yourself what is next.


L. Spiro

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