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First post: I finished reading a XNA book and made a simple STG, whats next?

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Hi, everyone.
I read the beginner guide two weeks ago, and picked up the book[size=2]

Microsoft XNA Game Studio 4.0: Learn Programming Now!
Now I finished the book and made a simple shooter game. Now I am thinking if I should make more games (in different types) with XNA, or read some books about DirectX and go 3D?
Thanks.

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I don't think there is a simple answer to this. How are your C++ skills? (not plain C but proper object oriented programming) That would be a big issue in learning Directx.

A local uni does do XNA 2d in semester 1 and Directx 2d in semester 2, but I know several people who advocate 3d in XNA first. Just getting Directx to run in Visual Studio is quite a trial at first, with heaps of libraries to link etc. Being at a similar stage to you, I am continuing the XNA route while trying out Directx and Opengl on the side.

Hopefully a more experienced member can answer better.

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I don't think there is a simple answer to this. How are your C++ skills? (not plain C but proper object oriented programming) That would be a big issue in learning Directx.

A local uni does do XNA 2d in semester 1 and Directx 2d in semester 2, but I know several people who advocate 3d in XNA first. Just getting Directx to run in Visual Studio is quite a trial at first, with heaps of libraries to link etc. Being at a similar stage to you, I am continuing the XNA route while trying out Directx and Opengl on the side.

Hopefully a more experienced member can answer better.


Thanks for your reply. My C++ knowledge is very basic, but I have a game c++ book which I just read the first two chapters.
My current plan is to make some mini games, like hangman/rockscissorpaper using XNA for windows 8 market, see if I can make some money. ^__^

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@The Op:

My advice, focus on the skills that you have begun to develop under XNA. I am not advocating XNA in anyway but you have a base now – use that traction to your advantage. Beware of the trap of attempting to learn a variety of different languages and API's so early in the game. As true for a majority of us here, you want to make games right? So begin to hone your "game programming" skills in the areas of gameplay – or risk ending up with a half-a$$ed portfolio of tech demos.

The questions you should be asking yourself:

  1. How well do I know any language and API to implement the necessary components for the game I want to create? i.e., AI, Scoring Systems, Battle Systems, Menus, Level Editors, etc.
  2. Can I implement my own game play ideas with my current skills? i.e., Language, Graphics API

--
Considering that you know a little of XNA right now and some C#, could you sit down and program a Tetris clone? Pac Man? Space Invaders? Honestly, I am not suggesting that you do any of those, I am only posing a question to make you think - "How much about game programming do your really know?"

Futhermore, have you truly experienced what it is to “think” your way through tough logical coding sessions utilizing your programming and API knowledge? The games mentioned above provide an adequate challange, removing the hassle of design, so your plan of attack would be pretty much straightforward - maybe wink.png ... The exersise if you choose to pursue would provide a decent litmest test of your skills.

Anyway, it is early, and I am starting to rant. For it's worth, I am only offering advice [being helpful].

It bears repeating, beware of the proverbial hamster wheel (trying to learn a plethora of “x” languages and “x” APIs but never truly developing any game play programming skills). Before you know it, you may end up with what I mentioned above, a bunch of tech demos and or the equivalent of interactive screensavers [3D environments with no action] blink.png ... if you even make it that far - most usually do not.

Good luck but most of all have fun. Edited by a_insomniac

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@The Op:

My advice, focus on the skills that you have begun to develop under XNA. I am not advocating XNA in anyway but you have a base now – use that traction to your advantage. Beware of the trap of attempting to learn a variety of different languages and API's so early in the game. As true for a majority of us here, you want to make games right? So begin to hone your "game programming" skills in the areas of gameplay – or risk ending up with a half-a$$ed portfolio of tech demos.

The questions you should be asking yourself:

  1. How well do I know any language and API to implement the necessary components for the game I want to create? i.e., AI, Scoring Systems, Battle Systems, Menus, Level Editors, etc.
  2. Can I implement my own game play ideas with my current skills? i.e., Language, Graphics API

--
Considering that you know a little of XNA right now and some C#, could you sit down and program a Tetris clone? Pac Man? Space Invaders? Honestly, I am not suggesting that you do any of those, I am only posing a question to make you think - "How much about game programming do your really know?"

Futhermore, have you truly experienced what it is to “think” your way through tough logical coding sessions utilizing your programming and API knowledge? The games mentioned above provide an adequate challange, removing the hassle of design, so your plan of attack would be pretty much straightforward - maybe wink.png ... The exersise if you choose to pursue would provide a decent litmest test of your skills.

Anyway, it is early, and I am starting to rant. For it's worth, I am only offering advice [being helpful].

It bears repeating, beware of the proverbial hamster wheel (trying to learn a plethora of “x” languages and “x” APIs but never truly developing any game play programming skills). Before you know it, you may end up with what I mentioned above, a bunch of tech demos and or the equivalent of interactive screensavers [3D environments with no action] blink.png ... if you even make it that far - most usually do not.

Good luck but most of all have fun.


Thank you for the advice. I will make some mini games with XNA for a while, as windows 8 is coming out soon.

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