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Shiro winds

What Should I learn first in Programming languages and Game engines?

11 posts in this topic

I'm 17 and getting in to the world of game design and programming i do not know where to start and I need help?
I have experience in unity so far but that is all.

so my questions are

What programming languages should I learn?
Which Game engines should I start off with?
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[url="http://www.gamefromscratch.com/post/2011/08/04/I-want-to-be-a-game-developer.aspx"]Read this[/url], it pretty much answers your question in more detail that I can go into here.



Also, why do people always list their ages... really... why? :)
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I might guess that people list their ages because they feel it gives an indication of the resources they have available to them. I might guess that someone who is 17 is still in school, can't afford to buy a high end computer or compiler, may be thinking about their career path and what colleges or university to attend, and has many years ahead to perfect his trade. Where as a person that says he's 36 probably already has a job, might be able to afford more equipment, might not be planning to go back to school to learn programming suggesting he might be more interested in books or online material than a younger person. All sorts of stereotypes you can draw by a person's age and it's easy to communicate them by simply saying, "I'm 17."
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[quote name='kseh' timestamp='1340215808' post='4951063']
I might guess that people list their ages because they feel it gives an indication of the resources they have available to them. I might guess that someone who is 17 is still in school, can't afford to buy a high end computer or compiler, may be thinking about their career path and what colleges or university to attend, and has many years ahead to perfect his trade. Where as a person that says he's 36 probably already has a job, might be able to afford more equipment, might not be planning to go back to school to learn programming suggesting he might be more interested in books or online material than a younger person. All sorts of stereotypes you can draw by a person's age and it's easy to communicate them by simply saying, "I'm 17."
[/quote]

That makes some sense, but even in that regard I would say "I am a poor student", from which I can infer much more information without relying on stereotypes.
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[quote name='kseh' timestamp='1340215808' post='4951063']
I might guess that people list their ages because they feel it gives an indication of the resources they have available to them. I might guess that someone who is 17 is still in school, can't afford to buy a high end computer or compiler, may be thinking about their career path and what colleges or university to attend, and has many years ahead to perfect his trade. Where as a person that says he's 36 probably already has a job, might be able to afford more equipment, might not be planning to go back to school to learn programming suggesting he might be more interested in books or online material than a younger person. All sorts of stereotypes you can draw by a person's age and it's easy to communicate them by simply saying, "I'm 17."
[/quote]

That is very true. But I, like many other young ones coming it to the world of game development seek help and guidance so we don't end up in a dead end job making the next My little pony game.
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[quote name='Shiro winds' timestamp='1340290368' post='4951358']
That is very true. But I, like many other young ones coming it to the world of game development seek help and guidance so we don't end up in a dead end job making the next My little pony game.
[/quote]

There is nothing wrong with making my little pony games. If you get a job making my little pony games you've succeeded extremely well and could most likely move on to a job at any small to mid sized studio quite easily if you feel like it.
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Actually, I would also take a My Little Pony job. I get the impression that working for a large studio has you working on a small piece of a game and not really seeing things come together for years and your contributions would be lost in a sea of developers. Of course, the prestige would be higher and probably the pay too. Personally, I'd rather work on a smaller games for smaller companies.

I can understand being worried about getting stuck in a dead-end job. But I think that if you're looking at getting into a programming career the dead-ends are less about the first language you learned and more about your drive to learn other languages, design skills, management skills, new technologies, and whatever else you can think of. When you don't bother to make yourself grow, you won't grow. Simple as that. (I should probably listen to my own advice there.)
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you know I nether thought of it that way so I guess if I get a job making a game like that I have at lest done something good.
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I see an epidemic of down-votes for no apparent reason. Oh well.

I would recommend going right into C++ programming. Learn to do things right from the start, and not lose time trying to correct yourself later on when you move up from higher level languages.

Learning game engines is irrelevant, because once you know the language, you'll be able to handle any engine in only a little time. If you run straight into learning engines before you undertand any of the code, you'll..

1) ...waste time.
2) ...get too comfortable doing simple stuff and not actually learning much.

Learn the laguages while you figure out exactly what you want to work with. Graphics, physics, gameplay, audio...? Find what you like, and focus on that until you can create an application that demonstrates something in that field. If you can do that, you've got a good chance at getting a job.

May sound harsh, but I'm just trying to steer you in what I believe to be a good direction.
Also, there's a lot of other threads with people asking the exact same thing you are asking, so check out those threads for more input.
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