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The Dragon King, an innovative open world RPG

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Aerin    136
On a side note Captain Andrew,

Are you actually a quantum physicist? Where did you study? I'm studying astronomy, and engineering.

[b]On topic:[/b]

I think there's only one project I've seen reach it's goal and go beyond it's goal on Kickstarter. That project was Wasteland 2 whom the original creators who have an impressive history in the gaming industry are backing. People trust their words based on their notable history, and success in the past. Most Kickstarter projects don't have anything in the way of evidence to prove their project's existence, and that it won't fail. It's like a completely new website for all the indie internet teams to go and reside and secure funding when they don't have anything to show.

I've never been one to simply toss a persons eagerness out the window. I do however know that in many cases like yours, you need something presentable. The image you have of a dragon is the first step. All your content must be original in some way. I hate using other people's stuff to make my own projects. You should definitely have a multitude of presentable content to demonstrate that this isn't simply something you came up with last weekend. Even if it is, having content to show others prior to starting a Kickstarter project might be essential for you.

Almost every time I've seen a successful indie project they've always included images, and video of their development. Models, textures, gameplay videos (alpha 0.001 builds), music. They also have a presentable self image. Things are organized and neat. Prior to Kickstarter this was all I ever saw, and those who didn't follow this guideline often either failed or would start a new project all together.

This is in no way a reference to Gamedev.net's old help wanted forum's guideline rules. However that included basic requirements detailing the projects and people who provided evidence of their development, people who had little to no money, often were the ones who had the most positive feedback. You don't need to make money to make a playable or presentable model of your game, or even data such as models, textures, or animations. However All these things can help substantiate your claims, and ideas even further. You don't even need a playable model of your game.

It get's people interested in what you're working on. You don't even need a Kickstarter at the moment. That is solely my opinion though.

Dat eye candy, yo.

I'm a long time lurker. Edited by Aerin

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Aloha Aerin. If you are asking if I have a degree in quantum physics, the answer is no. I am self taught. I appreciate the review and I do agree with the need for something presentable in lieu of industry experience. I am currently working on a tech demo and I should have it posted by tomorrow night. I managed to find Kickstarter in my search for the current license holder for the Shadowrun series and was surprised to see how well they did with their project. Of course they are well known developers and Shadowrun Returns has been a long time coming. I am glad you understand the original point of my post and I completely agree, I don't need Kickstarter but the format is a great way to share the project. Edited by Captain Andrew Brewer

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I have updated the Kickstarter page to include a simple tech demo of our rendering method. Please take a look and let me know what you think. Its a video only clip but I will update it in the morning to include a brief explanation and some additional features.

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WavyVirus    884
[quote name='Captain Andrew Brewer' timestamp='1342266432' post='4959050']
I have updated the Kickstarter page to include a simple tech demo of our rendering method. Please take a look and let me know what you think. Its a video only clip but I will update it in the morning to include a brief explanation and some additional features.
[/quote]

I think that some explanation is required - what exactly am I looking at here? It looks like spheres moving in a pattern, rendered in the normal way. Maybe the movement of these spheres is somehow related to quantum mechanics, but I do not see how this relates to a new rendering method.

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Aerin    136
Hey Captain Andrew,

Was this done in a game engine? I'm not sure what rendering method it's meant to demonstrate. The particle behavior seem to mimic that of nParticles, or any other particle simulation made using feild modifiers to control particle behavior. It looks like a particle emitter that's emitting a random seed controlled by a field, and/or soft body collisions. Is there any technical information you can provide? Was this done inside of a 3D application outside of a game engine or done inside a game engine.

I'd love to talk about some of the technology you use.

It seems like the object itself is an emitter. If it is, do you plan on editing the lifespan on the particles that are emitted from the object, or, even if they are being emitted from a locator what will their lifespan be? I'm also very interested in what use you have for what you have demoed. Edited by Aerin

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Aloha Aerin. I have updated the Kickstarter video to include 3 simple demonstrations of the granule modeling and rendering system. The demo was created using the [url="http://spark.developpez.com/index.php?page=home&lang=en"]SPARK[/url] physics engine and [url="http://www.blender.org/"]Blender[/url]. SPARK is written in C++ using only the STL and Blender uses Python. This method provides the foundation for our game engine so technically its done in a 3D application. The algorithms used to control the granule emitter and the granules themselves are the major difference between a particle physics system and our granule physics system. The demo itself has very limited uses, but due to the extreme scalability of the method we are able to create entire planets rather easily. There are still quite a few finishing touches to be made, but we are steadily progressing. The end result will be environments that practically build themselves and can be destroyed down to a granular level. Let me know what you think. Edited by Captain Andrew Brewer

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Aerin    136
That's actually very impressive Andrew. It reminds me of another technology company that I can't remember the name of. They have one very popular video online that demonstrates how their engine works, but basically environments, and objects are made up of tiny virtual atoms processed by a point cloud server if I remember correctly. Objects wouldn't need textures because each individual point that makes up an object (something in the hundreds of billions) has a specific color value.

It seems like it could be a realistic future for gaming, and virtual technology. Science, medicine, manufacturers, etc. If the kind of direction your taking this in is similar to that of being able to build worlds at a granular, or atomic level then you have my full attention. I'm eagerly awaiting more information.

You should start a developers blog that discusses daily, weekly, or biweekly any new developments you've made in the technology you're using. That would be an interesting read.

I'll be honest, I'm not entirely sure how to properly word my response.

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I appreciate the vote of confidence and I agree that I should get a developers blog going. As stated before it is quite a juggling act to keep the development of this project going and getting our website up and running is next on the priority list. The company you are referring to is called Euclideon and their infinite detail technology is really quite amazing. It is not quite the same as our granular modeling but it is really close, the key difference being our string theory algorithm. NeoGenesis supports the Open Source and Free Software Initiatives and we intend to make our innovations available to everyone free of charge. The applications of this type of system are really quite extensive and we intend to produce designs for many of them. Our next update shouldn't be too far away and I hope to see you all there.

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Stormynature    5198
Three questions.

1) What happened to this game you were developing 3 years ago? [url="http://andrewbrewer.webs.com/"]http://andrewbrewer.webs.com/[/url]
2) Why do you use military ranks?
3) What did you write that made you an established writer?

It is in my nature to examine a person's character if they are asking me to invest money in them. I tend to use the net to do so, as I would expect of most Kickstarter contributors in the absence of a well presented campaign.

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FLeBlanc    3141
Just out of curiosity, why are there only a couple seconds of "fight" at the end of a long and rather boring sphere demo? You're trying to make an RPG, right? I'd think that it would be [i]far[/i] more relevant to scrap the sphere demo and do a full demo showing a more fleshed out fight instead.

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Aerin    136
I'd also like to see more. I'm interested in a more in depth visual demonstration involving characters, structures and other objects. Is there any current limitation on how much damage something can take? Look's like you could make a really cool surgical simulation with this. This would also be really cool to see in a SAW like game. Every cut you make stays and can be effected by the previous cut.

I'm also curious if you're able to convert objects into granules. Say I modeled a statue. Is there any limitation to where an object can be damaged i.e: a sword strike leaves an impression or cut where it hit. And, is there any polygon budget that you have to adhere to?

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Aloha Stormynature. The game you are referring to was a failed attempt at developing a The Legend of Zelda fan game. There were several factors that contributed to its failure but the main reason was a lack of dedication. I created a team of DIY developers from around the net and we agreed to work together at no cost to make our game. It only lasted for a few months before the team disbanded. You may notice the characters from the fight scene look similar to certain Nintendo copyrighted characters, it is because they are assets that were created for the failed fan game. My company structure pulls its inspiration from the command hierarchy of a maritime vessel. The chain of command model found on board a maritime vessel allows us to create an ordered structure to easily manage our workload and development process. The only writing I have published is through local media, i.e. newspapers, community magazines, etc. I have quite a few short stories and several in depth articles about the state of my nation. I do appreciate the thorough review of both myself and my company. Let me know if you have any other questions.

@ FLeBlanc - I appreciate the review and I suppose the old adage "You get what you pay for" is quite relevant here. I totally agree that I would do well to have an elaborate and fully functioning demo, but until I can get more funding to continue development I will have to settle for what my own meager skills can accomplish. Honestly I don't think its that bad for being well outside my skill set.

@ Aerin - It will be slow going, but I will eventually update the demo with a more in depth demonstration and I will be sure to let you know when I do. The system itself has no inherent limitations in regards to the amount of damage a single object can take, but everything is based off of real world physics and consequences so there is a breaking point for most things. The scenario you describe is one of the selling points of this system. All models can be made granular regardless of polygon count and will become completely interactive upon conversion. This allows us to have truly destructible environments and characters that suffer real consequences based on our vital points life system. Edited by Captain Andrew Brewer

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In other news, I have just learned that a friend of mine will be joining the development team as a casual writer until we can secure more funding. He runs an online pen and paper Star Wars [url="http://homepages.ihug.co.nz/~pbgilbert/rpg/index3.htm"]campaign[/url] that has been active for quite some time now. This is really exciting for me so I thought I would share it.

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Aerin    136
Andrew,

You know, what you're developing sounds really incredible. I'm not as excited about the game as I am about this system you're developing. Since it currently isn't an independent program, you're limited to using this in Blender, and the SPARK Particle Engine correct?

I don't see why funding is so necessary at the moment. In fact I would consider dropping the development of the game entirely, and start working as often as you can on this system. I'm sure you have things to tend to in daily life, but developing this system seems like something you should focus entirely on.

It would be spectacular to see it develop into it's own standalone program. You could even write support for other programs to use it, say, other game engines. You could even provide compatibility for other 3D applications. Autodesk Maya was built with C++, and Python. MEL script, or Maya Embedded Language simplifies commands in Maya and could be written to execute commands related to the application inside of Maya, or to even build plug-in based support allowing you to add to the UI. Of course, the people over at Blender.org would be just as grateful I'm sure.

I could see more people supporting this as a standalone program. Being able to integrate it into other game engines and 3d applications could make it very popular as well. I'd envision myself willing to support something like that. Something I would contribute money to, in fact, something I would buy all together. I would definitely think about working on this as hard as you can and push out as much demo material as possible. Get people excited that you're developing a new technology.

It's seriously something I would have so much fun with. It would make animation, and particle simulation a hell of a lot easier. Special effects can even be applied to a system like this. Without a massive impact to performance there's a lot I can see myself doing with something like this. At the moment I'm forced to cache all simulated particles so I can play them back smoothly to identify artifacts, and make changes. That's only in cases when a simulation requires more than a few million points, but what you're describing could very well become an essential tool for artists.

I think your Kickstarter should revolve solely around this system you're developing. However, I do think it's very early to start a Kickstarter. You should wait until you have a multitude on content to show.

I... I'm actually very excited about this system you're working on. I think, that even if, you don't make a game. If you worked on making this system into a standalone program, and didn't use Kickstarter and presented this as a product. It would sell. It would just require your time. Not all of it, but a bit of it each day.

Heck, I'm not a programmer. Is it content creation, and hiring extra programmers to work on this the reason behind needing funding? You can easily create something on your own or in small circles that won't incur any major costs. I'd help you create content just for the demonstration of the system you're developing. I wouldn't charge either.

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Aloha Aerin. I appreciate the support and the words of wisdom. Allow me to briefly explain why we decided to launch this system as a video game. I have often thought it would be wise to develop it as a stand alone program and I can't tell you how many more hours I have spent thinking it over. In the end I always come to the conclusion that for this system to reach its maximum potential, work effectively as a stand alone program and remain competitive on a global market it needs more than just a revolutionary modeling and rendering method. We decided that in order for this system to have the desired effect on the industry, it needs an intuitive and equally interactive IDE that is easy to use for even the most inexperienced developer. This approach presented its own obstacles and each solution had one thing in common, video games. It didn't take us long to realize that video games provide the perfect avenue on which to launch this new technology and overcome a few hurdles that were in our way. There are still a few hurdles remaining and with a little more funding the system will be complete. It will then launch as a video game that includes the IDE and teaches you how to use it by playing the game. The games we develop all have this in common, they serve the secondary function of teaching the average player how to use the IDE and create their own content to use in their own adventures and share with the video game community. We believe this to be the most effective approach for instigating the change we feel the industry is longing for. I still intend to freely distribute this innovation, but in order for us as a company to endure the revolution that is sure to follow we need to assert our own ability with the system and establish ourselves as the benchmark for its capability.

I hope you don't take it personally, but I have to decline your offer to help us for free. I don't doubt your dedication or your skills, but as a matter of professional integrity I do not accept free work.

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Aerin    136
Hey Andrew,

I understand now. As I was reading with Euclideon, they are developing their technology to be used in game development, as well, potentially in other industries such as medicine. So I see why integrating this system into a game serves as one of the best possible ways to demonstrate it's capabilities. Something anyone can use for learning or entertainment. So, I think you're right. I still stand by my earlier post though without regard to dropping the game, that it should be standalone. Perhaps this is a course you can take after the game's completion? Honestly, what you've shown makes me jump up in excitement.

No worries, I don't take your decline personally. In fact it's great to hear you're intent on not accepting free work. Maybe it will urge some people to work on building their portfolios if they're interested in working with you. It may even help people generate some kind of income. Creating jobs... I like that. Do you accept paid freelance work? I understand this is better suited for the Help Wanted class field. However I'm just curious.

Well, I have your website, Kickstarter, and this page bookmarked. I'm following it so I eagerly await new updates. Edited by Aerin

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