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Character Eyes Vision in DirectX

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I am trying to make the character see their enemies, so I thought about creating multiple boundary boxes and when the enemy collide with any of the vision boundary box it means they see their enemy, the problem I am having is that in 3D world everything can intersect anything unless physics programming is involved, I want this boundary box NOT to intersect with other buildings, like for example, if the character is inside a building, he cant see other people through the wall.

I would like to hear suggestion on how to make the character vision boundary boxes cant intersect with walls and other meshes.

Maybe there is another way to create character vision.

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Most games do it using ray-tracing techniques. They'll cast some rays starting from the character's eyes towards some object of interest, and see what the closest intersection is. If the closest intersection is the object of interest, then it's visible. If not, it's not visible.

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Ray tracing is a complex subject, and it's not something I can just explain to you in a forum post. There are tons of resources around if you want to learn how to implement it yourself, but it isn't trivial...at least if you want it to be fast. Most physics packages can handle ray casting, and there's also some libraries (like [url="http://software.intel.com/en-us/articles/embree-photo-realistic-ray-tracing-kernels/"]this one[/url]) that are dedicated to ray tracing.

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Calculating if a [url="http://www.gamedev.net/topic/456667-ray-box-intersection/"]ray intersects a bounding box[/url] is fairly simple and quick.

If you want accurate per polygon testing you can use http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/windows/desktop/bb172882%28v=vs.85%29.aspx after you've determined that the ray intersects the bounding box of the object.

That should be fast enough for a simple game with a fairly small number of objects to be tested. For more complicated games you really want to use a physics library to do it for you because it will be much quicker.

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[u]Robust and fast[/u] visibility testing is quite hard to implement. It's probably a good idea to not reinvent the wheel and use an existing software package, like Bullet or PhysX. Think twice before using Embree, as it's all triangle soup in there (no notion of transformation hierarchy)

Load your scene into Bullet or PhysX, and trace eye rays to enemies.

[quote][color=#282828][font=helvetica, arial, verdana, tahoma, sans-serif][size=3][left][background=rgb(250, 251, 252)]boundary boxes[/quote][/background][/left][/size][/font][/color]
[left][background=rgb(250, 251, 252)][font="helvetica, arial, verdana, tahoma, sans-serif"][size="2"][color="#282828"]I assume you want support for partial visibility? An easy way to do this is to define an acceptable 'partial visibility' granularity, and trace multiple rays per enemy.[/color][/size][/font][/background][/left]

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Lets say I have skinned mesh and I want to make a ray coming from the character eyes, when he move his head (the ray position should change as well), is it possible to use D3DXIntersect() to accomplish that? (be aware that SOME boundary boxes could means that the character doesn't see his enemy for example a wall or door. Edited by Medo3337

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In theory, sure. In practice, you're going to want a much smarter system in place so you don't have to test every single enemy/character against every other-- that's going to scale very, very poorly. I'm not even getting into good stuff like world geometry! Like has been suggested before, go with Bullet, PhysX or Havok. As far as I'm aware most commercial projects do just this with a handful of special cases/optimizations where a generic approach isn't suitable for the problem in question.

BTW, you seem to think that Direct3D is the only tool for the job (?) when it's really just suitable for drawing polygons, etc. to the screen. Just because the feature involves 'visual' stuff doesn't mean you need to use a graphics library! As far as the user is concerned, a handful of rays is more than adequate and more accurate systems may end up doing more harm than good for the final gameplay experience.

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This topic is 2039 days old which is more than the 365 day threshold we allow for new replies. Please post a new topic.

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