• Announcements

    • khawk

      Download the Game Design and Indie Game Marketing Freebook   07/19/17

      GameDev.net and CRC Press have teamed up to bring a free ebook of content curated from top titles published by CRC Press. The freebook, Practices of Game Design & Indie Game Marketing, includes chapters from The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, and An Architectural Approach to Level Design. The GameDev.net FreeBook is relevant to game designers, developers, and those interested in learning more about the challenges in game development. We know game development can be a tough discipline and business, so we picked several chapters from CRC Press titles that we thought would be of interest to you, the GameDev.net audience, in your journey to design, develop, and market your next game. The free ebook is available through CRC Press by clicking here. The Curated Books The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, Second Edition, by Jesse Schell Presents 100+ sets of questions, or different lenses, for viewing a game’s design, encompassing diverse fields such as psychology, architecture, music, film, software engineering, theme park design, mathematics, anthropology, and more. Written by one of the world's top game designers, this book describes the deepest and most fundamental principles of game design, demonstrating how tactics used in board, card, and athletic games also work in video games. It provides practical instruction on creating world-class games that will be played again and again. View it here. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, by Joel Dreskin Marketing is an essential but too frequently overlooked or minimized component of the release plan for indie games. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing provides you with the tools needed to build visibility and sell your indie games. With special focus on those developers with small budgets and limited staff and resources, this book is packed with tangible recommendations and techniques that you can put to use immediately. As a seasoned professional of the indie game arena, author Joel Dreskin gives you insight into practical, real-world experiences of marketing numerous successful games and also provides stories of the failures. View it here. An Architectural Approach to Level Design This is one of the first books to integrate architectural and spatial design theory with the field of level design. The book presents architectural techniques and theories for level designers to use in their own work. It connects architecture and level design in different ways that address the practical elements of how designers construct space and the experiential elements of how and why humans interact with this space. Throughout the text, readers learn skills for spatial layout, evoking emotion through gamespaces, and creating better levels through architectural theory. View it here. Learn more and download the ebook by clicking here. Did you know? GameDev.net and CRC Press also recently teamed up to bring GDNet+ Members up to a 20% discount on all CRC Press books. Learn more about this and other benefits here.
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0
CptMinecraft

Where do I start learning c++

13 posts in this topic

Hello I'm Cpt and I making a 2d 8 bit sandbox RPG game like Terraria. But the problem is I don't know where to learn c++ and what program to use for Mac to use to make the game. If you want any info I am running a MacBook and I have experience with photoshop and I would like to know if a can get a PDF of how to make a game using c++. And last if I make a game on Mac would it work on Windows when finished

See ya

-CaptainMinecraft

Oh and if you want info on the world of the game is going to be randomly generated with my custom terrain and you can break and place blocks
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
A resource I can not stress enough is

'Professional C++' (2nd Edition), by Marc Gregoire, Nicholas A. Solter and Scott J. Kleper, it will bring you up to speed with well... alot of stuff. And most important of all - It teaches you HOW to program! It reaches on alot of topics, and its easy to approach. And if you download the source code that goes with it (and make sure you really go through it while reading), you'll pick it up in no time.

And you'll need to experiment alot to... it takes alot of time. I'm making the same journey myself
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I mainly use cplusplus.com as a reference site. Personally, I would buy a book and study C++ from it. There are quite a few articles on the internets about how to get a rendering system going, and you can experiment with game logic yourself.
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
In the tutorial on cplusplus.com they have the blue and light grey sIDE on the program what program on Mac do you use to code?
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
[quote name='Dwarf King' timestamp='1342653133' post='4960703']
Seek no more: [url="http://www.cplusplus.com/"]http://www.cplusplus.com/[/url] [img]http://public.gamedev.net//public/style_emoticons/default/biggrin.png[/img] That link will teach you C++, but not how to make games(that will come later on). For making games you should head to the resources - books.

Here you go a link we go: [url="http://www.gamedev.net/page/books/index.html/_/technical/game-programming-9/beginning-c-through-game-programming-r1427"]http://www.gamedev.net/page/books/index.html/_/technical/game-programming-9/beginning-c-through-game-programming-r1427[/url]
[/quote]
In the tutorial on cplusplus.com they have the blue and light grey sIDE on the program what program on Mac do you use to code?
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Don't bother with an IDE for starters. Just use your favorite text editor and compile with a terminal. It will teach you some fundamental things about compilers and if you ever switch platform you will always have a fallback in case you have no IDE since most compiler options share a similar interface.

Otherwise there's QtCreator, Eclipse, Code::Blocks, search stackoverflow for that one.

As for learning I recommend C++ Primer 6th edition. It has questions and exercises at the end of each chapter. It also covers C++x0 features.
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
[quote name='dimitri.adamou' timestamp='1342664511' post='4960774']
Or opt for Eclipse, it works in Mac

http://www.eclipse.org/downloads/
[/quote]

Good God no!

Recommending Eclipse as a c++ IDE is like recommending dynamite as a laxative. Yes, it might get the job done, but it will kill you in the process.

If Mac is the requirement, check out either XCode, Code Blocks or Qt Creator. If you must use a poorly configured Java IDE with C++ support bolted on, use Netbeans.
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I've really enjoyed bucky's tutorials on youtube (his youtube name is thenewboston): http://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLAE85DE8440AA6B83&feature=plcp
I use code::blocks.
I'm on tutorial 21 of c++, and I've gone through 40 of his java tutorials. It really helps being able to watch the tutorial, and he explains it very clearly for beginners. I'm taking c++ next semester and trying to get a head start on the class over the summer.
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
If i had to make a suggestion start with this for the 2d game aspect:
[url="http://www.kathekonta.com/rlguide/index.html"]http://www.kathekont...uide/index.html[/url] (note: This tutorial set was written for win32 but it DOES work in Linux, not Mac though[img]http://public.gamedev.net//public/style_emoticons/default/sad.png[/img])
Its an absolutely amazing in depth guide on how to build a 2d (overhead) game engine ONLY using c++ console. No need to worry about graphics yet, get the basics first.
A good C++ resource I would suggest is C++ Primer Plus by Stephen Prata its an amazing book for learning c++ with little programming knowledge.

Edit: Oh and I completely agree with DZee just write the source files in something like Notepad++ (google it) and then just compile using your terminal(or console i dont use mac) There is nothing more useful than seeing the raw compiler data when you have some kind of compile error. Edited by Attemptedhippo
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I agree that cplusplus.com helped me alot. What may help you alot too is look at the site's examples and try to translate it into english inside your mind. I think this what helped me alot. I havent touched C since I was a kid. Just now, I'm relearning everything. You'll get it, just hang in there! It's just less complicated when one understands easily. Hell, riding a bike was rough, a couple of tries it's more easier riding a bike. Just had to through a analogy.
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0