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      Download the Game Design and Indie Game Marketing Freebook   07/19/17

      GameDev.net and CRC Press have teamed up to bring a free ebook of content curated from top titles published by CRC Press. The freebook, Practices of Game Design & Indie Game Marketing, includes chapters from The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, and An Architectural Approach to Level Design. The GameDev.net FreeBook is relevant to game designers, developers, and those interested in learning more about the challenges in game development. We know game development can be a tough discipline and business, so we picked several chapters from CRC Press titles that we thought would be of interest to you, the GameDev.net audience, in your journey to design, develop, and market your next game. The free ebook is available through CRC Press by clicking here. The Curated Books The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, Second Edition, by Jesse Schell Presents 100+ sets of questions, or different lenses, for viewing a game’s design, encompassing diverse fields such as psychology, architecture, music, film, software engineering, theme park design, mathematics, anthropology, and more. Written by one of the world's top game designers, this book describes the deepest and most fundamental principles of game design, demonstrating how tactics used in board, card, and athletic games also work in video games. It provides practical instruction on creating world-class games that will be played again and again. View it here. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, by Joel Dreskin Marketing is an essential but too frequently overlooked or minimized component of the release plan for indie games. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing provides you with the tools needed to build visibility and sell your indie games. With special focus on those developers with small budgets and limited staff and resources, this book is packed with tangible recommendations and techniques that you can put to use immediately. As a seasoned professional of the indie game arena, author Joel Dreskin gives you insight into practical, real-world experiences of marketing numerous successful games and also provides stories of the failures. View it here. An Architectural Approach to Level Design This is one of the first books to integrate architectural and spatial design theory with the field of level design. The book presents architectural techniques and theories for level designers to use in their own work. It connects architecture and level design in different ways that address the practical elements of how designers construct space and the experiential elements of how and why humans interact with this space. Throughout the text, readers learn skills for spatial layout, evoking emotion through gamespaces, and creating better levels through architectural theory. View it here. Learn more and download the ebook by clicking here. Did you know? GameDev.net and CRC Press also recently teamed up to bring GDNet+ Members up to a 20% discount on all CRC Press books. Learn more about this and other benefits here.
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Servant of the Lord

Setting up a website - Questions about registaring domains

6 posts in this topic

Hey, I'm setting up several websites. I'm new to web development.
The websites will be mostly static, using WordPress.

I'm thinking of using HostGator for hosting (Any problems with them? They seem to have a good reputation). However, I was also thinking of registering more domain names than I'm currently needing (I was thinking of registering about 7 or 8 that I plan to use in the future (year or two from now), only three will I use in the present (I'm setting up a site not just for me, but another for a family member at the same time).

I was planning on registering the domains under a separate company, just incase I migrate off of HostGator in the future (i.e. keeping the registar, but switching to a new host). Is this a good idea? Am I being paranoid?

Any suggestions on where I should register domains? GoDaddy seems to have a somewhat negative reputation, despite being the largest. Have you had any problems with them? Who would you recommend?
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[quote name='Servant of the Lord' timestamp='1336325681' post='4937819']I was planning on registering the domains under a separate company, just incase I migrate off of HostGator in the future (i.e. keeping the registar, but switching to a new host). Is this a good idea? Am I being paranoid?[/quote]
The URL and the host are completely independent from each other, if you want to change the host, you simply change to which server the URL points.
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Yea, that's my point. If I register the domains with a different company than I host the sites on, they are completely separate from each other, and a host can't through shady-ish practices hold my domain hostage, since the domain is with another company. (The liklihood of switching hosts in the future is probable, the liklihood of switch a domain name register is much less so, right? I mean, either they register the domain and point it at my site or they don't. But with a host, so much more can go wrong - too much downtime, poor support, data loss, TOS changes, etc...)

Or, did you mean HostGator's domain selling business is logically separated from their webhosting business (and not just in a technical sense)?


Currently thinking, after more reading:
Host = [b]A small orange[/b]
Register = [b]1&1[/b] or [b]NameCheap[/b] Edited by Servant of the Lord
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For what it's worth, I just bought a domain with NameCheap and I've enjoyed them so far. I primarily bought it to have a dedicated domain I can use for dynamic DNS (for various home machines, each at a ***.mydomain.com domain). Since I'm not doing anything with the main domain or the www. subdomain, I made them point to my blog (which I don't use a whole lot), but I also wanted the domain so I could change this in the future if I ever made my own site.

Anyway, NameCheap was by far the cheapest (about 75$ for 5 years with WHOIS privacy protection). I haven't had any problems either, so I would certainly recommend them.

I don't like GoDaddy for two primary reasons: a) they were for SOPA/PIPA, and b) I really don't like their marketing/advertising strategy (that's more of a personal thing though). Plus they were way more expensive than NameCheap.
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Thanks for the input - in the process of registering via NameCheap. [img]http://public.gamedev.net//public/style_emoticons/default/smile.png[/img]
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I used StartLogic, they are pretty much like GoDaddy I think, but I've heard a lot of bad about the latter.

They have a WordPress plug-in and they are great for people that are complete novices at all things web (like myself).

-Jason
http://www.emblemmusic.com
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Good to know! ASmallOrange.com also has WordPress plug-ins (via cPanel). I found it surprisingly easy to get up and running.
Another cool thing ASO allows is running multiple websites from the same hosting package - but I don't know if that's common with hosts or not.
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