• Announcements

    • khawk

      Download the Game Design and Indie Game Marketing Freebook   07/19/17

      GameDev.net and CRC Press have teamed up to bring a free ebook of content curated from top titles published by CRC Press. The freebook, Practices of Game Design & Indie Game Marketing, includes chapters from The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, and An Architectural Approach to Level Design. The GameDev.net FreeBook is relevant to game designers, developers, and those interested in learning more about the challenges in game development. We know game development can be a tough discipline and business, so we picked several chapters from CRC Press titles that we thought would be of interest to you, the GameDev.net audience, in your journey to design, develop, and market your next game. The free ebook is available through CRC Press by clicking here. The Curated Books The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, Second Edition, by Jesse Schell Presents 100+ sets of questions, or different lenses, for viewing a game’s design, encompassing diverse fields such as psychology, architecture, music, film, software engineering, theme park design, mathematics, anthropology, and more. Written by one of the world's top game designers, this book describes the deepest and most fundamental principles of game design, demonstrating how tactics used in board, card, and athletic games also work in video games. It provides practical instruction on creating world-class games that will be played again and again. View it here. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, by Joel Dreskin Marketing is an essential but too frequently overlooked or minimized component of the release plan for indie games. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing provides you with the tools needed to build visibility and sell your indie games. With special focus on those developers with small budgets and limited staff and resources, this book is packed with tangible recommendations and techniques that you can put to use immediately. As a seasoned professional of the indie game arena, author Joel Dreskin gives you insight into practical, real-world experiences of marketing numerous successful games and also provides stories of the failures. View it here. An Architectural Approach to Level Design This is one of the first books to integrate architectural and spatial design theory with the field of level design. The book presents architectural techniques and theories for level designers to use in their own work. It connects architecture and level design in different ways that address the practical elements of how designers construct space and the experiential elements of how and why humans interact with this space. Throughout the text, readers learn skills for spatial layout, evoking emotion through gamespaces, and creating better levels through architectural theory. View it here. Learn more and download the ebook by clicking here. Did you know? GameDev.net and CRC Press also recently teamed up to bring GDNet+ Members up to a 20% discount on all CRC Press books. Learn more about this and other benefits here.
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0
Vfor Vikram

Design suggestions

5 posts in this topic

Hi,

I'm a hobby game programmer. I recently made a small game and put it on Kong (to get feedback and see how players respond etc).

The game is located here: [url="http://www.kongregate.com/games/MakubexFox/teleport-rush"]http://www.kongregate.com/games/MakubexFox/teleport-rush[/url]
It's 14 MB and made in Unity, so if you don't wanna wait on it you can check the screen shots on my blog
[url="http://8bitmemories.blogspot.in/2012/03/my-1st-game-on-kongregate.html"]http://8bitmemories.blogspot.in/2012/03/my-1st-game-on-kongregate.html[/url]

I'm not a designer so I need help -

1. How do i fill the environment in racing games like in my case? It feels so blank and empty with just 1 sky-box. All i can think of is some buildings.

2. Are there any tips and tricks for making levels / tracks fun? All I could think of was like turns and jumps

3. I have put fence around the tracks so that player / AI don't fall off. Is this a good idea? I wanted floating tracks and hence this issue.

Also, please feel to critique my game / design (other than sound) so that I can improve myself .

Thanks :)
1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I think the first rule when you have questions like this is to check out the competition. Look at a variety of racing games, e.g. the Need For Speed series, Trackmania, Motorstorm: Pacific Rift, some rally car games. They use things like buildings, roadworks, ramps, natural environments, destructible obstacles, uninvolved vehicles, power-ups, etc to make life more exciting. Be creative!
2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Personally, as far as fun tracks go, I like a mix. By that I mean that some tracks are designed to where vehicles that have a high top speed have the definite advantage and others are very twist, giving vehicles that handle well and accelerate quickly the advantage. I think the Gran Turismo series has a good balance of track types. Some are actual race courses that are high speed tracks and others are very tight, technical tracks. Gran Turismo 5 actually has everything from NASCAR to kart racing, so different race types is definitely something that can be considered in order to make things interesting.
2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
[size=2]Disclaimer: I haven't actually looked at your game, but from the description feel able to give input anyway.[/size]

[quote name='Vfor Vikram' timestamp='1331658319' post='4921691']
1. How do i fill the environment in racing games like in my case? It feels so blank and empty with just 1 sky-box. All i can think of is some buildings.
[/quote]
What might you find in a real environment? Pick a location for each track in your game, and fill it with things that would be in that environment. If a track is located in the city you might have buildings, trees, mail-boxes, chairs & tables, pedestrians, etc. A country track might have some cows or horses, plants, farm equipment, etc. You can also make your skybox more interesting by adding planes, birds, blimps, whatever as appropriate.

[quote name='Vfor Vikram' timestamp='1331658319' post='4921691']
2. Are there any tips and tricks for making levels / tracks fun? All I could think of was like turns and jumps
[/quote]
Think about what players can do in the game, and then design the tracks so that all of the skills are used at some point, preferably spread out. You also want some variety in the experience -- you might have a series of tight corners that really test the player's ability to steer and control their speed, followed by a straight where they really get to accelerate, and then some wider sweeping corners where they can still overtake if they take care but need to watch their steering. Things like jumps, destructable obstacles, or terrain that can slow the player down might add more variety.

Where possible, also offer the player choices: do they take the risky but shorter path, or the longer but easily driven one? Do they go over the rougher terrain to save travelling as far, or all the way around the track? This can be especially effective if there is a choice of vehicles which handle different actions better or worse.

[quote name='Vfor Vikram' timestamp='1331658319' post='4921691']
3. I have put fence around the tracks so that player / AI don't fall off. Is this a good idea? I wanted floating tracks and hence this issue.
[/quote]
You could consider using this to influence difficulty -- easy tracks (or easier [i]sections[/i] of tracks) might have a fence, whilst more dangerous tracks or sections won't. You could also have fences that can take one hit and keep a player one, but then fall off and potentially prove dangerous for following players.

If there is no fence it might become a tactic to try to hit your opponents and knock them off.
1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
[quote name='jbadams' timestamp='1331695369' post='4921862']
You could consider using this to influence difficulty -- easy tracks (or easier sections of tracks) might have a fence, whilst more dangerous tracks or sections won't. You could also have fences that can take one hit and keep a player one, but then fall off and potentially prove dangerous for following players.

If there is no fence it might become a tactic to try to hit your opponents and knock them off
[/quote]

One of my favorite tracks on Mario Kart was the Rainbow Road, where if you left the track it didn't just slow you down, you fell and were reset back to a checkpoint. This made multiplayer races lots of fun because, as you mentioned, a favored tactic was to knock/force your opponents off the track while also making single player races challenging because you had to actually drive the track and not cut corners.
1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Thanks everyone.. I had never thought about destructible objects and knocking players off before.. :)

Also, I found Hot Wheels postmortem here [url="http://blogs.unity3d.com/2012/01/26/london-unity-usergroup-8/"]http://blogs.unity3d.com/2012/01/26/london-unity-usergroup-8/[/url] which was also every useful, hope it helps someone...
1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0