Sign in to follow this  

Which path should I take?

This topic is 2051 days old which is more than the 365 day threshold we allow for new replies. Please post a new topic.

If you intended to correct an error in the post then please contact us.

Recommended Posts

Please forgive me, I'm about to make the usual thread that I'm sure all you regulars hate. I'm new here by the way. First time posting, first time lurking. [img]http://public.gamedev.net//public/style_emoticons/default/biggrin.png[/img]

I'm a college student, majoring in Computer Science and minoring in Graphic Design. I just finished my first programming class, and I learned a lot. I feel solid in C++, dealing with file i/o, structures, looping, and the like. I'm not claiming to be advanced, but my foundation is great. I want to learn the art of game development, and I have years to learn and gain experience.
My problem is I feel like I'm jumping in the middle of the ocean with no floaties. I'm a Mac user, I use Xcode and I've learned how to link OpenGL and GLUT. I watched a few tutorials, created a few shapes, but I couldn't do it again without a guide. I understand HOW OpenGL works, but it's going to take some time learning the library's functions.

My question for you guys is where should I begin? Should I go back to the basics and learn another language, such as C# or Python? Should I blow the dust off my old Dell desktop, and learn DirectX? Tutorials for OpenGL on Mac are hard to find. Where did you experienced users begin, after learning the basics of your chosen language?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Nothing specific about mac I can tell you, but don't expect to remember all the functions by heart if you just started programming with OpenGL. All you really need to do is think. You know how to draw a shape by passing vertex data to OpenGL. If you know how to draw a triangle, with some thinking (and knowing about the model format) you can probably think of a way to draw them in a fashion so you get the proper model.

Furthermore it is all about practice. I don't know if you still remember your first experience with programming itself, functions, classes, even basic datatypes and loops/if statements could struck me with awe, where to use what and such, but most likely it comes natural now because you use it all the time. Same goes for everything. Design some projects for yourself. Make an .obj loader, create a small game with the obj models loaded. Just keep pushing your boundaries.

I don't think you should waste your time on learning another language, at least.. not if C++ is the thing you want to focus on anyway or if you can't find any proper references. You need to do what seems like the most fun thing to do for you. Start small, create some small projects for yourself and keep challenging yourself.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
[color=#282828][font=helvetica, arial, verdana, tahoma, sans-serif][size=3][left][background=rgb(250, 251, 252)]Tutorials for OpenGL on Mac are not hard to find, it already exists, since OpenGL is platform independent, so it doesn't need dedicated [/background][/left][/size][/font][/color][color=#282828][font=helvetica, arial, verdana, tahoma, sans-serif][size=3][left][background=rgb(250, 251, 252)]tutorials on Mac. [/background][/left][/size][/font][/color][color=#282828][font=helvetica, arial, verdana, tahoma, sans-serif][size=3][left][background=rgb(250, 251, 252)]BTW, OpenGL is easy then DirectX, for beginner, I advise you learn OpenGL first, choose C++ as the program language.[/background][/left][/size][/font][/color]

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
When you have learned C++ (quite common in game industry), stick to it to gather experiences. OpenGL is ok, it is not about learning the API, it is about getting an understanding of the concepts behind the graphical APIs (DirectX/OpenGL).

Once you have a solid understand of C++, you can adapt this knowledge to other OO-languages (i.e. C# or Java), the same can be said about OpenGL, once you understand the concepts and shaders (GLSL), you will be able to adapt this knowledge to DirectX and HLSL.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
It sounds like you're doing just fine -- if you continue as you have been you should do just fine. [img]http://public.gamedev.net//public/style_emoticons/default/smile.png[/img]


Don't worry about not remembering everything off the top of your head; you'll remember more and more over time with practice, and as long as you learn how to find out what you need to know efficiently you'll be alright.

Keep working on progressively difficult problems and challenging yourself. If you're happy with the progress you've been making there's no reason to change language just yet -- given how you've described your situation, my advice would be to pick some project that interests you and set about trying to make it; a simple game like break-out, or a basic platforming game. Learn any extra stuff you don't know along the way.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I think my problems with the tutorials on Mac were that I'm not familiar with Xcode, and I was running into a lot of errors due to attaching frameworks with my minimal understanding of the extra libraries. I always used Komodo for my editor and X11 to compile, and never really did "Projects," files only.

I'll stick with C++, and continue to practice OpenGL, thanks to you guys. I went out to Barnes and Noble yesterday and looked for a few books, but came out empty handed. They didn't have anything. The internet will be my source, I've concluded.

To keep this topic relevant, I'll rephrase:
For those that are experienced, what were your next steps in game development after learning your first language? Looking back, would you do it different? Also, what are you doing now to sharpen your skills/expand your knowledge?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This topic is 2051 days old which is more than the 365 day threshold we allow for new replies. Please post a new topic.

If you intended to correct an error in the post then please contact us.

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

Sign in to follow this