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ekba89

Renderer Choice

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I've recently started to create a new game and now I'm trying to find what kind of renderer would be best for me. My game will include alot of lights. They will mostly be small lights used for clashes when characters are fighting or things like that. Also I'm planning lightning strikes for background which means big lights with some random intervals. So I was thinking about deferred rendering since I will have a lot of lights and I already created deferred renderer before for my previous project. But in the game there will be also transparent objects mainly the rain and possibly water. I know transparent objects are problem for deferred rendering but is it impossible to overcome this problem? Or is there any other renderer type better for my purpose?

Thanks.

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What sort of depth complexity do you expect to have in your scene? What do you expect to be static and what do you expect to be dynamic? Can the classifications for these change at design/runtime?

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If you mean how big the scene will be with complexity I'm not planning to have a very big scene. And it will be outdoor. I'm planning to have a natural scene(grass, trees etc.) and also I want my terrain and these natural elements to be destructable(so they will be dynamic i guess). I'm planning to create these elements as realistic as possible since probably there won't be much other then those(I'm working alone and I can't create 3d models :)) so they will be animated too(grass and trees I mean).

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If you mean how big the scene will be with complexity I'm not planning to have a very big scene. And it will be outdoor. I'm planning to have a natural scene(grass, trees etc.) and also I want my terrain and these natural elements to be destructable(so they will be dynamic i guess). I'm planning to create these elements as realistic as possible since probably there won't be much other then those(I'm working alone and I can't create 3d models smile.png) so they will be animated too(grass and trees I mean).

As a rule of thumb, 'complexity' refers to things like objects overlapping, whereas 'scale' talks about the direct size of things.

On-topic: Any requirement on dynamic sky lighting? Usually this goes hand-in-hand with outdoor scenes, but I obviously don't know the design goals of the game. If you can get away with it, lightmaps are still super-duper cheap and allow for very high-quality lighting. If dynamic sky/sunlight is an absolute must, then you can probably use something like the occlusion interval map technique found in GPU Gems.

Dynamic objects are a little trickier. If you know that your 'interesting' lighting cases are going to be near the camera, you might want to consider using the aforementioned precomputed lighting solution for distant terrain/objects and then use a forward or deferred rendering pipeline for things nearby. With the forward-rendering case, you can simplify the translucent lit object case tremendously while avoiding drawing a bunch of copies of the terrain/static objects. (which is something of a pathological worst-case situation for forward rendering-- terrain will generally cover a huuuge portion of the scene while lights will likely only a small portion of that-- immensely wasteful)

In general I find myself advocating the use of custom lighting solutions more and more over the 'lol, deferred' approach. You can certainly go the opposite route if you want, as there are definite workflow and maintainability benefits associated with doing so. (precisely because you don't have all this special-case logic!) That being said, you can probably get a more interesting final scene by using techniques that offer a higher bang/buck ratio. Your call, ultimately.

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First of all thanks for the advices. I'm interested in dynamic sky lighting. Yes, I know, I want a lot of stuff in the game :D but I'm not doing this for any commercial purposes. I've a lot of free time right now and want to learn and try new things. The technique you offered is very interesting I'll look into it more. Also different rendering methods for objects with different distance can work for me I guess since characters will fight near camera so I'm going to try that.

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