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DJTN

Texture Bleeding

14 posts in this topic

When moving my camera’s look at direction (up / down, left / right) the textures on the terrain and the models are bleeding together. Even if I have one model, say for example a building that has black windows and light colored walls, I can see the black windows bleeding onto the wall as the camera moves. The faster the camera moves the more intense the bleeding is.

Searching these forums I’ve found some post with similar issues but I’m not confident it’s the same problem.

I’ve changed my texture sampler’s filtering, even removing it completely and still have severe bleeding. I’ve also disabled AA and that didn’t seem to help either. What the heck is going on?


My current engine’s AA is MSAA (hardware)
And my texture filtering:
MinFilter = Linear;
MagFilter = Linear;
MipFilter = Anisotropic;


For the most part my textures are tiled but I can reproduce the issue with non-tiled mesh. Edited by DJTN
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Perhaps it's your flat screen? On LCD displays (especially the older one's) It take certain time (milliseconds) for one color to change to another especially from the extremes (black / white).

On my old display when using AutoCAD with black drawing background was a pain because all the objects had a ghosting trail when panning the screen. The effect wasn't that bad when I was using white background.

So, check your monitor specs for the response time. However, usually the response times given in the specs aren't the worst case scenarios, especially for consumer hardware. Unfortunately, there isn't much you can do about it.

[url="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Response_time_(technology)"]http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Response_time_(technology)[/url] Check here for details.

Best regards! Edited by kauna
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Yea, I agree with kauna. It's most definitely your monitor. I cannot imagine how this could be caused by DirectX (if I understood your post correctly). Moreover - to create something like that you would actually have to implement some postprocessing, something like motion blur. It won't happen by itself.

So - it will be your monitor.
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I have 2 Dell 1901FP LCD's. I've had them a while but how can I be certain they're the issue? My refresh rate is 60 Hz on both, with an option to change it to 75.
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I've attached 2 images that should explain my issue better. These were taken directly from the device's surface. Since I'm able to grab the images and they're showing the bleeding, doesn't that take my monitors out of the equation?

This image is the cam looking up at a building.
[attachment=8784:Normal.jpg]


This one is the camera looking right. Before it reaches it's destination.
[attachment=8785:CamLookRight.jpg]


You can clearly see the texture bleeding (ghosting like) issue on each side of the building.

Any ideas? Edited by DJTN
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Ok, I think this IS my monitors because I can go into photoshop and move a black square quickly over a larger white square and reproduce the ghosting issue. Guess it's time to replace these monitors. What refresh rate (or properties) should I look at when purchasing a monitor that won't ghost like this?
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Well that's some serious case of ghosting. Looks like that image is even interlaced somehow.

As for a new LCD display, you should go for LED lighted display and look especially close to the viewing angles (I'd suggest finding something with 178/178 degrees). With bigger screens bad viewing angles may affect even normal usage. IPS/H-IPS panels are pretty good.

Be very cautious for the response times, they aren't usually very good indication for the actual quality. However, for example HP ZR2440w has response time of 6ms (GtG) and IPS panel, with a reasonable price.

Best regards!
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Unless you took that second image with an actual camera or something, that definitely rules out the monitor. No need to go upgrading, its certainly not going to solve your problems.

What kind of video card(s) do you have?
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[quote name='Ravyne' timestamp='1336498783' post='4938438']
Unless you took that second image with an actual camera or something, that definitely rules out the monitor. No need to go upgrading, its certainly not going to solve your problems.

What kind of video card(s) do you have?
[/quote]

I have an NVidia GeForce 8500GT. I'm sure it's the monitors because I found a lot of gamers complaining about the same issue on the dell forums for these models.

The reason that second picture looks interlaced is because I saved some images off the surface and it didn’t show what I was seeing so I took a video of my screen and grabbed a frame from the video. I could play the video and get the same ghosting but if I paused it there was no ghosting. Again, another reason I believe it's the monitors.
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[quote name='kauna' timestamp='1336498311' post='4938434']
Well that's some serious case of ghosting. Looks like that image is even interlaced somehow.

As for a new LCD display, you should go for LED lighted display and look especially close to the viewing angles (I'd suggest finding something with 178/178 degrees). With bigger screens bad viewing angles may affect even normal usage. IPS/H-IPS panels are pretty good.

Be very cautious for the response times, they aren't usually very good indication for the actual quality. However, for example HP ZR2440w has response time of 6ms (GtG) and IPS panel, with a reasonable price.

Best regards!
[/quote]

Thanks Kauna!
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Just to be clear, you took the video with an external device, like a digital camera or camcorder, correct? If that's the case, then yes, its the monitor. If you used a screen-capture program like FRAPS or screencast, then it's not. I'm just confused by how true the scanlines are to the edge of the image, I'd have expected them to be crooked if you had used an actual camera.
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The monitor mentioned by the OP is [color=#282828][font=helvetica, arial, verdana, tahoma, sans-serif][size=3][left][background=rgb(250, 251, 252)]1901FP LCD which seems not to be even from this decade. Seems that it was brand new year 2003.[/background][/left][/size][/font][/color]

[color=#282828][font=helvetica, arial, verdana, tahoma, sans-serif][size=3][left][background=rgb(250, 251, 252)]Still, I'm confused of the interlaced kind of ghosting. I have seen such effect when viewing TV image on flat screen without deinterlacing. [/background][/left][/size][/font][/color]

Best regards!
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[quote name='kauna' timestamp='1336555309' post='4938612']

[left][color=#282828][font=helvetica, arial, verdana, tahoma, sans-serif][size=3][background=rgb(250, 251, 252)]Still, I'm confused of the interlaced kind of ghosting. I have seen such effect when viewing TV image on flat screen without deinterlacing. [/background][/size][/font][/color][/left]

[/quote]
Maybe the interlacement is caused just by the recording of the video?
I really wonder (as Ravyne) whether he recorded the monitor externally (using a camera) or captured the screen using some SW.
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The image that has the interlacing represents what I was seeing but [b]is not the actual issue[/b]. It's as close as to what I could get to demonstrate what I was seeing. Since I was unable to record a still frame, I knew it was my monitors at that point causing the ghosting effect. The image was taken from a video that was recorded with desktop recording software. When I played it I got the same ghosting effect but when I tried to grab a still frame the effect was gone. The closest thing I could get to show the issue was the video paused between frames, mimicking the ghosting issue.

@Kauna- Yes, I know my monitors have some age on them but I haven't had a need to replace them till now ;)

Thanks for the replies...
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Yea, then it is 100 % clear, it is the monitor.
You would be able to record the issue, but only with a camera. But that's not necessary at all, we already know the source of the problem.
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