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sankrant

Writing a game engine in Rust

11 posts in this topic

Rust programming language can be the next systems programming language and can be great for game programming.
My question is how much logistic and scripting support should I get if I write a game engine in rust....
My next question is, Should I wait for the 0.3 release or a beta release...
Can anyone probably guess if a systems programming language will be used in future to write game engines, and not managed application languages?
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Can I embed asm, lua and any other high level language in a premature game engine writern in rust??
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[quote][b]11 Interacting with foreign code[/b]
One of Rust's aims, as a system programming language, is to interoperate well with C code.[/quote]The Lua VM is a C API, so yes, you should be able to use it from Rust easily.[quote]My question is how much logistic and scripting support should I get if I write a game engine in rust....[/quote]Can you re-phrase the question? I don't understand what you're asking.[quote]Can anyone probably guess if a systems programming language will be used in future to write game engines, and not managed application languages?[/quote]That's been the trend so far, with C++ being the popular systems programming language. It will be a long time until managed languages replace C++ for this job. Edited by Hodgman
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the question to be rephraced is self answered... thanks.( it meant canned libraries and tools)

I started using rust because everybody says that C++ is less used now, and its future is just like cobol.

Talking about C++
Why there is much talk (and scoldings to me for 'wasting my time with c++') about using a managed language at systems programming sphere??
Are you sure C++ has a bright future? (at least in game engines)???
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[quote name='sankrant' timestamp='1341469113' post='4955856']
I started using rust because everybody says that C++ is less used now, and its future is just like cobol.
[/quote]

I dont think c++ is less used now than it was five years ago, and i dont think c++ will be going out soon either.
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Then who are those people who misguide young people like me?
Why my freinds laugh at me when I use c++?

So according to you, we will not be switching languages, and keep on using newer standards of c++ only(in present case c++11)?????
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[quote name='sankrant' timestamp='1341472849' post='4955876']
Why my freinds laugh at me when I use c++?
[/quote]

Do they only use managed languages?? I told some of my buddies that I wanted to learn C++ and I got weird looks followed by the all too common question "Why".
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[quote name='M6dEEp' timestamp='1341474599' post='4955882']
[quote name='sankrant' timestamp='1341472849' post='4955876']
Why my freinds laugh at me when I use c++?
[/quote]

Do they only use managed languages?? I told some of my buddies that I wanted to learn C++ and I got weird looks followed by the all too common question "Why".
[/quote]

And thats the main reason that makes me ask about the status of c++ at present, and obviuosly at the future...

Can someone solidly state about the future of game programming and the future of c++ ?????
In future, are we going to see c++xx or c# or something else like rust??
Who is right? My freinds or my soul??

There are many questions(especially doubts about my skills..) to be answered.
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[quote name='sankrant' timestamp='1341476507' post='4955894']
Can someone solidly state about the future of game programming and the future of c++ ?????
In future, are we going to see c++xx or c# or something else like rust??
Who is right? My freinds or my soul??
[/quote]

I guess it's not possible to solidly state any future but it doesn't seem like C++ is going away for a while.
If you learn C++ (or any other language really) it will be quite easy to learn any other language. Programming is a skill and the language is just a tool.
You don't risk "wasting" your time learning a specific language.
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[quote name='sankrant' timestamp='1341476507' post='4955894']
And thats the main reason that makes me ask about the status of c++ at present, and obviuosly at the future...

Can someone solidly state about the future of game programming and the future of c++ ?????
In future, are we going to see c++xx or c# or something else like rust??
Who is right? My freinds or my soul??

There are many questions(especially doubts about my skills..) to be answered.
[/quote]

As for the current state, it is used less in general these days for application level work (With C# taking a very large chunk from it), game logic is being moved to higher level languages(Lua, Python, C#, and many others are common), as a systems programming language it is still standing strong though (And thus it is the most commonly used language in game engines).

As for the future it really is impossible to tell, C++ is severely flawed, (its getting better and better but its far from perfect), Most system programming languages however suffer from similar problems, Rather than replacing C++ as a language for game engines in the near future i'd expect us to get better tools and libraries, (The industry is heavily invested in C++ so a new systems programming language has to be significantly better to take over making it fairly unlikely to happen)
Things like compilers that actually tell you what you did wrong (clang is miles ahead here and i'm sure gcc and msvc will follow suit) and libraries such as boost(Allthough C++11 includes most of the good features from it) go a long way to make C++ far less of a pain in the ass and more will come.
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Thank you all..

I am conviced that, we would not be switching anything, but willbe building better things upon the infrastructure..
We will continue to use C++ for engines, and use HL Languages for logic for a considerably long future ahead.
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