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Gatsby12

New Game Ideas Feedback Appreciated

6 posts in this topic

[font="monospace"][font=lucida sans unicode,lucida grande,sans-serif]I am new too programming in Java and find it interesting. I want to start a game and need ideas/help. Please post feedback, it would be very helpful. The direction I am choosing is a multiplayer/resource game but I need an original idea.[/font][/font]
[font="monospace"][font=lucida sans unicode,lucida grande,sans-serif]Thanks.[/font][/font]
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[quote name='Gatsby12' timestamp='1342504293' post='4959885']
I am new too programming in Java
[/quote]

I am going to repeat something that has probably been said many many times and probably you have also been told previously.

Start small.

I am not sure if you have programming experience in other languages, but even if you do. By starting at the beginning and working through the syntactic changes this will provide you with a very good base to develop into more complex games. I am not saying you can't start on a complex game...just that it means you are dealing with an additional workload of all the associated mechanics of game design being placed on top of your learning curve in Java. Why make work harder for yourself? By starting small you should be able to move onto much larger things very rapidly with the essential building blocks having been learnt.

There should be a lot of websites out there that have code samples as well coded games that you can utilise in your learning. I wish you the best of luck and welcome to Gamedev. [img]http://public.gamedev.net//public/style_emoticons/default/smile.png[/img]


Edit:

[quote name='Gatsby12' timestamp='1342504293' post='4959885']
The direction I am choosing is a multiplayer/resource game but I need an original idea.
[/quote]

You and the other players in the game are different types of Jellies. Your resources to collect are water, jelly crystals and lifesparks. Jelly crystal come in different colours. With the right colour jelly crystal you can make mobile jelly resource collectors and different types of warrior jellies. Different combinations of the resources allows you to create changes in your own jelly self thus being able to create new type of jellies. Ingestion (a form of research) of different components enables you to learn new jelly types to create. The goal -- to consume the other players before they consume you. Edited by Stormynature
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I have good experience in C++ and in HTML. I have many friend that know Java ok. I can learn along the way and found that best way for me.
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As Stormynature stated start with something like pong or even chess if you know the basic.
BUT when doing that and here is where the issue start when reading most of the tutorials:

Don't write a bunch of code in just one big class. Make use of entities, actor pattern, ... (interfaces and abstract classes).

If you get the hang of it, try creating a basic poker game with AI, so you get the hang of how comparables work, equals, AI, ...
And don't forget on how to pause, safe your money in a file, ...
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It would be nice if anyone could come and help with the development of a game/games. They would get a part in the company if a game is successful. Thats thinking big but I think the company could start with simple games.
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[quote name='Gatsby12' timestamp='1342511105' post='4959913']
It would be nice if anyone could come and help with the development of a game/games. They would get a part in the company if a game is successful.
[/quote]

Try to avoid saying things like this ...as all you will get is a moderator closing your thread on the basis that if you want people to join up with you then it should be done through the "Help Wanted" forums. Keep with the topic of your original post. If you are looking for team ups...by all means post a thread in Help Wanted. Edited by Stormynature
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[quote name='goowik' timestamp='1342510539' post='4959909']
As Stormynature stated start with something like pong or even chess if you know the basic..
[/quote]

I think it would be much more motivating to start with projects you're interested in, rather than "standard" games like tic tac toe, chess, pong etc.

Or shop around and see what kind of indy/hobby games have been made in your preferred language, that you would enjoy making/playing. Try to reduce the game to the most basic state. Then, isolate the features that make up this basic game and try to produce tech demos for them. If you are able to do a demo for all of the features, you can then try to blend them together to reproduce the basic game.

By the end of this exercise, you would have made a basic version of the game you enjoy or want to make, and be equipped with the knowledge to add features or enhance it into your own unique game. Probably a more motivating endpoint than just making chess or pong. [img]http://public.gamedev.net//public/style_emoticons/default/biggrin.png[/img] Edited by Legendre
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