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[SlimDX, SharpDX] - Installation requirements on user PC's

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I'm looking for a way to use DirectX from the .Net Framework (i.e. C#), that is not depricated (many of the options are), to play sound (but also for 3D graphics later). I need it for a program that currently installs as a zip-file having to be unpacked, and that's it! This is (probably) not the best way (the Eclipse IDE for Java actually installs this way), but that is what I have time for now, there are other things on the todo-list that are more important. In this situation, and also later, I will require the solution (for accessing DirectX) to be one or more DLL's included with my program. And that could be a problem, because on SlimDX's homepage (download) it looks like it has to be installed on user PC's as an msi. I currently cannot, and later will not, have any third party installeres running during the installation of my program.

An alternative to SlimDX is SharpDX, but SlimDX looks more mature from what I have heard, and on the face of it I would prefer to use SlimDX. Is SharpDX included in applications as DLL's?

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Both SlimDX and SharpDX can be distributed as DLL files that are places in same folder as your exe file of application. With SharpDX you have also option to integrate DLL file together with application exe file in one executable, by using ILmerge, ILrepack or other tool. Not sure if this will work with SlimDX, because it uses C++/CLI, it is not pure C# assembly.

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To get DirectX installed on A PC there are really only three options as the DirectX SDK EULA limits what you can do:

1. Direct the user to Microsoft's website to download it and install it.
2. Redistribute the DirectX installer yourself, and launch it automatically from your installer, or ask the user to run it. You could also launch it on first run of the game like Steam does.
3. Make your game work without D3DX (this makes coding significantly more complicated). This works because while there's a separate D3DX dll for each revision of the DirectX SDK, but the core components stay the same, and get installed with Windows. I don't know if there's a C# wrapper that supports this option.

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