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      Download the Game Design and Indie Game Marketing Freebook   07/19/17

      GameDev.net and CRC Press have teamed up to bring a free ebook of content curated from top titles published by CRC Press. The freebook, Practices of Game Design & Indie Game Marketing, includes chapters from The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, and An Architectural Approach to Level Design. The GameDev.net FreeBook is relevant to game designers, developers, and those interested in learning more about the challenges in game development. We know game development can be a tough discipline and business, so we picked several chapters from CRC Press titles that we thought would be of interest to you, the GameDev.net audience, in your journey to design, develop, and market your next game. The free ebook is available through CRC Press by clicking here. The Curated Books The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, Second Edition, by Jesse Schell Presents 100+ sets of questions, or different lenses, for viewing a game’s design, encompassing diverse fields such as psychology, architecture, music, film, software engineering, theme park design, mathematics, anthropology, and more. Written by one of the world's top game designers, this book describes the deepest and most fundamental principles of game design, demonstrating how tactics used in board, card, and athletic games also work in video games. It provides practical instruction on creating world-class games that will be played again and again. View it here. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, by Joel Dreskin Marketing is an essential but too frequently overlooked or minimized component of the release plan for indie games. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing provides you with the tools needed to build visibility and sell your indie games. With special focus on those developers with small budgets and limited staff and resources, this book is packed with tangible recommendations and techniques that you can put to use immediately. As a seasoned professional of the indie game arena, author Joel Dreskin gives you insight into practical, real-world experiences of marketing numerous successful games and also provides stories of the failures. View it here. An Architectural Approach to Level Design This is one of the first books to integrate architectural and spatial design theory with the field of level design. The book presents architectural techniques and theories for level designers to use in their own work. It connects architecture and level design in different ways that address the practical elements of how designers construct space and the experiential elements of how and why humans interact with this space. Throughout the text, readers learn skills for spatial layout, evoking emotion through gamespaces, and creating better levels through architectural theory. View it here. Learn more and download the ebook by clicking here. Did you know? GameDev.net and CRC Press also recently teamed up to bring GDNet+ Members up to a 20% discount on all CRC Press books. Learn more about this and other benefits here.
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vcjr12

Is this a Good site to learn DirectX

4 posts in this topic

SO I searched around and I found this site [url="http://rastertek.com/tutindex.html"]http://rastertek.com/tutindex.html[/url] its looks really cool since they also have Directx 10 and 9 there just in case I wanto try those out. But I'm not sure if this would be a good way to learn SlimDx at the same part. What I really want to know is what part of the tutorials will i be taking and translating into SlimDX?? Since I can't understand most of the things there with C++, I also don't wanna spent time learning the syntax which would be complicated while learning 2 other things at the same time. Please respond
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The syntax of C++ is very, very similar to C#, I'd say you have bigger problems if that's an issue. On the brighter side, SlimDX was architectured to follow the design of unmanaged D3D very closely. While there are some subtle changes and more idiomatic code, if you can understand how device state is manipulated in either API you'll at least have an idea of where to start with the other.

Most of the more interesting bits, like shader code, work fundamentally the same way in either since it's a separate language altogether. The theory and mathematics behind common techniques are also going to be the same.
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I really enjoyed those tutorials. As far as translating them goes, you would first need to research all of the small differences between unmanaged D3D and SlimDX.
This could prove to be a long and tedious task, even though the designs are incredibly similar as InvalidPointer pointed out.
If you don't understand how it works in C++, and don't have the time to learn it, the only other option would be to buy conversion software.
A quick google search gave me this link: [url="http://tangiblesoftwaresolutions.com/"]http://tangiblesoftwaresolutions.com/[/url]
But keep in mind that there is no universal solution, and you would (at least) still need to know the differences between managed and unmanaged code in order to get the translated code to work as intended.

Best of luck!
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Yes, this website has a ton of information regarding DirectX and most of the people I've met on here are polite and helpful. I usually come here for help after I've done everything I can do to solve a problem myself.

As for your C++/C# question: The biggest thing to remember is that C++ is unmanaged, meaning you can place objects in memory and access them through pointers. But this also means that [b]YOU [/b]are responsible for removing them from memory and allocating resources manually. In C# you don't have to worry about memory clean up and resources too much, the CLR does it for you... but on the down side, you don't have direct access to the memory (pointers) because the CLR is constantly moving items around in memory trying to be as efficient as possible. It determines when something should be removed from memory. So if your method's variable fell out of scope in your code doesn’t mean the CLR is going to clean it up immediately.

As long as you understand this concept you should be good to go. C# syntax is very very similar to C++.
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[quote name='DJTN' timestamp='1333726121' post='4928803']
The biggest thing to remember is that C++ is unmanaged, meaning you can place objects in memory and access them through pointers. But this also means that YOU are responsible for removing them from memory and allocating resources manually.
[/quote]

Modern C++ renders this a trivial problem with shared_ptr/intrusive_ptr and friends. Proper application of RAII principles can even render [i]them[/i] redundant. C++ is a very complex *language*; memory management is a fairly trivial problem (as proven by the garbage-collection mechanisms in C#!) and doesn't contribute as much as people claim. I blame out-of-touch academics there :|

tl;dr it's the little innocent-looking bits like side effects in function arguments (the calling order for these is unspecified, the compiler can do them basically whenever it feels like so long as it happens before the actual function call. Have fun debugging!) that will really make you want to pull your hair out. Interested parties are suggested to give [url="http://www.scapecode.com/2011/05/a-simple-c-quiz/"]Washu's C++ quizzes[/url] a gander and/or slog through the new C++11 standard.

EDIT: New! Links!

EDIT 2: And, speaking of C++11, compilers are now allowed to implement garbage collection if they so desire.
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