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Shyft

TTRPG Design Project: Thermal Shock

4 posts in this topic

Hi everybody!

I am a game designer, trained and experienced but never employed. To that end I decided I'm going to use all that and actually [i]Make [/i]a Goddamn Game. So here's what I'm gonna do. [url="http://thermalshockgame.blogspot.com/"]I'm going make a blog, and I'm going to post all the progress I make, along with the core rules and so on.[/url]

So where do you all come in? Easy, you're exposure, you're word-of mouth advertising (even though I'm not going to charge anything.) When I have functioning rules, you're all welcome to test the out!

Now, the actual Game:

[size=6]Working Title: Thermal Shock[/size]

[size=5]What is Thermal Shock?[/size]

Thermal Shock, or TS for short, is a prototype TTRPG ruleset, primarily created as a means to hone my own game design skills, and to spread awareness of my skills. I also hope to make sure people have fun!

The name is currently a working title, but for now, TS will do.

[size=5]What do you do in Thermal Shock?[/size]

In this game, you and your friends play as pilots of advanced combat vehicles, a giant robot or some similar form of mecha. You and your fellow players serve as a small squad of trained, experienced badasses. Are you Soldiers? Mercenaries or Pirates? Private Security? No matter what you are, you ride in some of the baddest pieces of military hardware around.

[size=5]Project Goals:[/size][list]
[*]Create a fast, easy to resolve combat rules for cinematic battles
[*]Allow for extensive customization of player characters and their iconic battle machines
[*]Develop enough of a compelling world to give players a reason to play Thermal Shock.
[/list]
Follow along on the blog, here in this thread, PM me, whatever works! I'd love to hear any thoughts on the project. I can't accept a lot of suggestions, too many cooks spoil the broth and all that, but I'll do my best!
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It would be nice if we were treated more as advice givers/mentors rather than your advertising campaign slaves. Can you please provide a resume or other evidence of your past experience?

Also, there is little incentive for us to comment considering that you aren't interested in taking suggestions. You can always pick and choose as you see fit, but you should be as flexible as possible if you want to design a truly successful game. Edited by w00tf0rfr00t
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That's part of my problem, I have no experience other than various homebrew projects, nothing I consider worth mentioning. This is [i]it. [/i]

That being said, I apologize if I gave the wrong impression.

I'm not going to lie, I AM posting this to get exposure, but I want exposure so people will tell me if they see things wrong. It was more that I'm a little fearful of people wanting to get involved and then bog the project down, I've had it happen to other things I've worked on and seen it happen elsewhere.

It's like, I'll welcome suggestions for things like "This is broken, here's why.". I was aiming to prevent suggestions like 'you should add this kind of thing!'

I'll be glad to edit my post and blog to better reflect my intent, though I'm not entirely sure how to phrase it.

[quote name='w00tf0rfr00t' timestamp='1338770669' post='4945974']
It would be nice if we were treated more as advice givers/mentors rather than your advertising campaign slaves. Can you please provide a resume or other evidence of your past experience?

Also, there is little incentive for us to comment considering that you aren't interested in taking suggestions. You can always pick and choose as you see fit, but you should be as flexible as possible if you want to design a truly successful game.
[/quote]
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[quote name='Shyft' timestamp='1338764887' post='4945947']
[left][background=rgb(250, 251, 252)]I'd love to hear any thoughts on the project. [/background][/left]
I can't accept a lot of suggestions, too many cooks spoil the broth and all that...[/quote]

It does come off as a bit contradictory. I believe I understand what you're trying to say is:
"I want your feedback, but I certainly can't promise that they'll be implemented in my game."

So to the meat of this... here's what I got out of your post:

[b]What is your purpose for making Thermal Shock?[/b]
1. make a complete game to get experience, and have something to show companies when you apply
2. prove to yourself that you can do it

[b]Why tell us about it?[/b]
1. get valuable feedback, opinions, and advice
2. request our participation in development ([i]in which case this should be in help wanted[/i])
2. exposure ([i]I'm not sure how this applies here... you might get a couple dozen curious gamedev forum-goers to swing by the website, but this isn't exactly the prime location to recruit players[/i])

[b]My $0.02 (what you should do)[/b][list]
[*][b]Definitely[/b] start your developer journal / blog. That's a fantastic way to increase exposure and also prove to employers you've experienced the start-to-finish process. Learn the ways of the blogosphere and rope in other interested game bloggers once the thing is playable.
[*]Lurk around these forums, asking for [b]specific[/b] design or technical questions about your project. Too many cooks may spoil the broth, but in game development, that broth is going to take years to finish simmering if it's just you by your lonesome. Besides, cooks can only spoil the broth if all the cooks have absolute say in the outcome. My advice: take all the advice you can get, and select the bits that you like. Who knows, maybe a great suggestion will save you time and effort?
[*]If/When the time comes that you need more developers to build the thing, post it in the help wanted section.
[/list]
Good luck, I hope you succeed with your project, show employers that you can do this stuff, and land a job somewhere you love.
Cheers!

edit: You've got a very solid, well-worded, thorough progress blog. Looks like you put a lot of work into those mechanics. Edited by Humble Hobo
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[quote name='Shyft' timestamp='1338764887' post='4945947']
is a prototype TTRPG ruleset
[/quote]
TT=Table Top ? Like MechWarrior table top ? What is your goal, get a job in the pen'n'paper/table top game world or in the computer game world ?

[quote name='Shyft' timestamp='1338764887' post='4945947']
Create a fast, easy to resolve combat rules for cinematic battles
[/quote]
My two cents:
To be honest, I don't believe that you gain much awareness when writing down a ruleset for an table top game. Without visuals or easy way to test out your game ideas, you will most likely not gain much attention at all. When you want attention you need to ofter something you can consume with your eyes, i.e. a playable computer game, a video , screenshots, but no GDD (=passion killer).
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