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wormhero1

How can I create a text based adventure game?

21 posts in this topic

I've wanted to make games for a while now. I started learning c# about a week ago. I know some basics, but I'm still learning it. I just wanted to ask how can I start to create a text based adventure game. I have yet to find a real tutorial on it. Can anyone give me some tips on creating one?
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There was a similar question I replied to a little while ago, here: [url="http://www.gamedev.net/topic/626072-what-do-i-need-to-learn-for-a-zork-clone-in-c/"]http://www.gamedev.n...ork-clone-in-c/[/url]

I gave some suggestions in the above link, if you have more specific questions I'll try and help.
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Your going to want to make a set of rooms in some sort of format, that have a variety of things in them and then load them from say an XML file. It's somewhat of an advanced thing to build for a beginner to C#. Have you done coding in any other languages?

I would recommend you start smaller then this, perhaps try making a game where their is a grid of locations that are drawn to the screen and it lets you move through the grid somewhat like a map. You can imagine using an array to store the information of where the person is, and then moving them through the array based on where they want to go. Then each area could have say a chance of getting attacked by say a monster, and then it would switch to a combat system. Where you would fight this monster before you can move again.

This [url="http://www.gamedev.net/topic/506587-c-text-adventure-design/"]thread[/url] may also prove useful. Edited by DevLiquidKnight
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I made a SUPER SIMPLE and probably poorly done text game in Java (which is very similar to C#). If you want to check it out as an example you can see the game and a link to the source [url="http://www.jdgamedev.com/my-first-finished-game-nameless"]on my website[/url].

What I did was build a class for each major concept that I wanted. Items, rooms, entities(players and monsters). The rooms were a bit tough to tackle. The simplest way I could imagine doing it was assigning exits to each room which were just other rooms themselves. When a player went though an exit they were put in the next room. If there was no exit in that direction(N S E or W) then it was null and did not allow traversal.

My source code will explain in better but if you have any questions, feel free to ask: myself and the other programmers here will be able to help. Good luck.
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This is my first coding language. What are some suggestions for creating a game simpler?
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[quote name='nugget850' timestamp='1341472770' post='4955875']
This is my first coding language. What are some suggestions for creating a game simpler?
[/quote]

I think just about everyone would like simpler (read better) code. What I find helps me the most is making sure that I know what I want to do before I start coding. Thinking about what you are going to program is a huge part of programming. Even if you don't know exactly what data structures you will use to solve a problem, just make sure that you understand what needs to get done.

My answer is pretty abstract, but there really is no language specific advice to give for that question. It's all about how you tackle the problem.
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[quote name='kseh' timestamp='1341514715' post='4956059']
So the best tips I can give would be to; get creative with what you know, plan the best you can, give the plan a try, don't be afraid to fail, learn something about what you did, and repeat.
[/quote]
I couldn't agree more. Either you succeed with what you want to do, which is fine. Or you don't succeed to get what you want. The failure is unfortunately one of the best ways to learn. That is when you start to appreciate design patterns. Without having done the failure first, it can be hard to understand why a specific design patterns are used.
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To the OP, if you think that a text game is easier to do than a graphical one, you may be mistaken.

Well..

A text adventure is probably the most focused type of game you can make. The complexity of assets like textures, models, animations, whatever is not there. :)

You can concentrate on the text, the logic and the code.

That sounds easier in my ears.

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I've actually been wanting to make one for years, but I've also had that pic waiting for years... Perfect timing! I get to use that pic and this thread might just spur me on to make a text adventure game! Now I just need a story. But that's a topic for another thread in another forum...

 

As a side note, although completely relevant, the forum software alerts you when you are about to post in a thread older than 60 days:

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I disagree. They lost favor with the introduction of interactive computer graphics, but the lack of graphics makes the developer focus on the story; Something that I think has been lost. The lack of graphics has one other advantage and that is that you must actually think to win. Depending on the amount of time spent developing the story and world, they can be even more challenging than CGI-based games. You easily forget where you are in the world, what direction to go, what inventory you have. It's like playing Skyrim blindfolded. You have to use your imagination and memory. You need both of those less with visuals.

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The necromancer is Vollkrasser who - rather suspiciously - chooses his first post to resurrect a 3 year old topic and post a link, not heeding that old topic warning.

 

@MarkS: at least you get to that point of complexity when developing a text adventure. Most computer graphics programmers never get there because of the huge scope.

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