• Announcements

    • khawk

      Download the Game Design and Indie Game Marketing Freebook   07/19/17

      GameDev.net and CRC Press have teamed up to bring a free ebook of content curated from top titles published by CRC Press. The freebook, Practices of Game Design & Indie Game Marketing, includes chapters from The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, and An Architectural Approach to Level Design. The GameDev.net FreeBook is relevant to game designers, developers, and those interested in learning more about the challenges in game development. We know game development can be a tough discipline and business, so we picked several chapters from CRC Press titles that we thought would be of interest to you, the GameDev.net audience, in your journey to design, develop, and market your next game. The free ebook is available through CRC Press by clicking here. The Curated Books The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, Second Edition, by Jesse Schell Presents 100+ sets of questions, or different lenses, for viewing a game’s design, encompassing diverse fields such as psychology, architecture, music, film, software engineering, theme park design, mathematics, anthropology, and more. Written by one of the world's top game designers, this book describes the deepest and most fundamental principles of game design, demonstrating how tactics used in board, card, and athletic games also work in video games. It provides practical instruction on creating world-class games that will be played again and again. View it here. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, by Joel Dreskin Marketing is an essential but too frequently overlooked or minimized component of the release plan for indie games. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing provides you with the tools needed to build visibility and sell your indie games. With special focus on those developers with small budgets and limited staff and resources, this book is packed with tangible recommendations and techniques that you can put to use immediately. As a seasoned professional of the indie game arena, author Joel Dreskin gives you insight into practical, real-world experiences of marketing numerous successful games and also provides stories of the failures. View it here. An Architectural Approach to Level Design This is one of the first books to integrate architectural and spatial design theory with the field of level design. The book presents architectural techniques and theories for level designers to use in their own work. It connects architecture and level design in different ways that address the practical elements of how designers construct space and the experiential elements of how and why humans interact with this space. Throughout the text, readers learn skills for spatial layout, evoking emotion through gamespaces, and creating better levels through architectural theory. View it here. Learn more and download the ebook by clicking here. Did you know? GameDev.net and CRC Press also recently teamed up to bring GDNet+ Members up to a 20% discount on all CRC Press books. Learn more about this and other benefits here.
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0
3DModelerMan

CouchDB for player accounts

5 posts in this topic

Hi, I'm working on an app that I need to write player account support for. I've created "profiles" and "high-scores" databases on Cloudant and I'm planning to use the HTTP API to work with the database from my code. I've generated an API key for the database with the permissions I'll need the program to have. I'm going to create a document for each user profile. How should I handle users? If I just had a username and password field stored in the database then it wouldn't be secure since the password would be sent along with the HTTP request. Is there a way to run code on the server? Like a script that will only return the profile's data if the password sent to it matches the user's password? Obviously I would use HTTPs instead of HTTP when sending the data.

EDIT
I found out I can create accounts through the HTTP API should I have the "everyone else" permissions set to allow read and write so that I just use the HTTP API to log the user in and start accessing files? Or are users of the database meant to be something else? If I understand correctly accounts can only be created by admins, so then I would use the API key that I generated to create accounts and upload high scores. Edited by 3DModelerMan
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
You want to hash the salted user password, so when the user sebds his pass, you salt and hash it, and compare against the one in the database. This way you dont store the actual password so hacking your database isnt going to reveal everyones pass to the hacker.

Maybe even do the same on the username so the haxors cant figure out which hashed pass belongs to which user.
1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
So do I do that on the C++ side and then send the hashed username and password? How do I unhash it on the server?
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
[quote name='3DModelerMan' timestamp='1342367843' post='4959289']
So do I do that on the C++ side and then send the hashed username and password? How do I unhash it on the server?
[/quote]
Yes and you don't. You store and compare hashes.
1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
When it comes to user/password storage:
Actually, you typically do NOT send the hashed password from the client -- that just turns the hash into the "new" clear-text password.
You send the password from the client, and hash it on the server, and compare to the hash in the database.
You typically want to use a salt that comes from some hard-to-discover source, to protect against rainbow table attacks.
You typically also want to use a purposefully slow hash function, like bcrypt, to protect against brute force attacks.

However, it sounds like you're using a particular API from a particular service provider. You should do whatever makes sense within that context.
It's likely that their "users" already do the password storage and authentication.
Typically, the server process itself will use a "low level identity" for connecting to the database, and your users will be "high level identities" within your application. No matter which "high-level identity" talks to the server, the server itself runs with a particular identity, and that's what's used to talk to the database.
Depending on what your particular service provider and API implements, they may also implement "high-level identity" support for ACLs and read/write permissions. The right decision for data structure and security comes from your understanding the use case, the threat model, and the available tools. There is no one "true" answer.
That being said: If I, as a user, can connect and say "here's a new highscore table file" then you should be prepared for users uploading... "creatively enhanced" files.
2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Thanks for the advice. I found an entire book online about CouchDB, so I think I'll read through that to figure out how to pull of your suggestions.
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0