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ChrisJozwiak

How long would it take to make a decent full fps? (One person team..)

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10-20 years? 15-30? an entire life time (Which the acomplishment of an entire fps now wouldn't be anything then...) Just wondering . A game like bf3.

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Depends on your experience and how much money you have to invest.
Could be done in one year or less if you are a experienced coder and pay someone to do the 3d art (would cost some thousand dollars I would expect).
If you can't pay, well, maybe you can find some artists that also want to make an fps. Your project has less chances of being finished this way though.
If you can't code, and you can't do 3d art, well, you'll have to start somewhere, but then, expect your project to take years to complete (you'll need a couple of years either in programming or art to get at a decent level)

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The complete game including art etc. ... well.. I guess that around 50-100 people work for around 3-5 years at bf3... that would be 150-500 years so, if you are really super-scotty like-supreme-uber-talented in 1 year...

The real answer would be: nobody knows, but most probably somewhat longer than that blink.png

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Very rough guess - count number of people listed in credits, multiply by how many years the game took to make.
A game like BF3 would likely be several hundred "man-years" of work, not that this is a very useful figure.

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Depend on your definition of "decent". Most answers here are as if you start a c++ engine from scratch ( void main() {} ) with no art and want to create BF3. You could simplify that and only donwload UDK, launch the level editor, use included assets, code nothing and still manage to get a "decent" FPS. Well it will mostly be new levels for an existing game engine, but ain't that what most commercial games do anyway?

edit : wow I took your own thread text as an answer for your topic question, time for coffee.

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Depends on many many factors

Are you making it from scratch?
What languages will you using?
How many work hours are in a day?
How much experience do you have?
How much of the art / sound / modelling will you buy / do yourself?

Theres obviously a lot more other factors to take in account, like advertisement, legal work, accounts, a web site for the project, customer support and then when you have multiplayer which has various other areas to deal with ranging from servers, concurrency, security to databases.

The list probably goes on but for now thats all I can think off, I dont even know what BF3 is so I am not sure how much of the above is relevant.

Is it doable as a single person? The way I see it, even if you dont complete your project it will still be worth it, with so many areas to learn, it is worth doing, I would rather dedicate the next 20 years of my life making an MMO on my own knowing it could fail than making 2D indie games that have a small learning curve that may bring in some ££

In the end it depends what your aim is, if its to become rich then you may want to aim a little lower, if its to learn as much as you can, building even the most complicated MMO isnt a bad idea

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Well the math is not that hard.. a typical modern FPS a-la BF3 has a development time of about 3 years... with a staff of let's say around 50 people working on it fulltime. Of course they did not start from beginner status.. so let's say they have an average 4 years experience in whatever they do (programming, art and so on) to get into the position of producing something like BF3.

So this will give you:

50 * (3 + 4) = 350 years

It's getting late so you'd better start up now :P

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Looks like ill never be able to achieve this... Moving on smile.png


The language used is likely to be a major factor in game development, making a game in C# for example will take far less time than C++ and SQL Server is far more easier to work with than say Oracle. Then if you use things like ASP.NET MVC, WCF, WPF your work will be reduced even more and thats just current features, future features of C# for example will make it even more quicker to efficiently develop and solve problems :D

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[color=#282828][font=helvetica, arial, verdana, tahoma, sans-serif]

Looks like ill never be able to achieve this... Moving on

[/font][color=#282828][font=helvetica, arial, verdana, tahoma, sans-serif]

smile.png[/quote]

[/font]

One thing to keep in mind is, today, many things are so much easier than the used to be. I can't write a AAA (or even A or B) game title myself, but that doesn't keep me from working on my game projects. It just means I need to target a different audience. You don't need mocap animation or huge high poly models. Modern versions of Wolfenstein or Doom clones are attainable as a 1-man operation, if you leverage the right resources:

Sound and Music: It used to be playing sound in the DOS days meant writing your own sound driver! Grab an OGG library and OpenAL, and in a few days you can have high quality music playing with 3d positional sound. Online you can find decent Creative Commons music tracks, and sound effects. (Or record your own sound effects.)

Graphics Rendering: If you know OpenGL you can have a wolf3d or doom-looking maze running quite quickly. You don't have to write the software rasterizer, or figure out the assembly language for optimal texturing. It's all done for you. You don't even have to have very aggressive hidden surface removal. You mostly just have to focus on the actual gameplay logic.

Graphics assets: Use sprites for the enemies like they did back then. High resolution sprites and high-res textures are easy today. Want a hi-res brick wall texture? No fooling around with PC-Paintbrush, just take your digital camera out and go up to a building. Use a digital video camera and record your friends running around and doing fight moves against a green screen. With hardware you already have and software you can get online for free, in a couple days you can have a library of sprite animations for a couple different character models. This would have taken expensive specialized hardware back then and who knows how much time. I read somewhere many of the enemies in Doom were digitized photos of clay models they built. Go get some action figures, and use stop animation, lol.

The point is, a lot of the hard problems are solved, especially if you use an already written engine. Creativity is key. If the game is fun, no one will care the whole world is made of low res cubes. Look at Minecraft!

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