• Announcements

    • khawk

      Download the Game Design and Indie Game Marketing Freebook   07/19/17

      GameDev.net and CRC Press have teamed up to bring a free ebook of content curated from top titles published by CRC Press. The freebook, Practices of Game Design & Indie Game Marketing, includes chapters from The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, and An Architectural Approach to Level Design. The GameDev.net FreeBook is relevant to game designers, developers, and those interested in learning more about the challenges in game development. We know game development can be a tough discipline and business, so we picked several chapters from CRC Press titles that we thought would be of interest to you, the GameDev.net audience, in your journey to design, develop, and market your next game. The free ebook is available through CRC Press by clicking here. The Curated Books The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, Second Edition, by Jesse Schell Presents 100+ sets of questions, or different lenses, for viewing a game’s design, encompassing diverse fields such as psychology, architecture, music, film, software engineering, theme park design, mathematics, anthropology, and more. Written by one of the world's top game designers, this book describes the deepest and most fundamental principles of game design, demonstrating how tactics used in board, card, and athletic games also work in video games. It provides practical instruction on creating world-class games that will be played again and again. View it here. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, by Joel Dreskin Marketing is an essential but too frequently overlooked or minimized component of the release plan for indie games. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing provides you with the tools needed to build visibility and sell your indie games. With special focus on those developers with small budgets and limited staff and resources, this book is packed with tangible recommendations and techniques that you can put to use immediately. As a seasoned professional of the indie game arena, author Joel Dreskin gives you insight into practical, real-world experiences of marketing numerous successful games and also provides stories of the failures. View it here. An Architectural Approach to Level Design This is one of the first books to integrate architectural and spatial design theory with the field of level design. The book presents architectural techniques and theories for level designers to use in their own work. It connects architecture and level design in different ways that address the practical elements of how designers construct space and the experiential elements of how and why humans interact with this space. Throughout the text, readers learn skills for spatial layout, evoking emotion through gamespaces, and creating better levels through architectural theory. View it here. Learn more and download the ebook by clicking here. Did you know? GameDev.net and CRC Press also recently teamed up to bring GDNet+ Members up to a 20% discount on all CRC Press books. Learn more about this and other benefits here.
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0
Chris941

UDK or Unity? The best game engine for beginners?

61 posts in this topic

[quote name='Chris941' timestamp='1339970861' post='4950098']
[quote name='SimonForsman' timestamp='1339950305' post='4950043']
Allthough strictly speaking scripting is also programming, so pretty much all games made with Unity, UDK, etc involve quite a bit of programming. (Not as much as if you write everything from scratch ofcourse but still quite alot (Especially for larger games as the engine only really handles the basics for you)).

a better question might be: How many AAA games are made without the use of [b]any middleware[/b](I'd be surprised if you need more than one hand to count those), If you want to make a good game you'll benefit greatly by taking advantage of the tools that are available to you, rejecting a tool because it is easy to use is fairly silly (The easier a tool is to use the better), Just look at the number of AAA games using ScaleForm for example.

The only questions you should ask are:
1) Does the tools support my target platform(s) ? (With Unity the major non supported platforms would be Linux, Blackberry, Symbian and Windows Phone, none of which is all that important)
2) Are there any unacceptable limitations ? (Unity free has a bunch which may be an issue, the pro version is pretty darn flexible)
3) Does the timesavings/productivity gains justify the licensing cost ? (You shouldn't buy Unity pro if you're only going to make a wordfeud clone)
[/quote]

Thanks for commenting Simon! What exactly is middleware?

Anyway the game what I planned on doing is makin a few games for launch with my game studio for windows, then when i raise the 1,500 I'll go on to the Pro feature! I have no plan on making a clone, and especially of wordfeud! All original ideas! I may not know how I get these original ideas in game form, but they're original! Haha.

So 1) yes, going for windows then platforms
2) for the time, no because I have no idea what tey really are for the game, but later, yes

3) yes, no plans on making clones of games, they don't sell we'll I can tell! Especially when it's a rip of a popular game like angry birds, fruit ninja, or even....wordfeud!
[/quote]

Middleware = libraries/engines written by someoneelse that you license in order to cut development costs, Common examples in AAA games would be things like SpeedTree, Havok, Scaleform, Bink video aswell as most game engines.

For Unity free the main limitations really are:
1) Your company can't have a annual turnover above $100.000
2) a bunch of rendering features are missing (and in the free version you don't get the access you need to fix it).
3) Nice, we don't need another zynga [img]http://public.gamedev.net//public/style_emoticons/default/smile.png[/img], allthough i really just used a wordfeud clone as an example due to the games simplicity (Unity doesn't save all that much time for that type of game)
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
@SimonForsman, thanks for the answer! i've uploaded a comment via iphone but i guess it never really posted! Anyway, i'm starting to learn the basics and details of Unity, now i need to learn how to program O_o....
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
[quote name='Chris941' timestamp='1339983580' post='4950117']
but the biggest mind boggle that no one is telling me the answer for is How to create stuff or it! For example, menus, customization, and so much more!
[/quote]
Have you started to try working through the tutorials and resources you've been linked to, such as the detailed [url="http://unity3d.com/support/documentation/Manual/index.html"]user manual[/url]? Most of these things are covered somewhere in the documentation; people aren't providing a more detailed explanation of these things because they would just be repeating material that already exists.

To take your own example of menus, you would work through the provided material on "[url="http://unity3d.com/support/documentation/Manual/Game%20Interface%20Elements.html"]game interface elements[/url]" (this is a section from the above linked user manual). You'll probably find that too hard to follow if you try to jump straight into it, but if you work through the basic introductory materials first you should then be able to work through these guides to figure out anything you need -- or if you do still get stuck, you'll have more specific questions or problems we can help you with rather than wanting us to essentially repeat the entire manual. [img]http://public.gamedev.net//public/style_emoticons/default/wink.png[/img] [img]http://public.gamedev.net//public/style_emoticons/default/cool.png[/img]


"[url="http://unity3d.com/support/documentation/Manual/Unity%20Basics.html"]Unity Basics[/url]" is a good landing page to get you off and running.
The recommended starting point is with the [url="http://download.unity3d.com/support/documentation/Images/manual/GUIEssentials.pdf"]GUI essentials tutorial[/url] (pdf) or [url="http://unity3d.com/support/documentation/Manual/Learning%20the%20Interface.html"]Learning The Interface[/url], both of which will walk you through the layout and explain some of the different functionality the editor provides. I'd highly recommend the GUI essentials tutorial -- you can even print it off if you want to go through it without switching back and forth to a browser window. They also provide a set of [url="http://unity3d.com/support/documentation/video/"]video tutorials[/url] covering this material.
The might then continue with the "Unity Basics" and learn about "[url="http://unity3d.com/support/documentation/Manual/Asset%20Workflow.html"]Asset Workflow[/url]" (how to add graphics and stuff to your game), or if you wanted to learn a bit more about scripting you could work through the [url="http://download.unity3d.com/support/documentation/Images/manual/ScriptingTutorial.pdf"]Introduction to Scripting with Unity[/url] (pdf).


Once you've worked through the basics, look for other tutorials or examples that match up with whatever you want to learn. You might work through the "[url="http://unity3d.com/support/documentation/Manual/Creating%20Gameplay.html"]Creating Gameplay[/url]" section of the manual (I'd recommend at least reading through it), or have a go at building a menu using the "game interface elements" section I linked to above, or you might work through this [url="http://unity3d.com/support/resources/tutorials/2d-gameplay-tutorial"]2d gameplay[/url] tutorial. From there most of your basic questions should already be answered, and we'll be happy to help you (don't forget you can also try the Unity community for additional/alternative help!) with any more specific problems you're having.


Really, if you haven't done so yet, just [i]start working through the basics tutorials[/i].

Good luck! [img]http://public.gamedev.net//public/style_emoticons/default/smile.png[/img]
1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
[quote name='jbadams' timestamp='1340088021' post='4950501']
[quote name='Chris941' timestamp='1339983580' post='4950117']
but the biggest mind boggle that no one is telling me the answer for is How to create stuff or it! For example, menus, customization, and so much more!
[/quote]
Have you started to try working through the tutorials and resources you've been linked to, such as the detailed [url="http://unity3d.com/support/documentation/Manual/index.html"]user manual[/url]? Most of these things are covered somewhere in the documentation; people aren't providing a more detailed explanation of these things because they would just be repeating material that already exists.

To take your own example of menus, you would work through the provided material on "[url="http://unity3d.com/support/documentation/Manual/Game%20Interface%20Elements.html"]game interface elements[/url]" (this is a section from the above linked user manual). You'll probably find that too hard to follow if you try to jump straight into it, but if you work through the basic introductory materials first you should then be able to work through these guides to figure out anything you need -- or if you do still get stuck, you'll have more specific questions or problems we can help you with rather than wanting us to essentially repeat the entire manual. [img]http://public.gamedev.net//public/style_emoticons/default/wink.png[/img] [img]http://public.gamedev.net//public/style_emoticons/default/cool.png[/img]


"[url="http://unity3d.com/support/documentation/Manual/Unity%20Basics.html"]Unity Basics[/url]" is a good landing page to get you off and running.
The recommended starting point is with the [url="http://download.unity3d.com/support/documentation/Images/manual/GUIEssentials.pdf"]GUI essentials tutorial[/url] (pdf) or [url="http://unity3d.com/support/documentation/Manual/Learning%20the%20Interface.html"]Learning The Interface[/url], both of which will walk you through the layout and explain some of the different functionality the editor provides. I'd highly recommend the GUI essentials tutorial -- you can even print it off if you want to go through it without switching back and forth to a browser window. They also provide a set of [url="http://unity3d.com/support/documentation/video/"]video tutorials[/url] covering this material.
The might then continue with the "Unity Basics" and learn about "[url="http://unity3d.com/support/documentation/Manual/Asset%20Workflow.html"]Asset Workflow[/url]" (how to add graphics and stuff to your game), or if you wanted to learn a bit more about scripting you could work through the [url="http://download.unity3d.com/support/documentation/Images/manual/ScriptingTutorial.pdf"]Introduction to Scripting with Unity[/url] (pdf).


Once you've worked through the basics, look for other tutorials or examples that match up with whatever you want to learn. You might work through the "[url="http://unity3d.com/support/documentation/Manual/Creating%20Gameplay.html"]Creating Gameplay[/url]" section of the manual (I'd recommend at least reading through it), or have a go at building a menu using the "game interface elements" section I linked to above, or you might work through this [url="http://unity3d.com/support/resources/tutorials/2d-gameplay-tutorial"]2d gameplay[/url] tutorial. From there most of your basic questions should already be answered, and we'll be happy to help you (don't forget you can also try the Unity community for additional/alternative help!) with any more specific problems you're having.


Really, if you haven't done so yet, just [i]start working through the basics tutorials[/i].

Good luck! [img]http://public.gamedev.net//public/style_emoticons/default/smile.png[/img]
[/quote]

Thank you for the long, linked reply back :) I will read through the manual and provided links a few times, and with any specific questions I will take to here!
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Should I be using a different program to go along with Unity? Many people and the manual is giving an example to use Maya.... Or is there a better one?
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Use whatever modeller you find best for you. Unity supports maya models more than any other format I think but I don't think it really matters.
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
[quote name='6677' timestamp='1340119831' post='4950608']
Use whatever modeller you find best for you. Unity supports maya models more than any other format I think but I don't think it really matters.
[/quote]

Unity primarily uses FBX which is an interchange format, pretty much all modern modelling tools will export to it without any issues.

Maya is fairly expensive so it is probably a good idea to go with something else, (Blender is free and there are alot of tutorials both for it and for using it with Unity)
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Judging by the way you phrased that last question, I'm assuming you aren't fully aware of what Maya is, so I'll go into a bit of detail about it:

Maya is a 3D modeling program. In other words, it's used to make models and animate them so you can import them into your game and put them into the game world.

Blender is another 3D modeling program. It's free to install the full version. I use it and I think it has a genius design, though I'm not very talented with 3D modeling.

Now, with 3D modeling programs, you can make crates and characters and creatures...whatever you might need in your game, with enough skill, you can make it with 3D modeling. However, you should remember that 3D modeling is it's own thing, an entirely new practice compared to programming/scripting. It takes artistic skill and lots of practice before you'll start making the amazing graphics you see in AAA games. Also, 3D modeling only makes the mesh and the animations and such. You'd still have to add textures/UV maps to your models to make them not just gray figures with no color. Skyrim and games with high-quality, realistic graphics usually use bump maps (in short, they make textures look less flat) and other special techniques to make things look even better/more realistic.

When I got into Unity at the start, I was only interested in learning how to script with it, so I didn't get into 3D modeling and texturing right away. I got into it later, though, and picked up Blender for 3D modeling and GIMP for the textures (both free).

Now, I don't mean to try and totally discourage you from art if you want to try it. I'm just saying this because I wanted to make sure you knew what it was and that it's kind of its own thing. If you want to do it the way I did and focus on scripting for a while before getting into art, that's fine. If you want to learn 3D modeling and texturing while learning how to script, that's fine too. Really, it's all about what you're interested in. You don't even have to know how to do both unless you absolutely must make games all by yourself. If you don't like 3D modeling, you can wait until later when you're good enough at scripting to get a team to help you with the art.

Anyway, now that I've rambled on forever, here are some links and tuts for Blender and UnityScript:

[url="http://www.blender.org/"]Here's a link to the official Blender website[/url]

[url="http://www.blenderartists.org/forum/"]Here's a link to forums for Blender[/url] (if you have questions about Blender in the future, they might be better fit there than they would be here at GameDev)

[url="http://download.unity3d.com/support/Tutorials/1%20-%20GUI%20Essentials.pdf"]Here's a tutorial to Unity's basics[/url]

[url="http://download.unity3d.com/support/Tutorials/2%20-%20Scripting%20Tutorial.pdf"]and here's a tutorial to complete beginner's programming with UnityScript[/url]
That tutorial supposedly "assumes no prior programming experience", which I believe is what you're looking for.

Good luck and have fun!
1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
[quote name='GHMP' timestamp='1340139567' post='4950726']
Judging by the way you phrased that last question, I'm assuming you aren't fully aware of what Maya is, so I'll go into a bit of detail about it:

Maya is a 3D modeling program. In other words, it's used to make models and animate them so you can import them into your game and put them into the game world.

Blender is another 3D modeling program. It's free to install the full version. I use it and I think it has a genius design, though I'm not very talented with 3D modeling.

Now, with 3D modeling programs, you can make crates and characters and creatures...whatever you might need in your game, with enough skill, you can make it with 3D modeling. However, you should remember that 3D modeling is it's own thing, an entirely new practice compared to programming/scripting. It takes artistic skill and lots of practice before you'll start making the amazing graphics you see in AAA games. Also, 3D modeling only makes the mesh and the animations and such. You'd still have to add textures/UV maps to your models to make them not just gray figures with no color. Skyrim and games with high-quality, realistic graphics usually use bump maps (in short, they make textures look less flat) and other special techniques to make things look even better/more realistic.

When I got into Unity at the start, I was only interested in learning how to script with it, so I didn't get into 3D modeling and texturing right away. I got into it later, though, and picked up Blender for 3D modeling and GIMP for the textures (both free).

Now, I don't mean to try and totally discourage you from art if you want to try it. I'm just saying this because I wanted to make sure you knew what it was and that it's kind of its own thing. If you want to do it the way I did and focus on scripting for a while before getting into art, that's fine. If you want to learn 3D modeling and texturing while learning how to script, that's fine too. Really, it's all about what you're interested in. You don't even have to know how to do both unless you absolutely must make games all by yourself. If you don't like 3D modeling, you can wait until later when you're good enough at scripting to get a team to help you with the art.

Anyway, now that I've rambled on forever, here are some links and tuts for Blender and UnityScript:

[url="http://www.blender.org/"]Here's a link to the official Blender website[/url]

[url="http://www.blenderartists.org/forum/"]Here's a link to forums for Blender[/url] (if you have questions about Blender in the future, they might be better fit there than they would be here at GameDev)

[url="http://download.unity3d.com/support/Tutorials/1%20-%20GUI%20Essentials.pdf"]Here's a tutorial to Unity's basics[/url]

[url="http://download.unity3d.com/support/Tutorials/2%20-%20Scripting%20Tutorial.pdf"]and here's a tutorial to complete beginner's programming with UnityScript[/url]
That tutorial supposedly "assumes no prior programming experience", which I believe is what you're looking for.

Good luck and have fun!
[/quote]

I can get maya free, but Im not sure if I'll be going with it. I'll have to download blender and maya and see which one I think is better and check out the community! Arts really no problem for me, but we'll see later on! Thanks for the answer! And the links!

Chris
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
[quote name='Chris941' timestamp='1339934197' post='4950000']
It does help, and all the other comments help also! its just the question: how would i create this? but i'll learn that eventually i guess. Thanks!
[/quote]

I'll throw in a little pointer that helps me a lot. The best way to see results is to make incremental small changes. Make a goal that you can accomplish quickly. For me, this is usually a target of 1 hour or so. I like to accomplish a few of these small task, and that is very rewarding. It will make you happy to see how quickly you are achieving things. If you bite off too much in one go, it can be frustrating. Here are some examples of incremental changes in what you mentioned:

Get a catapult on the screen
Get the castle on the screen
Add a button to fire the catapult which pops up a message saying the catapult has been fired
Make the catapult fire a projectile
Add a buttons to spin the catapult left / right (projectile is possibly unaffected depending on how you coded it)
Make projectile fire based off of direction catapult is facing

After a bunch of these small items, you will eventually get to a point you will want to call done. I hope this helps.
1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
[quote name='Chris941' timestamp='1339723274' post='4949388']
Hi all!

I just started out in my indie game dev. Adventure and downloaded Unity, but the thought came in mind: which engine is better?

I read a comment that, and I quote "if you're new to the industry, the cryengine will bend you over and smack you till you cry" sounds hard!

But then I saw the Unreal Development Kit, and since Literal Epic Games have been created on it, and with some awesome lookin features, how does this compare to Unity?

I really want to test out the Unreal Development kit but I just downloaded Unity, so I want to know exactly which one will be better for me, as a complete beginner, and which one is easier!

[/quote]


From my hard experience with UDK, it is a very nice tool set with all of the industry standard middleware packages you could want, Speed Tree, Physx, Scaleform and the list goes on. Another great part of UDK is UnrealScript. Not only can you call directly into C++ functions with it, you can also invoke ActionScript directly too. This means you can for example, create fully working flash games and use UnrealScript to interface with them and then render to texture on an arcade machine (If you want to see a video of it I can post a link). You can also fully implement a database connection library in C++ and then use UnrealScript to post to a SQL database through the library (DLLBind). Don't even get me started on Kismet, Unreal Cascade, and the Material editor or I'll be here all night. All of this is available for free non commercially and if you want to sell a game it costs 99 USD for a UDK license and your sales are royalty free until you make 50,000 USD, at which point Epic claims 25% of your quarterly sales. Did I also mention that it is multi platform (everything except for the Wii).

The obvious downside to UDK is that UnrealScript is a pain in the ass to learn. Even though it is similar to C# and Java, there are some very powerful language features that take a bit of mental muscle to get under your belt (like how state programming is integrated into the language itself, or the configuration file system). Also, 75% of learning UnrealScript comes from learning the API that they provide (how Actors work, the Actor Component system etc) and it is a real pain because a lot of the code base isn't commented, though this gets better with each release.

As for Unity, I don't know because I've never used it, and probably never will because of the license fees. Why pay thousands of dollars for Unity when I can get Unreal Engine 3 for free, with all of the AAA middleware like SpeedTree, Physx, FaceFx etc. Plus if I decide to ship a title it only costs 99 dollars until I'm essentially loaded with money. If Unity offered a free version that doesn't have a trial period (if they do then I will surely try it out) then I would love to give it a second look.

[quote name='SimonForsman' timestamp='1340122874' post='4950624']
Maya is fairly expensive so it is probably a good idea to go with something else, (Blender is free and there are alot of tutorials both for it and for using it with Unity)
[/quote]

You can get any autodesk product for free from here (legally): [url="http://students.autodesk.com/"]students.autodesk.com[/url] Edited by M6dEEp
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
[quote name='M6dEEp' timestamp='1340167068' post='4950833']
You can get any autodesk product for free from here (legally): [url="http://students.autodesk.com/"]students.autodesk.com[/url]
[/quote]

Assuming you're a student or faculty member at some school or a participant in the autodesk assistance program.
You also aren't allowed to use the educational versions commercially (Which means that you're not allowed to put your game on portals such as kongregate etc (something alot of amateur gamedevs do to get a bit of extra income)
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Very true, but I like to assume that since we're in the beginner's forum that most folks here aren't going to go out and sell their very first "game" and that people here are likely students of some sort. I would also like to very much believe that I am subconsciously encouraging the younger people to go to college :).
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
[quote name='yoshscout' timestamp='1340160322' post='4950811']
[quote name='Chris941' timestamp='1339934197' post='4950000']
It does help, and all the other comments help also! its just the question: how would i create this? but i'll learn that eventually i guess. Thanks!
[/quote]

I'll throw in a little pointer that helps me a lot. The best way to see results is to make incremental small changes. Make a goal that you can accomplish quickly. For me, this is usually a target of 1 hour or so. I like to accomplish a few of these small task, and that is very rewarding. It will make you happy to see how quickly you are achieving things. If you bite off too much in one go, it can be frustrating. Here are some examples of incremental changes in what you mentioned:

Get a catapult on the screen
Get the castle on the screen
Add a button to fire the catapult which pops up a message saying the catapult has been fired
Make the catapult fire a projectile
Add a buttons to spin the catapult left / right (projectile is possibly unaffected depending on how you coded it)
Make projectile fire based off of direction catapult is facing

After a bunch of these small items, you will eventually get to a point you will want to call done. I hope this helps.
[/quote]

That's a good tip thanks! I will def. use it to start creating! Right now I'm trying to learn code. Now, what kind of stumps me is how is customization worked in? I'll have to find that out when the point comes. Again, very helpful tip, thanks!
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
@m6DEEp and Simon forsman,

Well I get the software for free (can qualify as a student, though I don't go to gaming school...) now the original plan when I'm finished with my first few projects I want to send them over on the web to wherever I can get a little extra money at first, then maybe port the better idea to a console or so. But you can't do that, what's the point?

M6dEEp- unity does have a full free version, but the only difference is, is that the unity free version people compare to a "trial" because you don't get some rendering, shading, glass refraction, and water features but other than that, it's full, free, and you can send your game away on the web.

>once I learn unreal script I will be sure to switch over to UDK, or maybe learn another for Cryengine! The Cryengine is really cool...but my laptop was running a forest demo at 2 fps...woops!

Thanks for the comments Simon forsman and m6dEEp! I really appreciate them! And hopefully my questions can all be answered!
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
[quote name='Chris941' timestamp='1340186546' post='4950905']
>once I learn unreal script I will be sure to switch over to UDK, or maybe learn another for Cryengine! The Cryengine is really cool...but my laptop was running a forest demo at 2 fps...woops!
[/quote]

The Cryengine is even more restricted than the UDK in game types that you can manage to build with it. The free SDK is a gloryfied map editor for Crysis 2. You are only able to make mods or even mutators for the game and not make a new game with it Edited by Apolyon6k
1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I actually advice you to start with Unity and have a c# reference book by side. like- deitels C# how to program, and then you come up with a fairly small game idea, try to get your feet wet, when stuck search for it until you find it, in the reference books or in online unity tutorials etc. in this way you will get a good idea in which direction to go and what to do. Good Luck [img]http://public.gamedev.net//public/style_emoticons/default/smile.png[/img]
2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Yes UDK is more biased toward action games, shooters especially. Do take note that you are mostly limited by your ingenuity and creativity. I have seen plenty of games created purely using Kismet (the engine's visual scripting language for those who don't know) albeit limited. The best advice I can give is to learn how to use the tools provided. The one thing that kind of sucks is that the engine's renderer makes things look pretty good with minimal amounts of effort, so you feel the constant pressure to have better art all the time. Well, at least it was that way for me.
1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
[quote name='Apolyon6k' timestamp='1340187998' post='4950910']
[quote name='Chris941' timestamp='1340186546' post='4950905']
>once I learn unreal script I will be sure to switch over to UDK, or maybe learn another for Cryengine! The Cryengine is really cool...but my laptop was running a forest demo at 2 fps...woops!
[/quote]

The Cryengine is even more restricted than the UDK in game types that you can manage to build with it. The free SDK is a gloryfied map editor for Crysis 2. You are only able to make mods or even mutators for the game and not make a new game with it
[/quote]

I see, that probably explains why there are people making Crysis 2 "sequels".
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
[quote name='M6dEEp' timestamp='1340217316' post='4951073']
Yes UDK is more biased toward action games, shooters especially. Do take note that you are mostly limited by your ingenuity and creativity. I have seen plenty of games created purely using Kismet (the engine's visual scripting language for those who don't know) albeit limited. The best advice I can give is to learn how to use the tools provided. The one thing that kind of sucks is that the engine's renderer makes things look pretty good with minimal amounts of effort, so you feel the constant pressure to have better art all the time. Well, at least it was that way for me.
[/quote]

Well at one point i'd like to make a shooter, but it'd have to be pretty unique, not remaking a game thats similar in gameplay or style (like most) i agree, limited by ingenuity and creativity...and knowledge. I think i'll stick with Unity, if its easier than UDK, and then switch over after i have some coding and a game under my belt.
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
New ambition: make a game with dinosaurs that doesnt suck...I have many scenarios already planned out...and it steers away from guns. Anyway do Unreal is better off for shooters, but Unity is easier to start off with? Just learned te GUI of Unity and needed a text editor to start scripting. Or do I not need one?
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0