Jump to content
  • Advertisement
Sign in to follow this  
devv

Did you succeed in building a game from a Game Engine?

This topic is 2341 days old which is more than the 365 day threshold we allow for new replies. Please post a new topic.

If you intended to correct an error in the post then please contact us.

Recommended Posts

Hi all,

I'm an experienced programmer, but not specifically in game dev. I've got some friends (all dev geeks!) who would like to join me to create a casual game in a virtual world.
To know what we sign for (!), we want to know what is your experience of schedule/size of the team, as a function of the game, using an engine like Unity.

Could you answer with your experience:
- engine used
- game (if you can provide a link to see how more complex it is compared to what we want to do)
- the time it took to get a beta version
- size of the team?

Thanks !!!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Advertisement
For our school project we had to make a game in "14 days" (this is in quotes because we also spent time outside project days on it. All in all probably 20 days).

For this we used Ogre3D, this is not actually a game engine, so things like physics (Nvidia PhysX) and audio (FMOD) and such were all implemented by ourself. Our team consisted of 4 programmers (including myself as a tech lead), 1 designer, 1 project team lead and something along 10 artists or so whose tasks ranged from audio to modeling, to texturing and whatnot.

Here's the full playthrough by one of the programmers (who know where to go mostly). Hope it helps!

[media]
[/media]

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

- engine used

Own engine.


- game (if you can provide a link to see how more complex it is compared to what we want to do)

[media]
[/media]


- the time it took to get a beta version

Not in beta yet, but almost alpha. Engine+Game took more than 12 years sofar smile.png


- size of the team?

~1 (+part sparetime artist for the last years)

Concluse: hmmm... use some existing engine if you want to make faster progress biggrin.png Edited by Ashaman73

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Looks like 12 years is a bit too much for us, but hopefully we don't want to develop our own engine!!!! ;-)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

For our school project we had to make a game in "14 days" (this is in quotes because we also spent time outside project days on it. All in all probably 20 days).



Very impressive!!! Great work!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I think it all boils down to efficient division of labour. I think I'd go a lot faster if I could develop with others who'd be my exact complement. As soon as there is competence overlap then there are going to be ego problems such as will we use my solution or yours or if my solution is always discarded because it's inferior I'd feel I'm no longer part of the team etc. However if I'm fully specialised in , say, rendering and you in game logic or physics then there's full conplementarity and no stepping on each others feet. And we could fully concentrate on a topic rather than be scared that we still have so much to sift through. So how I see it gamemaking is mostly a people management problem.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

As soon as there is competence overlap then there are going to be ego problems such as will we use my solution or yours or if my solution is always discarded because it's inferior I'd feel I'm no longer part of the team etc

This is one of the reasons good dev studios have lengthy, selective hiring processes and are always looking for good people: there are swarms of technically competent people out there, but only a small fraction of them can work well with others. I'm sure you're speaking hypothetically, but if your idea gets discarded, that doesn't mean you don't have something to do anyway (just a different implementation) and if you start to get defensive over sections of code...yea, not so good.
In all honesty, this situation isn't going to happen that often. You either have a tech/design lead, who makes most of the calls on design, or you're given your own black-box and i/o contract ("your module needs to accept a .jpg and spit out a heightmap with decent efficiency, internal implementation is up to you"), or it's a small team and there's enough work to go around already that people are just handed certain sections of the design and told to work with eachother on an agreed-upon interface between components. In any case, if the team communicates and agrees on why something is accepted vs thrown out, the "wounded ego" problem shouldn't occur because everyone got to voice their reasoning. You'd be surprised how far simply letting people explain their idea will go in getting them to buy in to the best solution. (This comes up in several Agile processes, too).

Edit: additionally, I'd much rather have competency overlap: if only one person knows how to do X, then only one implementation of X will ever be attempted. If 3 people know how to do X, you (hopefully) discover the best of three possible ways to do X, kind of a genetic algorithm that spits out the best code for your game. Edited by BCullis

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Any other experience in developing a game?

I believe that a pure mathematician and/or physicist would be a nice asset in a small indie team.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Sign in to follow this  

  • Advertisement
×

Important Information

By using GameDev.net, you agree to our community Guidelines, Terms of Use, and Privacy Policy.

GameDev.net is your game development community. Create an account for your GameDev Portfolio and participate in the largest developer community in the games industry.

Sign me up!