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Chris941

Best 3d modelling software for beginners?

37 posts in this topic

[quote name='jwezorek' timestamp='1341937655' post='4957644']
Also when trying to learn Blender from tutorials or other online resources, make sure that you are using materials that specifically target the version of Blender that you have downloaded. The UI has changed a lot in recent years and it can be particularly frustrating to try to deal with a tutorial that is talking about GUI widgets that no longer exist.
[/quote]

This is perhaps the most irritating aspect of learning blender. Getting 2.5x or 2.6x versions of the documentation. Google always seem to send you to older stuff, even on the official wiki, even though it looks like its point you to the newer one.
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Thanks for that tip! I had downloaded the newest version of blender and was looking at older tutorials.
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[quote name='Chris941' timestamp='1342054532' post='4958221']
Thanks for that tip! I had downloaded the newest version of blender and was looking at older tutorials.
[/quote]

There was a big break in the continuity of the UI between 2.5x and everything that preceded it, which is what Serapth is talking about above. I haven't looked at Blender lately and am not sure what version they are up to -- still 2.6-something? -- but I'd imagine that any tutorial that is talking about a version greater than 2.5 will be relevant to you.

There's also this book:
[url="http://www.amazon.com/Blender-Foundations-Essential-Guide-Learning/dp/0240814304"]http://www.amazon.co...g/dp/0240814304[/url]
But personally I didn't find it that useful. Edited by jwezorek
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I started using blender a couple of years ago, but didnt get verry far with it. One tip i can give is to find a guide on customising the windows. I spent ages changing the perspective of the window everytime i wanted to see a different side at the start, but then i realised i could set up 4 windows viewing each part i was modelling.
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[u]*** Misfit Cubed ***[/u] is definitely the solution!


It's easy to use and it's [u]FREE[/u]!!! You can edit with it .Md2 and .Md3 models, and export .Md5 models.
It's the [u]BEST[/u]! [img]http://public.gamedev.net//public/style_emoticons/default/smile.png[/img]


[url="http://sourceforge.net/projects/misfitcubed/"]http://sourceforge.net/projects/misfitcubed/[/url]

In the case of .Md5 models, you can use this model viewer:

[url="http://home.mnet-online.de/der/modelviewer.rar"]http://home.mnet-online.de/der/modelviewer.rar[/url]
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Personally I suggest lightwave. You have a 30 day trial. Me i have tried and i loved them a lot ! He is simple and the little thing i hate of this modeling software is that the texture was not very good but for 3d modeling he is perfect. If your engine doesn't support the engine extension, you have a lot of export option like .obj .3ds .fbx.
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3DS Max, no brainer here. Except for the prohibitive price...

Milkshape is also acceptable if you are making something small, but if you try to use it after you tried 3DSMax you will scowl in pain and despair :)
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[quote name='Acharis' timestamp='1343458063' post='4963878']
Milkshape is also acceptable if you are making something small, but if you try to use it after you tried 3DSMax you will scowl in pain and despair [img]http://public.gamedev.net//public/style_emoticons/default/smile.png[/img]
[/quote]

Yeah, I didn't say anything about it because it seems like nobody uses it anymore, but I think, for what it is, Milkshape is a good application, and that it's a nice application to use for the absolute fist time you try to make a polygon-based model because it doesn't suffer from the feature overload of something like Blender. Not as intimidating, etc. The big question though is, what the hell ever happened to MilkShape?
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[quote name='Chris941' timestamp='1341607638' post='4956465']
So I downloaded blender, just have to read those tutorials!
[/quote]Got o BlenderCookie.com and watch the video tutorials. They do a great job there. They start with the interface, and then show you how to model stuff, and then show you how to get it running in Unity. Great site.
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edit: woops i posted in the wrong topic! sorry

but anyways might as well add to this,
blender is probably a good choice, but i also agree that there are a lot of 3ds max tutorials these days but its more complex Edited by mohq07
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I use Blender3D because it is free and can get the job done, but I recomend 3DS Max. It's more advanced and worth learning.
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Id recommend Blender by blender foundation at www.blender.org

Its a free software and easy to learn. =D
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[quote name='Chris941' timestamp='1341607638' post='4956465']
So I downloaded blender, just have to read those tutorials!
[/quote]

Blender can seem bizarre and illogical at first, but if you stick with its easily the best of the free modellers out there. I found that to really get the hang of Blender you have to use the keyboard shortcuts, not the menus. I made myself a cheat sheet where I wrote down all the keyboard commands I use all the time and it's been invaluable as a reference, especially if I don't use Blender for a month or so.

Re: The tutorials, just be aware that Blender is updated regularly and older tutorials won't necessarily make sense against the current version.
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