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Inuyashakagome16

Setting up for a team project

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So after some time I've finally decided to start a team project with a friend of mine. (Working on a SFML/DX project)
However my issue is, I don't really have money to buy VS 2011/2012. The express versions don't support source control so those really can't help.

So now i'm wondering, what IDE can I use in a team environment that will allow me to commit and pull down the newest version of our project?

Or, is there a program I can use with Code::Blocks or NetBeans or even VS Express to commit and etc?

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I've used Subclipse with Eclipse [s]and AnkhSVN with VisualStudio[/s] (nevermind, I use full-blown VS, they still don't play with Express). But why not just use a shell-installed tool (or even command line) like Tortoise? Are you specifically looking for IDE integration so you don't have to press as many buttons?

With Tortoise, it's as simple as opening the folder in explorer, right click -> "SVN Update", write code, make sure it doesn't break anything, and when you're done go to the same folder in explorer (optionally selecting only certain files) and right click -> "SVN Commit". I do this all the time from my work machine (where I could only install the express edition to dabble in some projects during lunch) and it has yet to break anything on the IDE-integrated side on my home system. Under the hood, SVN doesn't know you're talking to it through any particular medium. IDE plugin, shell plugin, command line...no difference.

Edit: needed to mention - all my comments deal specifically with SVN as your source control. There are other tools as well, most notably Git and Hg. Edited by BCullis

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So pretty much Tortoise is just source control with out the GUI? I mean I don't mind right clicking on a folder and committing that's fine. It's just a source control of sorts that could be used with Express from what you've said. That sounds pretty good. :o Is there a way to use a version system with Tortoise? I'm looking it up after I type this up but I figured I would ask.

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Is there a way to use a version system with Tortoise?


Do you mean the option of tracking past versions of files and being able to revert your directory to any past revision? If yes, then Tortoise is what you're looking for. It even has a nice interface (when you press commit you can decide which files to add). Not only that but in the case of a conflict you can look at the two files side by side and Tortoise shows you what is conflicting and offers you options how to resolve the conflict. Edited by bonus.2113

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[background=rgb(250, 251, 252)]So pretty much Tortoise is just source control with out the GUI[/background]


[/quote]

Tortoise is not a source control system, it's just a utility client for subversion or git. It provides icons overlay and context menu in the windows explorer to help manage source repository or working copy without using the command line (source control systems such as subversion or git always comes as command line tools)

There are different version of Tortoise each dedicated to a specific source control such as Tortoise SVN for subversion, Tortoise git for git.

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[quote name='Inuyashakagome16' timestamp='1341939911' post='4957662']
Is there a way to use a version system with Tortoise?


Do you mean the option of tracking past versions of files and being able to revert your directory to any past revision? If yes, then Tortoise is what you're looking for. It even has a nice interface (when you press commit you can decide which files to add). Not only that but in the case of a conflict you can look at the two files side by side and Tortoise shows you what is conflicting and offers you options how to resolve the conflict.
[/quote]
For a free application that's impressive. O_O
Pretty much that's what I mean't. I would probably use it where if there was an issue we could roll back and check that version if possible. That along with some sort of auto build maker. For testing purposes :P

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[background=rgb(250, 251, 252)]So pretty much Tortoise is just source control with out the GUI[/background]




Tortoise is not a source control system, it's just a utility client for subversion or git. It provides icons overlay and context menu in the windows explorer to help manage source repository or working copy without using the command line (source control systems such as subversion or git always comes as command line tools)

There are different version of Tortoise each dedicated to a specific source control such as Tortoise SVN for subversion, Tortoise git for git.
[/quote]
So it's GIT but a user friendly version it seems? I've installed it and it seems like that is the case.

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Just to clarify: the tool that does all the version control, upload/download of the repository, diff checking, conflict alerts, and so on: that's SVN, or Git, or Hg. It's all done via command line arguments. These are tools for version control, which is what you would search under if you wanted to know more about the process in general.

Tortoise is a shell plugin (i.e. it modifies Windows Explorer) that gives you handy ways around doing everything through the command line. Instead of navigating to your local repository folder on command line and typing "svn commit" with possible argument flags, you just right click in the repository window and select the commit option. Tortoise also gives you an easier interface for controlling settings like repository address, username and saved password, adding comments to commits, and so on.

IDE plugins like Subclipse and AnkhSVN just take the idea of shell plugins one step further. With Ankh, I have the SVN icons on each file in my project explorer inside Visual Studio, and I can right click a project and update it or commit it directly from the IDE.

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Okay so really what i was asking about was SVN, Git or Hg. Tortoise is just a tool to help make that process easier. :) Okay I understand that now. After looking it up it seems pretty simple to get into. I've just gotta setup a GIT / local server of some kind and I'll set Tortoise with it.

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Okay so really what i was asking about was SVN, Git or Hg. Tortoise is just a tool to help make that process easier. smile.png Okay I understand that now. After looking it up it seems pretty simple to get into. I've just gotta setup a GIT / local server of some kind and I'll set Tortoise with it.


At work we use https://bitbucket.org/ for our git repositories, it works great. (Allthough cloning large repos can be a bit slow and its only free for up to 5 users)

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