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glhf

Sneaking and night?

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I would like to hear all options we have for sneaking and if it's possible to keep night cycles in your game without light hacks being made.

Starting with night.. Pitch black darkness except for any light sources that give a small or big radius around it for light.
Is it possible to make it so the game only renders what is inside the lighted area? So even if they turn on a light hack nothing outside the supposed to be lighted area is rendered?
Any other solutions?


Now for sneaking..
In a game like world of warcraft.. is it possible to create a cheat that detects if there are any players behind you even if your camera can't see them? Because I don't think it's camera that choses what to be rendered but instead a radius around the character?
Would rendering just what the camera sees be an options? Or would that be too costly on performance or cause some kind of lag?

And I know that people can cheat to see through objects because the game has rendered the character behind the wall you just can't see him.. but with a cheat you can highlight him behind a wall.

I know you can do rays to determine what should not be rendered but that is very high performance cost?

The only real option for sneaking that I see atm is making a skill to become invisible.. but that isn't really sneaking imo...

Should we just forget about adding sneaking to a game?

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To avoid the client cheating in these cases, you need a trusted server to make the decision as to which objects are visible to each player.

Most visibility hacks work because the server sends you data for all nearby objects, and then the client performs further frustum/occlusion culling to find the visible objects. Instead, you need all visibility detection to be done on the server.

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To avoid the client cheating in these cases, you need a trusted server to make the decision as to which objects are visible to each player.

Most visibility hacks work because the server sends you data for all nearby objects, and then the client performs further frustum/occlusion culling to find the visible objects. Instead, you need all visibility detection to be done on the server.


Can you explain a bit more please?
What kind of visibility detection do you suggest to do on server side that isn't too costly on performance?
You make it sound very easy... and maybe it is.. but I don't understand why this kind of cheating is so rampant in that case and why they don't prevent it the way you say.

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I think you always need to send a little bit too much to the client to avoid visible artifacts, e.g. you turn quickly and players suddenly pop into and out of visibility when the server catches up.

Having said that, you could achieve a pretty good server-side culling by only sending updates for players within a 180 degree angle (90 degrees either side of the direction they're facing), and by using PVS to cull a good proportion of players behind walls. I wonder whether you could achieve a higher level of cheat protection by billboarding distant players (e.g. <20 pixels tall). It would make precise aiming e.g. headshots harder. The server could also send decoy billboards, e.g. inanimate objects. Sound sources could be obscured by providing multiple sound sources that add up to the desired sound.

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