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Narf the Mouse

Virus in QtCreator C++ IDE for Windows?

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BitDefender thinks so.

I got the file here: http[de-url]://qt.nokia.com/downloads - Hopefully, it doesn't turn that into a link.

Comments?

Edit: Text inserted to try to make sure it doesn't turn into a link. Edited by Narf the Mouse

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The odds are very slim. This is well respected software. I know the main Qt install has to patch qmake.exe which often upsets virus scanners. Maybe Creator does something similar.

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It also wanted to install some sort of driver software - One reason I posted the url was to be sure I'd gotten the right page.

I'll give it a shot tomorrow.

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[quote name='Narf the Mouse' timestamp='1339239441' post='4947626']<br />It also wanted to install some sort of driver software<br />[/quote]

Hmm. I recently "installed" Creator on my PC by just copying the installation folder from my laptop and running the executable, no problems at all, so I'm sure this must be false positive from your virus checker, and a fairly odd false positive at that.

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[quote name='Aardvajk' timestamp='1339324288' post='4947871']
[quote name='Narf the Mouse' timestamp='1339239441' post='4947626']<br />It also wanted to install some sort of driver software<br />[/quote]

Hmm. I recently "installed" Creator on my PC by just copying the installation folder from my laptop and running the executable, no problems at all, so I'm sure this must be false positive from your virus checker, and a fairly odd false positive at that.
[/quote]
Well, based on subsequent scans, it might have been something else and just a coincidence. OTOH, it's not impossible for a virus to get into a download. I'm redownloading it to run a scan on it.

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BitDefender persists in its belief; it stops the install part-way through. "UpdateInfo" is not installed, if I'm reading the message QtCreator gives me when I start it, right.

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[quote name='Narf the Mouse' timestamp='1339344147' post='4947944']
BitDefender persists in its belief; it stops the install part-way through. "UpdateInfo" is not installed, if I'm reading the message QtCreator gives me when I start it, right.
[/quote]

Hmm. UpdateInfo is a plugin. From looking at is source on the web, I can only assume it checks for updates to either Creator or the Qt SDK. Maybe the fact it tries to connect to an external site is what is causing BitDefender to dislike it.

Guess you either investigate further via the Nokia site or turn off BitDefender. You could also try manually putting UpdateInfo.dll and UpdateInfo.pluginspec in the lib\qtcreator\plugins\Nokia directory if you can get hold of them on their own.

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I've more and more gotten to a point where I start to believe that antivirus software (especially "live protection") is snake oil at best, and malware at worst.

I've recently upgraded my Russian "security software" from the 2010 to the 2012 version (once again worse than its predecessor, sigh). It shows an entire dozen warnings when Firefox starts up. Sometimes it comes up with warnings that are pretty much the quality of "Program X tries to make the computer explode. Accept? Decline? Accept forever?" on programs that have provably not done anything malicious for years. It's sometimes not quite clear what to make of the warning, either -- "Program X wants to access a system service. Allow?" Great. "A system service". What are you expected to make of that?

At the same time, it treats Windows Explorer and svchost.exe (which could [i]really [/i]run just about every arbitrary piece of malicious code) as trusted applications with unrestricted access. LibreOffice and Notepad run as "moderately restricted", but Adobe Flash is "trusted". I wonder which of the two was the source of more exploits during the last decade.

If only I could find a working, unobtrusive on-demand scanner for single files and a working, unobtrusive application-level firewall, that would really be all I'd need...

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[quote name='samoth' timestamp='1339423926' post='4948163']
I've more and more gotten to a point where I start to believe that antivirus software (especially "live protection") is snake oil at best, and malware at worst.

I've recently upgraded my Russian "security software" from the 2010 to the 2012 version (once again worse than its predecessor, sigh). It shows an entire dozen warnings when Firefox starts up. Sometimes it comes up with warnings that are pretty much the quality of "Program X tries to make the computer explode. Accept? Decline? Accept forever?" on programs that have provably not done anything malicious for years. It's sometimes not quite clear what to make of the warning, either -- "Program X wants to access a system service. Allow?" Great. "A system service". What are you expected to make of that?

At the same time, it treats Windows Explorer and svchost.exe (which could [i]really [/i]run just about every arbitrary piece of malicious code) as trusted applications with unrestricted access. LibreOffice and Notepad run as "moderately restricted", but Adobe Flash is "trusted". I wonder which of the two was the source of more exploits during the last decade.

If only I could find a working, unobtrusive on-demand scanner for single files and a working, unobtrusive application-level firewall, that would really be all I'd need...
[/quote]
Well, this is the first thing BitDefender has gotten a false positive on; I've had it for several months. Most of the time, I don't even notice it.

Are you sure you're not just using junk virus-scanners? Which reviews did you look at?

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False positives are really common. Kerbal space program comes up as a virus under norton. But then norton is pretty much a virus in its own right.

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[quote name='Narf the Mouse']Are you sure you're not just using junk virus-scanners?.[/quote]The line of scanners I've used is admittedly not terrifyingly long, but any scanner that I've ever tried/used was either obnoxious or never found a virus (which might mean I've never had one in ~20 years, or it might mean my scanners just never detected one) or produced a lot of false positives, or... the combination of the three.
Among the scanners that I remember trying/using were Norton, F-Prot (which was actually kind of ok back in the 1990s from a usability+weight perspective), Avira, Avast, AVG, Malware Bytes, Kaspersky, and Microsoft.
Oh, and that GPL scanner... ClamAV. I used to run that one on my transparent HTTP proxy and on the POP3 proxy a decade or so ago. It also never found one thing. But then maybe I really never encountered a virus, who knows... in that case of course it would be normal that the scanner didn't find anything.

[quote name='6677' timestamp='1339693396' post='4949200']But then norton is pretty much a virus in its own right.[/quote]Heh, Norton can make the most powerful computer you could possibly afford entirely unusable. [img]http://public.gamedev.net//public/style_emoticons/default/biggrin.png[/img]

But then again Kaspersky (which I'm [i]still [/i]using for some obscure reason, actually can you tell me why?) isn't much better. It used to be almost ok 5-6 years ago, but it has gotten more bloated and slower and more obnoxious with every update. What does an antivirus program need upwards of 200 MB of disk space for anyway? Edited by samoth

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[quote name='samoth' timestamp='1339696559' post='4949217']
But then again Kaspersky (which I'm [i]still [/i]using for some obscure reason, actually can you tell me why?) isn't much better. It used to be almost ok 5-6 years ago, but it has gotten more bloated and slower and more obnoxious with every update. What does an antivirus program need upwards of 200 MB of disk space for anyway?
[/quote]

By using more HD space there will be less space left that a virus can occupy :D
(I'd guess most of it is used for storing virus signatures)

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