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      Download the Game Design and Indie Game Marketing Freebook   07/19/17

      GameDev.net and CRC Press have teamed up to bring a free ebook of content curated from top titles published by CRC Press. The freebook, Practices of Game Design & Indie Game Marketing, includes chapters from The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, and An Architectural Approach to Level Design. The GameDev.net FreeBook is relevant to game designers, developers, and those interested in learning more about the challenges in game development. We know game development can be a tough discipline and business, so we picked several chapters from CRC Press titles that we thought would be of interest to you, the GameDev.net audience, in your journey to design, develop, and market your next game. The free ebook is available through CRC Press by clicking here. The Curated Books The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, Second Edition, by Jesse Schell Presents 100+ sets of questions, or different lenses, for viewing a game’s design, encompassing diverse fields such as psychology, architecture, music, film, software engineering, theme park design, mathematics, anthropology, and more. Written by one of the world's top game designers, this book describes the deepest and most fundamental principles of game design, demonstrating how tactics used in board, card, and athletic games also work in video games. It provides practical instruction on creating world-class games that will be played again and again. View it here. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, by Joel Dreskin Marketing is an essential but too frequently overlooked or minimized component of the release plan for indie games. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing provides you with the tools needed to build visibility and sell your indie games. With special focus on those developers with small budgets and limited staff and resources, this book is packed with tangible recommendations and techniques that you can put to use immediately. As a seasoned professional of the indie game arena, author Joel Dreskin gives you insight into practical, real-world experiences of marketing numerous successful games and also provides stories of the failures. View it here. An Architectural Approach to Level Design This is one of the first books to integrate architectural and spatial design theory with the field of level design. The book presents architectural techniques and theories for level designers to use in their own work. It connects architecture and level design in different ways that address the practical elements of how designers construct space and the experiential elements of how and why humans interact with this space. Throughout the text, readers learn skills for spatial layout, evoking emotion through gamespaces, and creating better levels through architectural theory. View it here. Learn more and download the ebook by clicking here. Did you know? GameDev.net and CRC Press also recently teamed up to bring GDNet+ Members up to a 20% discount on all CRC Press books. Learn more about this and other benefits here.
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spinydelta

New Indie Developers - Starting up a business

4 posts in this topic

Hello there! Just wanted to ask a few business questions. I was told this is a pretty good place to go if you're in need of help!

So before I get on to the questions, I just wanted to layout what I want to do [img]http://public.gamedev.net//public/style_emoticons/default/smile.png[/img]
I've started up an indie studio with a friend. We're wanting to sell games internationally, Via the internet. We are based in Melbourne, Australia. But our servers are hosted in the United States ( Amazon Web Services! ). We want to be able to sell our games both through our site, and through something like Steam.

So my first question is - Registering as a business.( As in, Business structure. ) There is myself, and a friend who have both co-founded the business together. I've thought about registering as a partnership, but there are some very confusing laws here in Australia. Like having to register in different states. So I'm confused if I can register in Victoria, and still be able to use the Business name internationally. Or whether I'm going to have to register as a company or something of the sort.

Another is taxing. The only thing I'm confused about here is where we'll have to pay tax. We're based here in Melbourne, Victoria. But all of the content is hosted in the US. So I'm not sure if I have to pay tax in the US as well as in Australia, or just in Australia or maybe something else ?

Finally, trademarks. I've read some threads on here about people shouldn't really need to worry about Trademarks when they first start off. And I know they're not cheap to do. But is that something I should look into doing because we're wanting to sell to an international market?

Thank you so much in advance to any replies!

Josh
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[quote name='spinydelta' timestamp='1340267607' post='4951258']
So my first question is - Registering as a business.( As in, Business structure. ) There is myself, and a friend who have both co-founded the business together. ... Like having to register in different states. So I'm confused if I can register in Victoria, and still be able to use the Business name internationally. Or whether I'm going to have to register as a company or something of the sort.
[/quote]

New rules which will make your life easier

[url="http://www.business.gov.au/businesstopics/registrationandlicences/registeryourbusinessorcompany/pages/registeryourbusinessname.aspx"]http://www.business.gov.au/businesstopics/registrationandlicences/registeryourbusinessorcompany/pages/registeryourbusinessname.aspx[/url]


[quote name='spinydelta' timestamp='1340267607' post='4951258']
Another is taxing. The only thing I'm confused about here is where we'll have to pay tax. We're based here in Melbourne, Victoria. But all of the content is hosted in the US. So I'm not sure if I have to pay tax in the US as well as in Australia, or just in Australia or maybe something else ?
[/quote]

See an accountant regarding this which you will need to do if you are setting up a business registered with A.S.I.C. due to the tax reporting requirements that makes them a basic necessity.

[quote name='spinydelta' timestamp='1340267607' post='4951258']
Finally, trademarks. I've read some threads on here about people shouldn't really need to worry about Trademarks when they first start off. And I know they're not cheap to do. But is that something I should look into doing because we're wanting to sell to an international market?
[/quote]

[url="http://www.business.gov.au/BusinessTopics/Intellectualproperty/Formallyregisteredrights/Pages/Trademarks.aspx"]http://www.business.gov.au/BusinessTopics/Intellectualproperty/Formallyregisteredrights/Pages/Trademarks.aspx[/url]


In addition I would very much recommend you step back into the business forum menu and read the F.A.Q.'s there as well head over to Tom Sloper's website. [url="http://www.sloperama.com/"]http://www.sloperama.com/[/url]
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Hi Josh,
Since I am not Australian, I can't tell you what Australian laws and regulations apply to your business. Here in the USA there is a government entity dedicated to helping small businesses, it's called the Small Business Administration. You could check and see whether Australia has something similar. I would think it probably does. You could then go to your local office and ask them your questions.

You can certainly use your business name internationally. While you may not need to register your trademark at this stage, you should work as hard as you can to make sure nobody else is using the name you choose. But it is conceivable for companies in different countries to use the same business name. You will want to retain a lawyer, no matter what (it's important). You should check the list of game attorneys at obscure.co.uk, and also see thegameattorney and underdevelopmentlaw and charnelaw.com.

As for taxes, if you do not have an office or a full-time person in the US, you don't have to pay US taxes. You can also read up on US taxes at irs.gov.
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[quote name='Tom Sloper' timestamp='1340290600' post='4951363']
Here in the USA there is a government entity dedicated to helping small businesses, it's called the Small Business Administration. You could check and see whether Australia has something similar. I would think it probably does. You could then go to your local office and ask them your questions.
[/quote]

Good point had got their link but forgot to put it in - The Australian Competition and Consumer Commision (ACCC) as well the Business Enterprise Centre (BEC)

[url="http://www.accc.gov.au/content/index.phtml/itemId/815214"]http://www.accc.gov.au/content/index.phtml/itemId/815214[/url]
[url="http://www.becaustralia.org.au/"]http://www.becaustralia.org.au/[/url]
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Income earned in the US by foreign companies is more than likely subject to US tax laws.

FYI - do a search for "Australia Tax Treaty" on the IRS website (www.irs.gov) and ask your accountant to confirm how it should apply to monies received from the US. Some US companies will withhold a percentage of royalties and report it to the IRS, unless you sign a Form W8BEN to get a reduced rate.
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