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Inuyashakagome16

What sections of C++ do you need to know?

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I've been coming here for years, but finally I decided I’d become active and ask a question I’ve wondered for a long time;
What's really required for game programming? But let me explain a bit more what i mean. I already know C++ on a beginner and almost intermediate level. I've had classes for, python, C#, C++, and java. So I’ve seen a few languages and of course it comes back to C++ (for me at least) when it comes to game development.
So what do i really mean? When someone who's completely new to programming asks you "What's required to make a program?" you'll tell them a main function a variable (maybe) and some sort of print line for display. So I’m asking, do i need ____ in C++ game dev? Classes, functions, poly, inheritance, etc etc. What sections/subjects in C++ would one need to make a game? More or less because i know i need to brush up on C++ and I’ve found some good sources already, but I just wanted a general direction. I didn't want to jump into making a game/ learning Direct x and get lost and just quit.

(i'm guessing this subject is best suited for the beginners section.)

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That depends on the game, and it depends a lot on your personal coding style. You can write a complete game in conformant C++ without using a single structure or class. That may not be the cleanest way to write it, but it can be done.

My personal recommendation is to not worry about pre-learning concepts in programming. Go write a bunch of programs (games even) and when you find something that seems awkward or difficult, see if there's a tool or technique that can make it easier. Generally there will be.


Honestly i don't know what kind of game i'm really going for, more or less i just want to expand my knowledge and go for creating something C++ based graphics or not.
It would probably be easier to write a game like that :P but I wouldn't dare, because it would confuse me to the point where i would have to start over.
Pretty much just program till you hit a block or some sort of issue that just seems a bit much for what you currently know then just go out and learn something new? That's pretty much what i got out of that. :P

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That's the gist of it, yeah :-)

The best way to learn is practice. If you wanted to learn to ride a bike, would you spend all your time reading books and magazines about cycling, or would you go buy a bike and roll up and down the street until you got the hang of it?

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The best way to learn is practice. If you wanted to learn to ride a bike, would you spend all your time reading books and magazines about cycling, or would you go buy a bike and roll up and down the street until you got the hang of it?


If the bike were C++... I would first get one of these:
products-sps-3.jpg
After which I would then gingerly approach said bike and very carefully attempt to peddle it. But then it would probably do this:
explosion.jpg

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That depends on the game, and it depends a lot on your personal coding style. You can write a complete game in conformant C++ without using a single structure or class. That may not be the cleanest way to write it, but it can be done.

My personal recommendation is to not worry about pre-learning concepts in programming. Go write a bunch of programs (games even) and when you find something that seems awkward or difficult, see if there's a tool or technique that can make it easier. Generally there will be.


My first graphical game: a 2D shooter written in Pascal used only goto, global variables and the borland graphics functions (everything was made by filled rectangles or lines) so it is definitly possible to write a game with little to no knowledge of the language you use or even programming in general. (As long as you are persistent), Ofcourse i only managed to make 3 levels (hardcoded as i really didn't understand file I/O) before things got unmanagable but it was a game, i made it and at the time i was insanely proud of it.

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[quote name='ApochPiQ' timestamp='1335198329' post='4934143']
That depends on the game, and it depends a lot on your personal coding style. You can write a complete game in conformant C++ without using a single structure or class. That may not be the cleanest way to write it, but it can be done.

My personal recommendation is to not worry about pre-learning concepts in programming. Go write a bunch of programs (games even) and when you find something that seems awkward or difficult, see if there's a tool or technique that can make it easier. Generally there will be.


My first graphical game: a 2D shooter written in Pascal used only goto, global variables and the borland graphics functions (everything was made by filled rectangles or lines) so it is definitly possible to write a game with little to no knowledge of the language you use or even programming in general. (As long as you are persistent), Ofcourse i only managed to make 3 levels (hardcoded as i really didn't understand file I/O) before things got unmanagable but it was a game, i made it and at the time i was insanely proud of it.
[/quote]
That's really impressive i think. I was just worried I would get to far in and I wouldn't be sure how to advance forward whether graphically or just base programming wise. But if you were able to do that with only a few things that i'm not really worried. :D

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After I've done lots of learning and periodically quitting, I've stumbled upon direct X and I was disappointed that not
even half of what I've learned was needed. What I really should have studied instead of console programming is
windows API.

But then again, lots of mistakes done and fixed, experience gained and style developed. It was "kind of" worth it.

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After I've done lots of learning and periodically quitting, I've stumbled upon direct X and I was disappointed that not
even half of what I've learned was needed. What I really should have studied instead of console programming is
windows API.

But then again, lots of mistakes done and fixed, experience gained and style developed. It was "kind of" worth it.

Is windows API really that important?

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