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      Download the Game Design and Indie Game Marketing Freebook   07/19/17

      GameDev.net and CRC Press have teamed up to bring a free ebook of content curated from top titles published by CRC Press. The freebook, Practices of Game Design & Indie Game Marketing, includes chapters from The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, and An Architectural Approach to Level Design. The GameDev.net FreeBook is relevant to game designers, developers, and those interested in learning more about the challenges in game development. We know game development can be a tough discipline and business, so we picked several chapters from CRC Press titles that we thought would be of interest to you, the GameDev.net audience, in your journey to design, develop, and market your next game. The free ebook is available through CRC Press by clicking here. The Curated Books The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, Second Edition, by Jesse Schell Presents 100+ sets of questions, or different lenses, for viewing a game’s design, encompassing diverse fields such as psychology, architecture, music, film, software engineering, theme park design, mathematics, anthropology, and more. Written by one of the world's top game designers, this book describes the deepest and most fundamental principles of game design, demonstrating how tactics used in board, card, and athletic games also work in video games. It provides practical instruction on creating world-class games that will be played again and again. View it here. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, by Joel Dreskin Marketing is an essential but too frequently overlooked or minimized component of the release plan for indie games. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing provides you with the tools needed to build visibility and sell your indie games. With special focus on those developers with small budgets and limited staff and resources, this book is packed with tangible recommendations and techniques that you can put to use immediately. As a seasoned professional of the indie game arena, author Joel Dreskin gives you insight into practical, real-world experiences of marketing numerous successful games and also provides stories of the failures. View it here. An Architectural Approach to Level Design This is one of the first books to integrate architectural and spatial design theory with the field of level design. The book presents architectural techniques and theories for level designers to use in their own work. It connects architecture and level design in different ways that address the practical elements of how designers construct space and the experiential elements of how and why humans interact with this space. Throughout the text, readers learn skills for spatial layout, evoking emotion through gamespaces, and creating better levels through architectural theory. View it here. Learn more and download the ebook by clicking here. Did you know? GameDev.net and CRC Press also recently teamed up to bring GDNet+ Members up to a 20% discount on all CRC Press books. Learn more about this and other benefits here.
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Blakbewewy

Cartoon-Style FPS - Unrestricted, customizable Game-play!

2 posts in this topic

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[background=rgb(250, 251, 252)][color=#282828]Hey there.

[b]For the past week or so, I've been coming up with ideas for a game similar to Team Fortress 2 in that it's a cartoon-style first person shooter[/b]. In this potential game (which is not yet named) it involves [b]non-restrictive, fully customizable game-play[/b] with all sorts of unique apparel, and achievements which can be [i]physically[/i] worn on the player as medals. As well as this, however, our main potential selling point is what I've nicknamed [b]"Creative Killing"[/b]. Creative Killing involves using indirect methods to kill your victim, and comes with several advantages.

A simple example of a Creative Kill involves your victim, who has not yet spotted you, crouched on the floor "hiding" while trying to regenerate health before entering the battle again. A large, heavy crate is suspended above his head attached only to the ceiling by a rope. Severing the rope by using some form of ranged weapon will drop the crate and instantly kill this victim. [b]That's a Creative Kill, and earns bonus points[/b].

However, let's say you decide to use your cutlass to directly kill him. By the time you reach him, he could've finished regenerating and turned round, giving him a chance to kill you. If he doesn't turn, it'll still take 3 to 5 hits to finish him off giving him an easy opportunity to either kill you, damage you or at least escape. Even if you do manage to kill him despite the odds against you, you won't have your lovely bonus points.

[b]That's why Creative Killing is a main selling point in this game[/b], as it's fun and earns bonus points, as well as giving you a higher survival chance (usually). Of course, I'm not just saying you should never use a direct kill; at times, it'll be much more convenient. However, a player never using Creative Kills will soon find that his/her points are low and that he/she has got a higher death rate.[/color][/background][/left]

[left][color=#282828][background=rgb(250, 251, 252)]Without being too revealing, a brief summary of the basic plot of the game is that [b]a time paradox has occurred for unknown reasons, bringing 7 different eras all to the same time and their populations with it[/b]. The game doesn't have classes, meaning people can mix and match different eras of clothing with different eras of weapons (however, the same era of weapon and clothing will give some sort of stat bonus). The 7 "classes" are Wizards, Cowboys, Knights, Pirates, Vikings, Victorians and Ninjas. [b]This brings very different and mixed combat (still balanced, as none of them have "proper" guns or modern weapons) without ruining the fun of an FPS[/b].[/background][/color]

[background=rgb(250, 251, 252)][color=#282828]For the sake of secrecy, I'm not giving anything more away; I'm basically looking for one or more programmers to help create this game. It won't be an easy task, so I probably won't accept anyone new to coding, but I know literally nothing of code so I can't do it alone. Anyone who is kind enough to help isn't paid until the game is complete, where some percentage of the final profit is promised depending on how much we make.

Anyone who wants to help will probably [/color][color=#ff0000][b][RECRUITING INFO REMOVED BY MODERATOR][/b][/color][color=#282828] just don't message me because I only just came to these forums and probably won't check them.

My dearest thanks to anyone who decides to help; as long as this project runs smoothly, I don't see why it'd fail!

Thanks again and hope to see someone soon.[/color][/background][/left] Edited by jbadams
Removed recruiting/contact info. Please use Classifieds for any recruiting.
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Sounds like its Mortal Kombat...meets "Night at the Museaum" MK for the part where you get more points the more gratuitousness the kill. This was also used in Sodlier of Fortune. In theory time paradox usually caused by triggering something in the past and its effects affecting events of he future. Mixing characters like "Night at the Museum" may be chaotic and easily loose any semblance of story that you are able to transmit with this concept. If this is your first project, simplify and get game-play to its essence. Then add window dressing..
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Recruiting must be done using our "[url="http://www.gamedev.net/classifieds"]classifieds[/url]" section (accessible from the top menu), not in the forums. People will probably want to know what you'll actually be contributing to the project as well.

Good luck!
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