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Inuyashakagome16

Setting up for a team project

20 posts in this topic

So after some time I've finally decided to start a team project with a friend of mine. ([b]Working on a SFML/DX project[/b])
However my issue is, I don't really have money to buy VS 2011/2012. The express versions don't support source control so those really can't help.

[b]So now i'm wondering, what IDE can I use in a team environment that will allow me to commit and pull down the newest version of our project? [/b]

[b]Or, is there a program I can use with Code::Blocks or NetBeans or even VS Express to commit and etc? [/b]
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So pretty much Tortoise is just source control with out the GUI? I mean I don't mind right clicking on a folder and committing that's fine. It's just a source control of sorts that could be used with Express from what you've said. That sounds pretty good. :o Is there a way to use a version system with Tortoise? I'm looking it up after I type this up but I figured I would ask.
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[quote name='Inuyashakagome16' timestamp='1341939911' post='4957662']
Is there a way to use a version system with Tortoise?
[/quote]

Do you mean the option of tracking past versions of files and being able to revert your directory to any past revision? If yes, then Tortoise is what you're looking for. It even has a nice interface (when you press commit you can decide which files to add). Not only that but in the case of a conflict you can look at the two files side by side and Tortoise shows you what is conflicting and offers you options how to resolve the conflict. Edited by bonus.2113
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[quote]
[left][background=rgb(250, 251, 252)]So pretty much Tortoise is just source control with out the GUI[/background][/left]
[/quote]

Tortoise is not a source control system, it's just a utility client for[b] subversion[/b] or [b]git[/b]. It provides icons overlay and context menu in the windows explorer to help manage source repository or working copy without using the command line (source control systems such as subversion or git always comes as command line tools)

There are different version of Tortoise each dedicated to a specific source control such as Tortoise SVN for subversion, Tortoise git for git.
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[quote name='bonus.2113' timestamp='1341940820' post='4957667']
[quote name='Inuyashakagome16' timestamp='1341939911' post='4957662']
Is there a way to use a version system with Tortoise?
[/quote]

Do you mean the option of tracking past versions of files and being able to revert your directory to any past revision? If yes, then Tortoise is what you're looking for. It even has a nice interface (when you press commit you can decide which files to add). Not only that but in the case of a conflict you can look at the two files side by side and Tortoise shows you what is conflicting and offers you options how to resolve the conflict.
[/quote]
For a free application that's impressive. O_O
Pretty much that's what I mean't. I would probably use it where if there was an issue we could roll back and check that version if possible. That along with some sort of auto build maker. For testing purposes :P
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[quote name='renega_666' timestamp='1341941123' post='4957671']
[quote]
[left][background=rgb(250, 251, 252)]So pretty much Tortoise is just source control with out the GUI[/background][/left]
[/quote]

Tortoise is not a source control system, it's just a utility client for[b] subversion[/b] or [b]git[/b]. It provides icons overlay and context menu in the windows explorer to help manage source repository or working copy without using the command line (source control systems such as subversion or git always comes as command line tools)

There are different version of Tortoise each dedicated to a specific source control such as Tortoise SVN for subversion, Tortoise git for git.
[/quote]
So it's GIT but a user friendly version it seems? I've installed it and it seems like that is the case.
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Just to clarify: the tool that does all the version control, upload/download of the repository, diff checking, conflict alerts, and so on: that's SVN, or Git, or Hg. It's all done via command line arguments. These are tools for [b]version control[/b], which is what you would search under if you wanted to know more about the process in general.

Tortoise is a shell plugin (i.e. it modifies Windows Explorer) that gives you handy ways around doing everything through the command line. Instead of navigating to your local repository folder on command line and typing "svn commit" with possible argument flags, you just right click in the repository window and select the commit option. Tortoise also gives you an easier interface for controlling settings like repository address, username and saved password, adding comments to commits, and so on.

IDE plugins like Subclipse and AnkhSVN just take the idea of shell plugins one step further. With Ankh, I have the SVN icons on each file in my project explorer inside Visual Studio, and I can right click a project and update it or commit it directly from the IDE.
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Okay so really what i was asking about was SVN, Git or Hg. Tortoise is just a tool to help make that process easier. :) Okay I understand that now. After looking it up it seems pretty simple to get into. I've just gotta setup a GIT / local server of some kind and I'll set Tortoise with it.
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[quote name='Inuyashakagome16' timestamp='1341943370' post='4957689']
Okay so really what i was asking about was SVN, Git or Hg. Tortoise is just a tool to help make that process easier. [img]http://public.gamedev.net//public/style_emoticons/default/smile.png[/img] Okay I understand that now. After looking it up it seems pretty simple to get into. I've just gotta setup a GIT / local server of some kind and I'll set Tortoise with it.
[/quote]

At work we use https://bitbucket.org/ for our git repositories, it works great. (Allthough cloning large repos can be a bit slow and its only free for up to 5 users)
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[quote name='SimonForsman' timestamp='1341946237' post='4957720']
[quote name='Inuyashakagome16' timestamp='1341943370' post='4957689']
Okay so really what i was asking about was SVN, Git or Hg. Tortoise is just a tool to help make that process easier. [img]http://public.gamedev.net//public/style_emoticons/default/smile.png[/img] Okay I understand that now. After looking it up it seems pretty simple to get into. I've just gotta setup a GIT / local server of some kind and I'll set Tortoise with it.
[/quote]

At work we use [url="https://bitbucket.org/"]https://bitbucket.org/[/url] for our git repositories, it works great. (Allthough cloning large repos can be a bit slow and its only free for up to 5 users)
[/quote]
I was going to ask if it was private but it seems it already is. :o That's awesome and it's free which makes it easy. :P It's only going to be 3 people so I don't think I'd new a pro version anyway. That's awesome thanks for the link!
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I can personally give recommendations for both bitbucket and assembla (who are a site affiliate here, it seems). Used both, had no issues, enjoyed the communication tools for working with up to 5 other people on projects (to include my CS capstone course project).
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[quote name='BCullis' timestamp='1341947368' post='4957734']
I can personally give recommendations for both bitbucket and assembla (who are a site affiliate here, it seems). Used both, had no issues, enjoyed the communication tools for working with up to 5 other people on projects (to include my CS capstone course project).
[/quote]
I wish i knew about both of those when i had my capstone :P Would have made it much easier. We didn't use anything, not even dropbox. Wasn't very well planned sadly.
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You can just download git or svn and use the command-line. Some other third-party software enable most of these commands as GUI buttons integrated within the explorer(RabbitCVS/Tortoise etc).

Personally I like using the command-line because it pulls you out of being dependent on the OS. We have installed both of them on our server for private use because we didn't want our code uploaded on an external server. Edited by DZee
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[quote name='DZee' timestamp='1341961969' post='4957824']
You can just download github or svn and use the command-line. Some other third-party software enable most of these commands as GUI buttons integrated within the explorer(RabbitCVS/Tortoise etc).

Personally I like using the command-line because it pulls you out of being dependent on the OS. We have installed both of them on our server for private use because we didn't want our code uploaded on an external server.
[/quote]

Really, that sounds much better than the GUI at this point lmao. I feel like that's probably better just incase I even end up moving platforms. :P

[quote name='Awekingster' timestamp='1341967101' post='4957843']
You know that Getting VS 2011 and Vs 2012 is easy not hard to get it
[/quote]

I'm not sure where you going with that statement, care to explain? Because I don't plan on obtaining it illegally.
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I recommend git if you have the choice. Here's a resource that can get your started on using it with commands. It might feel slow when you begin, but eventually it becomes second nature.

[url="http://cworth.org/hgbook-git/tour/"]http://cworth.org/hgbook-git/tour/[/url]

Here is the official website just in case.

[url="http://git-scm.com/"]http://git-scm.com/[/url] Edited by DZee
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[quote name='DZee' timestamp='1342140573' post='4958608']
I recommend git if you have the choice. Here's a resource that can get your started on using it with commands. It might feel slow when you begin, but eventually it becomes second nature.

[url="http://cworth.org/hgbook-git/tour/"]http://cworth.org/hgbook-git/tour/[/url]

Here is the official website just in case.

[url="http://git-scm.com/"]http://git-scm.com/[/url]
[/quote]

Thanks! I actually got started a bit tonight! Doesn't seem that hard to get into. :D Thanks
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Ok just to throw another one in there [url="http://www.perforce.com/"]Perforce[/url] isn't awe full either and comes with a VS plugin and an IDE, but is sadly a paid for solution but one that is used in a lot of places in the industry.

I found setting up the initial repositories and server far easier than doing the same for a SVN, but that might also just be because I work daily with perforce and not any of the others.

A proper standalone IDE for SVN is rapidsvn btw and it is decent to work with. Edited by NightCreature83
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[quote name='Inuyashakagome16' timestamp='1341970099' post='4957849']
Awekingster, on 10 July 2012 - 07:38 PM, said:
You know that Getting VS 2011 and Vs 2012 is easy not hard to get it

I'm not sure where you going with that statement, care to explain? Because I don't plan on obtaining it illegally.
[/quote]

I am not sure what he was refering to but there are several ways for people to get legitimate copies of all Microsoft's software for free if you know where to look. We have been a member of their [Microsoft] programs for some time and have all the updated versions of everything we use and some not commercially released software. It is all free to startup companies set up by Microsoft to help get you up and running. There are also other services they offer to program members for free as well.

edited to add spaces on run together words. Edited by Liquid Shock Games
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