• Announcements

    • khawk

      Download the Game Design and Indie Game Marketing Freebook   07/19/17

      GameDev.net and CRC Press have teamed up to bring a free ebook of content curated from top titles published by CRC Press. The freebook, Practices of Game Design & Indie Game Marketing, includes chapters from The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, and An Architectural Approach to Level Design. The GameDev.net FreeBook is relevant to game designers, developers, and those interested in learning more about the challenges in game development. We know game development can be a tough discipline and business, so we picked several chapters from CRC Press titles that we thought would be of interest to you, the GameDev.net audience, in your journey to design, develop, and market your next game. The free ebook is available through CRC Press by clicking here. The Curated Books The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, Second Edition, by Jesse Schell Presents 100+ sets of questions, or different lenses, for viewing a game’s design, encompassing diverse fields such as psychology, architecture, music, film, software engineering, theme park design, mathematics, anthropology, and more. Written by one of the world's top game designers, this book describes the deepest and most fundamental principles of game design, demonstrating how tactics used in board, card, and athletic games also work in video games. It provides practical instruction on creating world-class games that will be played again and again. View it here. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, by Joel Dreskin Marketing is an essential but too frequently overlooked or minimized component of the release plan for indie games. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing provides you with the tools needed to build visibility and sell your indie games. With special focus on those developers with small budgets and limited staff and resources, this book is packed with tangible recommendations and techniques that you can put to use immediately. As a seasoned professional of the indie game arena, author Joel Dreskin gives you insight into practical, real-world experiences of marketing numerous successful games and also provides stories of the failures. View it here. An Architectural Approach to Level Design This is one of the first books to integrate architectural and spatial design theory with the field of level design. The book presents architectural techniques and theories for level designers to use in their own work. It connects architecture and level design in different ways that address the practical elements of how designers construct space and the experiential elements of how and why humans interact with this space. Throughout the text, readers learn skills for spatial layout, evoking emotion through gamespaces, and creating better levels through architectural theory. View it here. Learn more and download the ebook by clicking here. Did you know? GameDev.net and CRC Press also recently teamed up to bring GDNet+ Members up to a 20% discount on all CRC Press books. Learn more about this and other benefits here.
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0
jwezorek

Setting up a project for cross-platform development

7 posts in this topic

What's the standard way of doing this? Basically I have some code that will be common between the various platforms and then will have platform-specific code for each platform. So should I have a common directory and then directories for each platform, for example?
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
There's no "one true way", but my projects tend to look something like this as far as directory layout is concerned, assuming there are platform-specific components for Mac, POSIX and Windows:

[code]
<project-name>/
include/
<project_name>/
# client headers go here

src/
# portable source and private headers go here

mac/
# mac-specific source and private headers
posix/
# posix-specific source and private headers
windows/
# windows-specific source and private headers

docs/
# docs go here.
[/code]

I've never felt the need for anything more complicated. To some extent, the layout might depend on the particulars of your build system. I can do things like this in my build scripts, which makes this layout convenient in my case:

[code]
sources = here/'src/*.cpp' + here/'src'/cfg.platform/'*.cpp'
# etc
[/code]
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
[quote name='edd²' timestamp='1331239425' post='4920497']
There's no "one true way", but my projects tend to look something like this as far as directory layout is concerned, assuming there are platform-specific components for Mac, POSIX and Windows:

[code]
<project-name>/
include/
<project_name>/
# client headers go here

src/
# portable source and private headers go here

mac/
# mac-specific source and private headers
posix/
# posix-specific source and private headers
windows/
# windows-specific source and private headers

docs/
# docs go here.
[/code]

I've never felt the need for anything more complicated. To some extent, the layout might depend on the particulars of your build system. I can do things like this in my build scripts, which makes this layout convenient in my case:

[code]
sources = here/'src/*.cpp' + here/'src'/cfg.platform/'*.cpp'
# etc
[/code]
[/quote]

I don't really have a build system per se ... just use VS2010 for Windows and plan on using XCode for Mac/iOS. I take it you build from the command line. Is there an advantage to doing this in the case of cross-platform?
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I'd suggest getting familiar with CMAKE. It's a bit convoluted to learn, but once you get it up and running it can automatically generate VS project files on Windows and Linux. I haven't used it with Mac, but I would imagine it would be able to do the same.
1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
[quote name='jwezorek' timestamp='1331240356' post='4920500']
I don't really have a build system per se ... just use VS2010 for Windows and plan on using XCode for Mac/iOS. I take it you build from the command line. Is there an advantage to doing this in the case of cross-platform?
[/quote]

Having to maintain multiple project files for various IDEs is a pain, especially if you don't have access to all the supported systems. For that reason, I have a platform/toolchain agnostic build system written as a DSL in Python. Sane people would probably use CMake instead, as Caanon suggests.

Of course, if you still use multiple IDEs, you'll have to maintain multiple project files just to make sure they all know about the new source files you add, unless they support filename globbing of some sort. I switched to Vim a few years ago and simply use sub-directories to organise 'projects' (and I now wish I had taken the time to learn it sooner, FWIW).

EDIT: I should also say that the system allows me to build my projects in a variety of ways:[list]
[*]Compilers: Visual C++ 2005, 2008, 2010. MinGW 4.2, 4.5, 4.6. Apple GCC 4.0.1, 4.2.1. Apple LLVM-GCC 4.2.1.
[*]SDKs: 3 Platform SDKs each on OSX on Windows.
[*]Build configurations: debug, optimized, release.
[*]Architectures: x86, x64.
[*]+ any combinations configuration options available for the project in question
[/list]
The build variants that arise from the combinatorial product of these 'axes' can number in the thousands(!) for some projects. I wouldn't be able to build and test all of that anywhere near as easily without having simple, platform-agnostic build descriptions. So I count that as a pretty big advantage!
1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Yes, I see what you are saying in that it will be a pain to manually maintain multiple project files. However, I'm probably going to end up working mostly on Windows and testing on other platforms, once I have platform dependent frameworks developed for them. If I'm working on Windows I'd like to be using VS2010. Is there a tool that parses a Visual Studio project and generates make files for other platforms?
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
It wouldn't surprise me if there is, but most people use things like CMake or premake, which do things the other way around i.e. generate project files of various kinds (including for Visual Studio) from an platform agnostic project description. I'd imagine it would be worth investing a few hours in learning to use one of these tools.
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Even you are mostly working in IDE, some cross platform build system is quite helpful.
I use CMake.
The build system can not only build your project, but also generate project files for IDE.
Want to work in VS? Ask CMake to generate project for VS 2010.
Want to work in Code::Block, then CMake generate the project for C::B for you.

Try to learn a build system, I prefer CMake. The hours you spend on learning the build system should be quite lower than the time you spend on manipulate different project files on different platforms for different IDEs.
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0