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BlackMusic

Criticize my music =)

5 posts in this topic

Hello colleagues!!!!
For 2+ years I've been studying how to compose orchestral music on PC =))
Here some works, made on Cubase + orchestral samples...
Need critique!)
[url="http://soundcloud.com/alex_chorny"]http://soundcloud.com/alex_chorny[/url]

(Greetings from Ukraine, btw =)))))
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I'd just like to say that these pieces you have written are very beautiful.
They manage to encapsulate the atmosphere of the setting perfectly, I can picture what you were trying to capture while you were writing very easily.

Now onto my criticism, I personally think these compositions are more suited to either films or story driven games. If you're just getting into the business of video game music and are looking to write music for simple indie games (In order to get noticed) your music could do with a bit more drive. By this I mean, focus more on rhythm and melody. Adding in more percussive sounds, making the melody stand out more (don't have too much underneath to detract from it) and Using recurring motifs here and there, are just a few suggestions at how you could achieve this.

Take a listen to the Machinarium and Aquaria soundtracks to kind of get a feel of what I mean.

Excellent work though. =)
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Agreed with above, in that they're extremely beautiful but could do well to get to some more driven parts more quickly. There's a lot of sonic exposition in War Graves, for example, before reaching the meat of the track.

I'll also add that while you use great samples and have a wonderful sense of composition, don't be afraid to mix in the space a little more. Some of your instruments sound much to up front in the mix, specifically flutes, plucked strings, or clarinet. Those instruments lean more towards wistful and mysterious, and I imagine them being more effective sitting farther away in the mix. You could accomplish this either by using less compression (if you're using any compression on the samples), or wetting the reverb on those particular tracks a little more and lowering the dry signal.

Keep up the great work man!
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You have some great ideas. Now you can add even more finesse or polish to these tracks by using some of the production techniques listed in the previous posts as well as:

- more use of volume automation. Some of your phrases just end instead of dying off slowly

- create more dynamics. There is dynamics in your music but you can do more.

- play around with tempo more. No piece of music is truly static. Add in some ebb and flow - even just a tiny amount. I think you'll find it creates a more organic performance.

- be careful of putting too much limiting on your tracks. At the end of The Sketch it sounds as if the audio is really fighting your limiter (or whatever plug-in you used) and almost distorting itself. Leave yourself some headroom (usually at least -3 dB or so) especially when uploading to Soundcloud since it converts your audio when posting.

[quote]
Now onto my criticism, I personally think these compositions are more suited to either films or story driven games. If you're just getting into the business of video game music and are looking to write music for simple indie games (In order to get noticed) your music could do with a bit more drive. By this I mean, focus more on rhythm and melody. Adding in more percussive sounds, making the melody stand out more (don't have too much underneath to detract from it) and Using recurring motifs here and there, are just a few suggestions at how you could achieve this.
[/quote]

Hmmm, well I agree and disagree on this point. [img]http://public.gamedev.net//public/style_emoticons/default/smile.png[/img] First off because in some of his music I found a great sense of melody - albeit the melodies were usually longer, more drawn out passages. Nothing wrong with that though. Mainly because I don't believe there's truly just "video game music" but I also understand that video games can (and does) lend itself to certain kinds of music. Several games (like Dead Space and Bioshock 2) show that unique and uncommon composition techniques (like aleatoric music) can work very well.

[quote]
Agreed with above, in that they're extremely beautiful but could do well to get to some more driven parts more quickly. There's a lot of sonic exposition in War Graves, for example, before reaching the meat of the track.
[/quote]

I also want to make a note on this comment: The music BlackMusic provided would be perfect in a game that requires a huge amount of time - like Skyrim for example. Also Fall Out: New Vegas features some really cool music that is very ambient and non-intrusive. Just as there are moments and places where appropriate doom-n-gloom in-your-face music cues work great - there's moments where music that is more drawn out works well. Don't fall into the trap of thinking any and all video game cues must get right to the point and always be driving.

Thanks for sharing!

Nate
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Thank you so much for your replies. They are very useful for me!
Now I'm working almost in "academic" composition. However, I'll keep practice on film/game music production!

Once again, thank you!
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Dude, these are awesome! I really like them. Great variety of timbres, very evocative and captivating melodies. I can really feel the emotion in your pieces. Very well done!

The only thing I really have to suggest was covered already, but you might want to use automatic gain control a little bit more. Not only to make some of your instruments fade away more smoothly, but also on the overall piece. I find myself wanting to hear a little *less* dynamic range between the quietest and loudest parts. I don't think you need to add compression, but maybe just manually ride the master gain a little to close the gap?

Awesome stuff, dude! Love it all!
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